Hong Niao, No. 34

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REDBIRD will live forever -HONG NIAO is to 6e preserved jor posterity! · Jl'K.'U SI' s Library has esta6fished an ~rchives and Specia[ Coffections . section to preserve documents, pu6fications and news[etters of the 'Universi_ty' s history. They . were cfever enough to perceive that our news[etter is of historica[ vafue and ask__ed us to provide copies of aa issues, past and future. We'{[ 6e cata[ogued .under 'University 'vVomen's Group. Just think__ - 100 years from now, peopfe wiff stiff 6e enjoying HONG NIAO!

J\J..ow I must jly ...

'Editor

I'm going

_

to

be

immortal!

A Newsletter for

Senior Staff

and

their families of

.

.

The Hong Kong University of

Science

&

Technology

CAMPUS

CHRONICLES

By

Public Demand

-Another Garage Sale!

Following· the success of the Garage Sale last month, it has been decided to hold anoth~r on Saturday 14 December, 10.00 a.m. · - 2.00 p.m. in LG2 Car Park (under cover - just past Park'n Shop, going down the hill towards

. Towers 1 & 2). ·

Adults and children are invited to join in

the fun - bringing along sale items; coming to buy; or even just to browse. Tables and chairs will be provided and will be available from 9.00 a.m. for you to set up shop. It is recommended that you book a table in advance.

If you have items too large to take to the sale, notice boards will be available to display "Wanted To Sell" and· "Wanted To Buy". There will also be an area available where items can be given away free. For further information contact: Judith Tang 'B' (2358) 8169 or Jean Hudson 'B' (2358) 8295 or Email G UJEAN ~~-~~~

1r,,,i

~~~~

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Chinese

A

ntique

Buyi

n

g Excursio

n

Karin Weber is offering lovers of Chinese antiques the opportunity to buy genuine antique furniture and accessories at wholesale prices from the Old Temple warehouse in Zhaoqing.

·You will be able to view all items in their original condition and may then decide to have your purchases cleaned up or restored to your own personal taste. Delivery can be arranged.

So if you and your friends would like to join this excursion (staying in a 4-Star hotel), contact:

~

Karin Weber ·. Karin Weber Co. Ltd., Room B, 15/F Yan's Tower, 25027 Wong Chuk Hang Rd.,

Aberdeen, Hong Kong. Ph: 2544.5004 Fax: 2545.2348

Planning Your

Ch

r

istmas Calendar?

Yes? If so, you may like to make a note on your calendar for the evening of Friday, December 13 -- Christmas caroling on Campus.

Watch this space for further details.

Did

·

you know

that there we

r

e

actually FOUR

wise inen?

Yes ... on the way

to Bethlehem one

of them said he

.

knew a

short cut!

Judith Tang

C

h

ri

s

tmas Fa

i

r

A Christmas Fair will be held in our Academic Concourse on Friday, November 29 from 11 a.m. -6 p.m.

Judith Tang

IL I

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llrii' IHI

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Ot

· REDBIRD: I have a question about orgamzmg another play area for Towers V, VI and VII .. The current play area is nice for older children, but not very safe for children under, say, 5. It has a platform at least 6 foot high that is open on one side. A child of 2, 3 or 4 loves to climb but can't be trusted to stay away from the open side of the platform, and clearly a fall from so high up could cause a lot of damage.

There's space for an additional small play area if EMO closed off just two parking spaces -- the two closest to the Tower V entrance. These spaces are very long but can only hold two, rather than four cars, because there's a sidewalk in front. Thus, a second car would block in the first one.

The sides are closed off and the' sidewalk is in front, so it wo.uld only be necessary to put up a low wall (say, 5 foot high) in back to stop some of the exhaust fumes and to keep children from wandering out in front of cars.

With the opening at the top in back and with the front open, the area should still be well ventilated.

The cost wouldn't be very great just the wall, and installing the play equipment and again only two parking spaces would be lost. The area would be at least partly sheltered

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from the rain unlike the only current play area and strollers (pushchairs) could be taken there, whereas the only current play area is down a long flight of steps. Most important, the many small children in these three buildings woul4 finally have a safe place to climb and play.

Currently, many of us climb up the hill to Tower III, where there is appropriate climbing equipment for small.

children,· but it's a long, hard (and sometimes wet) climb. ·

I hope EMO will consider the needs· of the many families with · small children in these three buildings.

A Stroller Pusher

Kids have it

easy these

days. :\iVhen

we were their

age, we had to

walk

miles

back

and forth to the

TV

set because

there were no

remote channel

changers!

Mike Hudson, Director of

EMO replies:

We have recently contacted companies who specialise in playground equipment and safety surfacing. · They will each develop schemes and we will . tender the job. We also want to make some improvements to ensure safe traffic circulation around Towers V, VI, and VII and are examining the two projects together. Procurement times for play equipment can be quite long, so I hope you can be patient.

As for pushing strollers up the hill, I really haven't got much to say - just one of the delights of having children, I suppose. My mind did run riot for a while with thoughts of launching · the kids off the roof on some sort of boatswain's chair to a platform halfway .up the. hill, but I decided not to . put in an application for funding!

During the development of the project we looked at the possibility of a hillside trail up the slope, at the back of the blocks, but it was over HK$1,000,000 to build. It wouldn't have helped stroller pushers, however, as the steepness of the slope meant that there would have had to be a lot of steps.

I I I I T I I I I I

IUIITCII

JJ1lth

Ji/m ~

.

J.{artfia 'Dali{en is liaving a weff-earned rest tliis mimtli, so we've invited J-f'KJlST s favourite 11

6irdd1

to contribute to tliis montli' s 'Jl[ature

W

atcli. 'Eel

1111

ZlliZllli

IIIEIIIJIIS

Ii

iovani Ribandeneira, of the Quicha people, lives on the banks of the Rio N apo in the Amazonas of Ecuador. He guides . at nearby Sacha Lodge. On an

afternoon in August, we are on a board walk in the rainforest as the light begins to fade. Giavani carries a powerful Sony, but does

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not wear a wristwatch. He con-sults mine anxiously, intimating (he has little English) that he wants to be somewhere particular as darkness falls.

All day this man has popped tapes into his machine, and has pulled ("6ircfspeaf:.:.' for "We were ex_treme(y successfa{ in attrading ... ''

'E..cl) antbirds, antshrikes, man-ikins, and foliage-gleaners to bin-filling (a great view through 6inocufars

-'Ecf.) distances. So I follow with anticipation as he strides off. We come to some pantanal (swamp),

and Giovani slackens his place ..

He listens, and grunts with satis-faction. I detect no special call in the cacophony. Giovani rumm-ages in his tapes, pulls one out, and soon the call of the Zigzag

Heron. pours from the Sony. I can

hear them now: they seem quite

far away. It is getting

uncomfort-ably dark. Giovani switches off the tape and steps off the

board-walk. He then rearranges the

vegetation stamping reeds and bush aside, creating a narrow path for about lOm to a small clearing. Now he seizes a palm frond and bends it at right angles, laying it across his little path and totally obscuring the vista he has made.

Presumably there is some sense to .

this.

Giovani is back on the boardwalk, and the Sony pumps

out sound once more. As it is dusk, the calls of the forest are dying away, but I hear crashing in the foliage at perhaps 50m.

Giavani retreats and plays the call again, softly this time. The

crashing comes closer but I can see nothing. It is full dark. We have had an excellent day, and I give what I hope is a resigned or contented shrug, and intimate

that we should push off home. Giavani shakes his head. Puts the tape away. Ten fingers are raised. I think that is ten minutes. With a low-power torch, Giavani

occupies himself tidying his backpack. I stand in the dark.

I once had a

low-power

torch, but it

never worked

very weII.

How come?

It

was

solar

-

powered!

· After, indeed, about ten minutes,

Giavani listens. There is not a·

.sound. He is pleased, rises, and motions for me to follow. I am to be very quiet. Slowly, slowly, we step off the board walk and advance along the little path

Giavani made. But only for Sm or

so. I am

to

stop. Squat down, Giavani's hand indicates. He does likewise. Checks to see I am

settled, chooses his low-power torch, and. switches it on.

I understand now. Giovani knew the Zigzag Herons were in this general area. When they hear a supposed intruder they will come to dispute territory, but will not emerge ORto a boardwalk. Fainter calls show the rival. is retreating, so they have won. But look at the time! All this excite-ment consumed the last hour of daylight, and it will be dark in 3 minutes. A roost is now an imperative, and a horizontal

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palm frond is sturdy and avail-able.

There is a pair. One (male?) slightly larger than the other. Delicate plumage waviness visible in intimate detail. The eyes appear open and blue, gleaming. gently in the low torchlight. Stiff bodies, with uptilted pale bills, as they roost. Enticed· by Giavani to the roost he made for them, and placed on the frond by the tape at the exact moment when the last light

drained from the sky. We have a .

pair of Zigzag Herons at 2m,

asleep in their Amazonas home.

JJ

Belgian, Leon de Lunden, killed 21 pigeons to . win the Olympic Pigeon Shooting gold medal in

1900 - fortunately it was the

.only time the euent was held!

Oh give me

The luck to

Catch a fish

,v

ould you like to hear

one of my poerris, too?

Yes please,

M

r

. Chien!

So big that

Even I

-\iVhen talking

Of it afterwards

May have no

Need to lie!

SUIILLIIU•s

I I E S T

®:th

S

,UJflP.fom

Wei

My

Peach

Garden

''J

.

. ourney to the Peach

Garden"

_J.,~

,..r -:~ _..)..

11l..

1t.~,;J,

JG

was written by Tao Chien

f!;J

51f"

(372 -427 AD). This famous

article was selected for my junior

high school's Chinese Language

course. It touched me in my early

days --the image of the article is

still vivid in my mind. It especially

inspired ME when I realised the

living environment at HKUST's

campus was similar to the picture

presented in the Peach Garden.

The story for the Peach Garden is as follows:

Whilst exploring, a fisherman lost his way and found himself in a Peach

Forest. Beautiful fiowers dropped from the trees, a vast land of green, green grass

and no weeds on the ground. Out of

curiosity, the fisherman searched further. Through a narrow clearing he could see a shadow of light which revealed a mountain. The fisherman skipped from the boat and walked into another world.

Walking squeezingly for several steps, he finally reached flat land with grand houses, good farm land, ponds, bamboo trees, mulberry. trees, etc. The road connection was good, and he could hear chickens cackling and dogs barking. Men and women, dressed differently from what he knew, appeared to work happily in

· the farm lands. When they saw the

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the villagers asked the fisherman about himself and invited him home for a meal. The remaining villagers, upon hearing of all of this, rushed over to chat with the

fisherman. · · ·

According to the villagers, their ancestors had sheltered in this wonderful land in a time of trouble, and had never left it. Therefore, they were segregated from the outside world. The villagers asked the ' fisherman about the date and dynasty --they did not know there had been a Han dynasty nor a Wei or Jin dynasty. Upon

hearing this, they all sighed. Many

villagers continued to invite the fisherman to their houses for meals and wine. A few days later, the fisherman left. Before leaving, the villagers reminded the fisherman that what had occurred inside the village should not be mentioned to outsiders.

The fisherman found his boat, retraced his route and returned home. He then reported to the county officer what had happened to him. The officer was so impressed, he issued orders for others to return with the fisherman to the Peach Garden. But, somehow, they could not find it. Another nobleman, M/1 Uu, heard of this and tried to find it, but also failed. Ever since then, no-one has been able to find it."

The similarity between the picture of the Peach Garden and the HKUST environment is rein-forced by the following personal encounters at the Ngau Chi Wan

f

~~

f

tJ

J

wet market

--a ne--arby street m--arket:

-• Mr. Yen, a fruit seller, chats with me about HKUST life and teaches me how to select good fruit. I have learned a lot from him.

A vegetarian shop lady who, despite having two sons, 27 and 23, does not show her age and offers good prices and a wide variety of vegetarian foods with cheap prices.

• A vegetable seller, upon seeing me, always as.ks about my children.

• A barber with efficient and· excellent skills and cheap rates (haircut - $50, haircut and wash

- $66) told me that one's hair condition reflects one's health and temper. This barber's knowledge of politics (in China), · personal lives and local information is so fascinating to me.

At the Hau-Tek-Gai-Shi,

41t1~1

which is

air-conditioned during summer time, · you can get food at comparable prices with the Ngau-Ch i-Wan 'h'.et market. Sellers at both markets are equally accessible, especially if you do business with them for a while.

Within HKUST, distilled water is delivered to the front door. ·

· Also, a truck food seller is stat

-ioned here on weekdays. Our campus exercise facilities are also very convenient. Best of all, the unbeatable "no-enemy-sea-view"

~~f

·

makes

many of my visitors say this campus is like a six star hotel. Living in. such a relaxing environment, people may live longer. I feel luckier than the storyteller, Mr. Tao Chien -- he lost his Peach Garden (a Platonic world for him, maybe?) while I hav~ not.

_-'l

You know,

children

don't

hate

vegetables ...

they just hate

to

eat

them!

(7)

·

Wi

s

h

D

'

d

S

a

id

%at

-8roucho

iMrtrx ...

fr-OM the MOMeNt I picked up your book up uNtil I laid it d owN, I

was coNvulsed with

laughter-s OMeday I iNteNd r-eadiNg it!

I've just

r

ead yo

ur

·

new book.

Who w

r

o

t

e

i

t

fo

r

you?

Who

r

ead

it to you?

F

ROM

OUR

FOREIG.

N

,

C

ORRE

S

POND

E

NT

JJJ.tth

R

u&tJ,

7

Dao

Out

of

Africa

I

went to Sun City, South Africa in April 1996 with my hus-band, George, who had to attend a scientific conference. It was about a two hour drive from Johannesburg airport.

· Sun City was an area of bloc!( settlement during apart

-heid years. Later, an American entrepreneur built a resort town in the style of

a

legendary ancient palace with its imagin

-ary splendor. It has modern amenities rivaling .the most luxurious resorts of the world. The palace is surrounded by fountains, waterfalls, pools, golf courses, tennis courts, botanical gardens, game reserves, and even a human-made sea

-shore with artificial waves. Simulated earthquakes in the palace grounds are activated every hour with lights and

sound.

There are several hotels of varying price ranges serving different functions -- amusement centers, conference facilities, performance theaters, etc. All are connected by shuttle buses. A major attraction in all these hotels is the casinos -

-. gambling is prohibited in other_ white-ruled areas. We stayed 1n ·

a lower priced hotel because the shuttle buses gave us

access to other places in the complex, including the palace, which itself is a high priced · ·hotel.

The conference organized several tours -- a gold mining town; a diamond center {no free samples}; a cheetah farm, and a nearby game reserve. The game reserve banquet was a conference event we all joined, while other tours were arranged individually, with extra costs. We travelled in tall safari jeeps, ending up in an open air banquet with entertainment provided by the natives.

Another expedition was a three-day bus tour of Kruger National

Park.

A full bus load of Americans and Europeans

(8)

went on this tour. It took two solid days of driving to get to

the park, although· we did

spend a little time at a few

scenic and historical points of

interest along the way.

Our tour guide was very

enthusiastic and

knowledgeable about animals and plant life, as well as the

history of the country. We drove

on top quality highways

--mostly through open spaces

' with occasio'nal forests of pine and eucalyptus. The tall

eucal-yptus trees were originally

imported from Australia. We

passed a few sunflower farms

--whole fields of bright yellow

flowers were in bloom. The

drive through Blyde River Canyon was spectacular. The highway is on a high plateau

that offers a panoramic view.

South Africa is a beautiful·

country with incredibly blue

skies which we were not

accust-omed to seeing after having lived in polluted countries for so

long. It is also a very rich country with gold mines, diamond mines and other mineral mines. Miles and miles of potential farmland should produce ample food for a population of about 25 million.

When we arrived at

Kruger National Park, we had to

spend almost another day on

the road because the Park is

350 kilometers lo11g. The

Europ-eans started to complain ·

about the long bus ride

because they were not used to

such long distances. Because

of trees and bushes, it was

difficult to see large groups of

animals. Of the park's "Big Five·

-- lions, elephants, buffaloes,

rhinos and leopards -- we did

not see leopards. We saw only

a hump or two of rhinos in the rivers, at great distances.

Here I must stop to

men-tion that a high powered pair of

binoculars is a must for such a .

trip. (Yes, you tteeci tfiem far 6itt-fiffitt9

ciistances -U.) We saw lots of

impalas, zebras, elephants and once, a turtle on the highway by the bus. ~('/ \J ft/

We will

1

shortly

.

be passing

the

largest

pub in

South

Africa

About fifteen years ago,

·south Africa was under

worldwide sanction because of its apartheid policy. A bari

on oil importation forced the

country to convert to alcohol fuel. The- first time George went

there it was to help with South

Africa's alcohol fuel

develop-ment. This was his research

specialty. He remembered

seeing great herds of impalas,

zebras,· and giraffes galloping

in open spaces. Fifteen years

later, there may be fewer animals but more trees.

Travel-ing in a small car, George and

his colleagues were also able to get to different spots than we

were able to this trip.

We did not get to go to

the legislative capital,

Cape-town, a beautiful city, rich with

history. When we returned to Johannesburg, we scheduled

one day's visit to the

admin-·,.

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istrative capital of Pretoria,

. about an hour's drive away.

The Voortrekker Monument on

top of the hill is an impressive

memorial to European pioneers.

Union buildings of Grecian design with gardens

and terraces, completed in

1913, overlook the city and form a magnificent government

. complex. Pretoria must be at its

most beautiful in October

(South Africa's Spring) when all

the jacaranda trees with purple

flowers bloom. We also visited

the house of Paul Kruger, the·

president of the old South African Republic.

We had one day left to

visit Johannesburg before we flew back.

.

r~J-., "If c . . ' ••

United

Airlines

Give us two tickets

to wherever ou

r

luggage is going!

I

ILi)

{LO

nDn

downtown hotel. We worried for them because our tour

guide later told us that

downtown hotels are so unsafe that each guest needs a

policeman for protection.

Do you want the

porter to calJ you

in the morning

,

madame'?

Well, in t

h

at

case, would

you mind

·

waking

.

the

porter'?

No. I'm an

early riser.

One unprofitable hotel was donated to the police for use as a dormitory. Our tour guide did not want to take us to a museum because he was sure his car would be gone when we got out.

a:n

.

lL.lJ

The city was originally a

a:n

gold mining center that grew to

He said the fastest

growing business was the

security business. He drove us to see the beautiful residences

in the finest neighborhoods.

They were all hidden behind

barb-wired fences and security

walls. We ended our day at a flea market. We were most

interested in the-handcrafts.

Carvings of wood objects and stone figures of animals were

for sale at very reasonable

be the largest city in South

Africa. The city has deteriorated

in the last dee-ode, due to

crime. Whites have moved out

to the suburbs from the inner

city. Our travel agent knew to book us in a suburban hotel. However, one couple thought it might be more fun to stay in a

prices. ·

, The city is a study of

extremes and contrasts. The affluent neighborhoods are occupied by extremely rich

· people. On the outskirts of the

city, there are squalid towns of

. tiny shacks. "Soweto" is such an area, offering us an eye

(10)

opening "education".

The political climate is still unstable. Whenever President Nelson Mandela's health is in question, the currency goes down in value. It is a shame that a beautiful country, endowed with rich natural resources can not yet begin on the road to

prosperity. I cannot help.but

wonder if ·education· is the

ultimate answer to South Africa's

problems. Let's hope that

it

does not take a whole

generation to change a culture of crime to a culture of hard

work.

_Q

It has been said that Hong

Kong university students

aren't very religious ...

Well

,

have you ever

listened closely to the

students' mumbling

during mid-term exams?

New Element

Discovered at

HKCJST

!

The heaviest element known to

. science was recently discovered by physicists at HKUST. The element, tentatively named adminiatratium, has no protons or electrons and thus, has an atanic number of O.

However it does have l neutron, 125 assistant neutrons, 75 vice-neutrons and l assistant vice-neutron. This gives it an atanic mass of 212.

These 212 particles are held together in a nucleus by a force that involves the continuous exchange of meson-like particles called morana. Since it has no electrons, administratium is inert. However i t can be detected chemically, since i t impedes every reaction it cares in contact with.

Jls an (amateur) editor I am sometimes asfi..ecf for pointers about writin9 better.

TFte fo{{owin9 are.some tips. 'Eel.

·

How

to

Write Good

• Poofread carefully to

see if you any words

out.

• Avoid run-on sentences

they are hard to read. • Avoid commas, that are,

not necessary.

• No sentence f ragrnents. .

• It. behoves us to avoid

archaisms.

• Also, avoid awkward or

affected alliteration.

• Don't use no double negatives.

• If I've told you once, I 've told you a thousand

times: resist .

hyper-bole.

• Verbs has to agree with

their subjects.

• Avoid trendy locutions

J

that sound flaky.

• Writing carefully,

dangling participles should not be used.

• Kill all exclamation

marks! ! ! !

• Never use a long word when a diminutive one will do.

• Take the bull by the

hand, and · don' t mix

metaphors.

• Don't verb nouns.

• Never, ever use

,repetitive redundancies.

• Last but . not 1·east,

avoid cliches like the plague.

(11)

tPlli£IDil0®

LP®&:ltP

~

For Sale

Stereo Power/Amplifier 'Bryston'

Audiophile component. Please contact: Pete '2?(2358) 8335 (h) or '2?(2358) 6510 (w) ~.k~.1as..LJs.ut ~ ~ kl ~ ~

Slumberlarid Queen size mattress

(still under guarantee) -HK$1,000 Please contact:

Judith '2!' (2358) 8169

Js.ut.k~~Js.ut~~.k~~

Two twin bedspreads (USA) in white/blue.

Please contact: Pearl '2!' 2719 9834

~,k~,.k.!.Js.ut:1,'dt)~ .k.!.~.k.!.

Wooden twin-size bed (frame only

- without mattress). Fits 3' x 6' mattress

- HK$350

Please contact: Julie '2!' (2358) 8166 Js.ut.k.!.~~Js.ut~~.k~~

Two Sanyo kerosene heaters ( one

n~ds a new wick) - HK$500 for the .

pair.

Please contact:

Jeanne 2719 3745

~.k.!.~.lmiJs.ut ~-~.k~~

Crib and accessories - all used for

· less than six months - HK$1,800 including:

- 1 white crib with wheels

- 1 mattress

-1 quilt

- 1 pillow with pillow case

-2 sheets

Please contact: Ke '2? 234 7. 0671

JsN!.. kl ~ .l,a.Js.ut ~-~ kl ~ ~

Clothes drier; 36" ceiling fan;

curtains & blinds; electric

transformer . Please contact: Caroline '2!' 2719 9876 ~.k~~Js.ut ~ ~ . k ¥ ~ Please ·contact: Becky '2!' (235 8) 8120 ~.1m.i~,.k.!.~ ~ ~ .l~L.~.k.!.

.

I suppose you could say that

the

job of

editing Hong

Niao

(12)

uIB£ID[t~(!i

LP®&:Ju1

Wanted

1 Filing Cabinet. · Please contact: Tony '%? (2358) 6177

.bit 1i.e/ ISxlt ~~ kl.~~~~

LP records; 8-track tapes; and

78' s.

Please contact:

Stanley: Email: mk-ckcaa@stu-ust.hk

or

'B' 2694 7790

~~~~~kl~M~.A'.L

We

.

tvoufr{

{if(e

to

.

than(

Jean J-{uc£son

for comp·i{ing this {ist

of items

~itot

,

CattoOU.S"

&

l)to~u.ctton

Maria

Hackett

·Tt/68 ~ (2358) 8266 Eaail •REDBIRD• or IHJ.REDBIRDeusthk.ust.hk•

S•allo• Uei

T7 / 1B 'li' (2358) 2267 Eaoi I ·AcSVUEI•

Ruby

Tsao

.

IHl .Tsaogteao I. co•·

HONG NIAO (REDBIRD) Is a m:mtFify ne.ws(etter

ilstrihuted free to '.JfKJ,JST Settler Staff anri tkir famflts. It Is pubfislid with resources soficltea by n-enixrs of tk

'UWG, anri others. It Is printed on re-cydei papr.r biJ '.ETC.

'Ladi Issue Is ci!strlbuteci 111 the first week_ of wdi mmth Jill mtri(.s sFwu{ci be In writing. .

DEADLINE FOR SUBnISSIOH IS 15th OF EACH noHTH

LAST

WORDS

You ~now

you

an fjdtinfJ o{d

when ...

·~· time flies

-whether you

are having

數據

Updating...

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