Chapter 1 Reification of Boolean Logic

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Chapter 1

Reification of Boolean Logic

The modern era of neural networks began with the pioneer work of McCulloch and Pitts (1943). McCulloch was a psychiatrist and neuroanatomist; he spent some 20 years thinking about the representation of an event in the nervous system. Pitts was a mathematical prodigy, who joined McCulloch in 1942.

The McCulloch-Pitts model of the neuron is shown in Fig. 1. The input xi, for i = 1, 2, …, n, are 0 or 1, depending on the absence or presence of the input impulse at instance k. The output signal of this neuron is denoted as o. The firing rule for this model is defined as follows

⎪⎪

⎪⎪⎨

<

=

= + =

T x w if

T x w if

o n

i k i i n

i k i i k

1 1 1

0 1

Fig. 1. McCulloch-Pitts neuron model, a binary device (1943).

The first paper that refers finite-state machine, AI and recurrent neural network as automaton is written by Kleene (1956).

“Every finite-state machine is equivalent to and can be ‘simulated’ by some neural net. That is, given any finite-state machine, M, we can build a certain neural net NM which, regarded as a black-box machine, will behave precisely like M!” by Minsky (1967).

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Σ

Σ

In Kremer (1995) a formal proof is presented that the simple recurrent network has a computation power as great as that of any finite-state machine.

Although this neuron model is very simplistic, it has substantial computing potential. It can perform the basic logic operations NOT, OR, and AND, with appropriately selected weights and thresholds. As we know, any multivariable combinational function can be implemented using either the NOT and OR, or alternatively the NOT and AND, Boolean operations.

(a)

(b)

+1 -1 x1

x2

W1 = +1

W2 = +1

W0 = -1.5 +1

y

AND

+1 -1 x1

x2

W1 = +1

W2 = +1

W0 = +1.5 +1

y

OR

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Σ Σ

Fig. 2(a)~(c). Neuronal implementation of AND, OR, and MAJ logic functions.

Fig. 3. A two-input neuron.

Fig. 4. Separating line in pattern space.

+1 -1 x1

x2

W1

W2

W0 x0 = +1

y analog output

q binary output

x1

x2

(+1, +1)

(+1, -1) (-1, +1)

(-1, -1)

Separating Line

θ

θ

+1 -1 x1

x3

W1 = +1

W3 = +1

W0 = 0 +1

y x2 MAJ

W2 = +1

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Fig. 3 is a two-input neuron. In pattern space, the neuron can be represented as a separating hyperplane (see Fig. 4). By adjusting the position of the separating line, a single neuron can simulate 14 Boolean functions, except XOR and XNOR (see Fig.

5).

Fig. 5(a). The pattern space and truth table of XOR.

Fig. 5(b). The pattern space and truth table of XNOR.

We need a single hidden layer with two neurons to solve the XOR problem.

x1 x2 XOR -1 -1 -1 -1 1 1 1 -1 1 1 1 -1

x1 x2 XNOR -1 -1 1 -1 1 -1

1 -1 -1 1 1 1 (+1, +1)

θ

(+1, -1)

(-1, +1)

(-1, -1)

θ

(+1, +1)

(+1, -1)

θ

(-1, +1)

θ

(-1, -1)

x1 x2

x1

x2

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Σ

Σ

Σ

Fig. 6(a). The form of a single hidden layer of two neurons and one output neuron.

Fig. 6(b). Separating lines in pattern space of XOR.

(+1, +1)

θ

(+1, -1)

(-1, +1)

(-1, -1)

θ

x1

x2

θ

θ +1

-1 x1

x0 = +1

+1 -1 x2

x0 = +1

x0 = +1

+1 -1

binary output

Neuron2

Neuron1

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We list eight kinds of two-input Boolean function for reference and other functions can be obtained by transfer the sign or inferred from the tips we have.

1.

2.

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4.

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5.

6.

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8.

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In above figures:

(a) Truth Table.

(b) Logic Gates.

(c) Graph Boolean function.

(d) Neural Networks.

(e) Geometrical Perspective on Neural Networks.

(f) η-expansion.

The graph Boolean function is using graph to represent Boolean function. In this graph, if no two adjacent nodes have the same color the output of this function is true, otherwise is false. If xi takes the color Blue it means that the variable is false, color Green is true, and color Red is don’t care. The η-expansion will be explained in chapter 7 and chapter 8.

Fig. 7. The Graph Boolean functions

One neuron can simulate 14 Boolean functions, and we use three neurons to handle XOR and NXOR problem. The three neurons have 143 = 2744 combinations.

However, there are only 16 Boolean functions. Most combinations are duplications.

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0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1

1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1

1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1

Logic

symbol . / ♁ + ↓ ☉ ′ ⊂ ′ ⊃ ↑

Table 1. The inputs, outputs, and logic symbols of all 16 Boolean functions.

F0 Null F8 NOR

F1 AND F9 Equivalence

F2 Inhibition F10 Complement

F3 Transfer F11 Implication

F4 Inhibition F12 Complement

F5 Transfer F13 Implication

F6 Exclusive-OR F14 NAND

F7 OR F15 Identity

Table 2. The names of all 16 Boolean functions.

524

144 144 128 144 128 16

144 144 16

128 144 128 144 144 524

0 100 200 300 400 500 600

F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8 F9 F10 F11 F12 F13 F14 F15

Table 3. The numbers of combinations which make the same Boolean functions.

In three dimensions, binary input patterns occupy the corners of 3-cube. We have 104 methods by using one hyperplane to cut those 8 patterns into two classes.

(1) 0 : 8, 1*2 = 2 methods.

(2) 1 : 7, 8*2 = 16 methods.

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(3) 2 : 6, 12*2 = 24 methods.

(4) 3 : 5, 8*3*2 = 48 methods.

(5) 4 : 4, 3*2 + 8 = 14 methods.

So, one neuron can simulate 104 Boolean functions with three dimensions inputs.

We try to use the same method to generate all 256 Boolean functions. But we find that using only three neurons (104*104*14) can not handle functions x1♁x2♁x3 and ~(x1

♁x2♁x3).

Fig. 2. The 3-2-1 neural networks and the Boolean function this network can’t handle.

We reuse 3-3-1 architecture (1044 combinations) to generate 256 Boolean functions and construct the following table.

0 1000000 2000000 3000000 4000000 5000000 6000000 7000000 8000000 9000000 10000000

F0 F14 F29 F44 F59 F74 F89 F104 F119 F134 F149 F164 F179 F194 F209 F224 F239 F254

Table 4. The numbers of combinations which make the same Boolean functions with three dimension inputs.

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F0 8751200 F1 1457568 F2 1457568 F4 1457568 F8 1457568 F16 1457568 F32 1457568 F64 1457568 F127 1457568 F3 926736 F5 926736 F10 926736 F12 926736 F17 926736 F34 926736 F48 926736 F63 926736 F68 926736 F80 926736 F95 926736 F119 926736 F15 888864 F51 888864 F85 888864 F7 628368 F11 628368 F13 628368 F14 628368 F19 628368 F21 628368 F31 628368 F35 628368 F42 628368

F47 628368 F49 628368 F50 628368 F55 628368 F59 628368 F69 628368 F76 628368 F79 628368 F81 628368 F84 628368 F87 628368 F93 628368 F112 628368 F115 628368 F117 628368 F23 601872 F43 601872 F77 601872 F113 601872 F6 205920 F9 205920 F18 205920 F20 205920 F33 205920 F40 205920 F65 205920 F72 205920 F96 205920 F111 205920 F123 205920 F125 205920 F27 157344 F29 157344

F39 157344 F46 157344 F53 157344 F58 157344 F71 157344 F78 157344 F83 157344 F92 157344 F114 157344 F116 157344 F24 58368 F36 58368 F66 58368 F126 58368 F25 56112 F26 56112 F28 56112 F37 56112 F38 56112 F44 56112 F52 56112 F56 56112 F61 56112 F62 56112 F67 56112 F70 56112 F74 56112 F82 56112 F88 56112 F91 56112 F94 56112 F98 56112 F100 56112

F103 56112 F110 56112 F118 56112 F122 56112 F124 56112 F30 43968 F45 43968 F54 43968 F57 43968 F75 43968 F86 43968 F89 43968 F99 43968 F101 43968 F106 43968 F108 43968 F120 43968 F22 31200 F41 31200 F73 31200 F97 31200 F104 31200 F107 31200 F109 31200 F121 31200 F60 28512 F90 28512 F102 28512 F105 3360

Table 5. The detailed data of Table 4. F128~F255 are the same as F127~F0.

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So far, we observe how algebra, geometry, linear algebra, Boolean algebra, and neural networks combined together. Neural networks utilize geometry and linear algebra to solve the problem of Boolean algebra. In Boolean algebra, we tend to use +‧~ → ≣ … those operator to solve problems. In neural networks, we use hyperplane to cut space to find the solution. For example, if we want to implement this truth table:

We may write down

ABCD D

ABC D

C AB CD B A D C B A BCD A

F = + + + + + ,

and use Boolean theorems to simplify this expression or use K-map method directly to get

F = AC + BCD + ABD.

Then use logic gate to implement this Boolean function.

AB

(You can find more information about Gate Logic or K-map Method from “Contemporary Logic Design”, written by Randy H. Katz, or other logic design books.)

On the other hand, we use all the information from truth table (as training patterns) to find a hyperplane that separates patterns correctly. The hyperplane we find is 7.1651*A + 3.6203*B + 7.1653*C + 3.6203*D - 3.6196 = 0 (we use –1 in place of 0 to train the networks). Note that if patterns are not specified in truth table, their value can be either +1 or 0 (-1) for us to obtain the applicable Boolean expression.

We may say the neural network have the global sense, because it uses information from all patterns to find the decision hyperplane. However, Boolean algebra must parse the truth table one by one and use +‧~ → ≣ … these operators we are familiar with to construct a Boolean expression. The Boolean function corresponding to the hyperplane in neural networks may be strange, and hard for us to understand. On the other hand, it has the freedom to find the solution without the limit A B C D F

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1

00 01 11 10 00 0 0 0 0 01 0 0 1 0 11 0 1 1 1 10 0 0 1 1 CD

The K-map.

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The variables x1 xi and operators + ~ can express all Boolean functions. For one neuron, if it has two inputs, it can’t implement two functions - XOR and XNOR; if it has three inputs, it can’t implement 152 functions in all 256 Boolean functions. As input dimensions increase the capability of one neuron is decreasing (2D:

8 1 162 = , 3D:

2 1

152 > ). We may consider that Boolean algebra is more powerful than neural 256 networks. Compare neuronal model equation y=σ (

wixi +w0) with Boolean expressions only using operators + and ~:

Y = a1X1 + a2X2 + a3X3 + …. + anXn, ai = ~ or empty string, Xi = 1 or 0.

Notice that Xi only appears once in above equation. The neuronal model equation can replace Boolean expression by w0 = 0, wi = +1 or -1, σ(x) = x and xi = 1 or 0.

Furthermore, wi is real number and function σ(‧) can be any proper function. So, )

( wx w0

y=σ

i i + is more powerful than Y = a1X1 + a2X2 + a3X3 + …. + anXn, ai

= ~ or empty string, Xi = 1 or 0. On the other hand, the above Boolean expression can’t construct all Boolean functions without adding the nest form. Comparatively, neural networks need multilayer constructions to implement all Boolean functions.

From above, neural networks are more powerful than Boolean algebra.

Exercises

1.1 (a) Design a feedforward network to divide the black dots from other corners with fewest neurons and layers. Please specify the values of weights and thresholds.

(b) Is it possible to do (a) with a single neuron? Why?

100

001 011 101

000 111

010 110

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1.2 Consider the neural network in Fig. P1. The value of each neuron can be 0 or 1 and the activation function used is f (net) = {1, net>0; 0, net<0}. Each neuron decides its own value according to the values of neighbors. We can adjust the weights of neurons so that every neuron will have distinct set of action rules (e.g.

{000|0, 001|1, …, 111|0} is a set of action rules). If two neurons that have different sets of action rules are considered to be different kinds, then, how many kinds of neurons can we have in the network?

1.3 Design a feedforward network which provides the classification of the following pattern vectors:

Class 1:

X = [0 0 0 0 ]t, [0 0 1 0 ]t, [0 0 1 1 ]t, [0 1 0 0 ]t, [0 1 0 1 ]t, [0 1 1 0 ]t, [0 1 1 1 ]t, [1 0 1 0 ]t, [1 1 0 0 ]t, [1 1 1 0 ]t, [1 1 1 1 ]t

Class 2:

X = [0 0 0 1 ]t, [1 0 0 0 ]t, [1 0 0 1 ]t, [1 0 1 1 ]t, [1 1 0 1 ]t

Please specify the value of weights and thresholds and use as few neurons and layers as possible.

1.4 Please refer to p.217 in “Introduction to Artificial Neural Systems” by Jacek M.

Zurada.

M(J, n) = 2J, n ≧ J.

Is it enough to use J neurons as hidden layer to represent all 22n Boolean functions when n = J?

1.5 To compare neural model equation y = σ(Σ wixi + w0) with Boolean equations which use only operators ∩, ∪ and ~.

(1) List all different Boolean equations in the forms as follows.

(a) Y = a1X1 ∪ a2X2 ∪ a3X3. (b) Y = a1X1 ∩ a2X2 ∩ a3X3. (c) Y = a1X1 ∪ a2X2 ∩ a3X3. (d) Y = a1X1 ∩ a2X2 ∪ a3X3.

(a1, a2, a3 can be ~ or empty string.)

Fig. P1.

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didn’t. (Hint: You can use the 3-cube to represent Boolean equations) (2) We have five methods to cut the cube to get the 104 functions. For each

cutting method, write a corresponding Boolean equation in the forms given above.

1.6 We have these training patterns:

0: (0, 0, 0), (0, 1, 1), (1, 1, 0) 1: (0, 1, 0), (1, 0, 0), (1, 1, 1).

The training result:

⎥⎥

⎢⎢

=

4.0 2.0 - 2.5

0.37 3.7 - 2.5

1.0 - 1.5 0.9 - W1

[

5 6 6

]

2 =

WBias1 =

[

-0.95 -2.0 -3.1

]

Bias2 = -3

(1) Write the Boolean function of training patterns. (Make simplification)

(2) Write the nested Boolean function of the network architecture for each neuron. Notice that the Boolean function you wrote must be in the forms given in problem 1.

(3) Prove that function (1) and (2) are equivalent.

(4) (0, 0, 1) and (1, 0, 1) didn’t appear in training patterns. So, we can get four different Boolean functions. Please choose the simplest Boolean function and compare it with the output of the above neural network of these two patterns.

1.7 Training patterns:

(1) Write the Boolean function.

(You must make simplification) (2) Design a 3-2-1 neural network

to classify these patterns. If it cannot classify these patterns correctly, construct your own neural network to classify these patterns.

1.8 Boolean functions and neural network have a one to one map in architecture.

Please find the map and make a description of it.

Hint: )y =(x1∧¬x2x3)∨¬(x1x2x3 can map to this neural network bias

bias

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1.9 Find the coloring graph solution for x1x2x3 =Y . Remember x1x2x3 =Yis,

coloring graph is similar to that in page 79

“Turing Machines” by J. E. Hopcroft, 70-80.

1.10 Proposition: The Boolean function is defined as: there are six Boolean variables as input (x1, x2, …, x6) of this function, the output of this function is 1 only when any two variables are 1, (more than two variables or less than two variables are 1, the output of this function is 0.)

(a) Use Boolean algebra or Boolean function to express this proposition.

(b) Write a program (Turing machine, Lisp, C, or other programs) to simulate this expression, the input of the program is these six Boolean variables, the output of the program is according to the proposition.

(c) Discuss the trained weights of the multilayer network in homework for the above proposition. Can you figure out the meaning of those weights?

(d) Construct a multilayer network for this proposition. Use six neurons in input layer and one neuron in output layer.

1.11 In class we discussed a neuron with two Boolean variables as input. This neuron can simulate 14 Boolean functions (14 Boolean states) excluding the XOR.

Assume the neuron is in state Si, which is one of the 14 Boolean functions. When we slightly tune the weights w1 w2 w3 of this neuron the current state Si will change to Sj first. Discuss all possible such first Sj when this neuron is in Si for all 14 states, i = 1~14.

1.12 Write an algorithm to train the neural network in problem 2 by its training y

x1 x2 x3

1 1 1 1

1 -1

1 -1 2

2 3

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subroutine:

train_one_neuron( x, d, w, y, Δw) input: x, d, w. output: y, Δw.

x: an array of the input value.

d: a desire output.

w: the weights.

y: the output.

Δw: an array of the value of the weights should be added.

1.13 In appendix A we showed a modular design method for training ANN on data flow machine. Each neuron’s desire response

is inducted from choosing bipolar sigmoid function 1 1

) 2

( −

= + −u u e

σ . Please try to formalize the desire response when we choose unipolar sigmoid function

e u

u

= + 1 ) 1 σ(

1.14 Discuss and analyze the results obtained in training a 1-3-2 ANN. You can use the following results or your own results. The input is a continues number between 0 to 1 and output is a ‘S’ curve in the 2D plane.

0

0.5

1 0

0.2 0.4

0.6 0.8

1 0

0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

011

010 111

110 001

000 101

100

-10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2

-2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12

000 001 010 011

100 101 110 111

1.15 (a) A dataflow information processing architecture is a MIMD architecture without global or shared memory in which each processing element only operates when all of the necessary information that it needs to function has arrive. Show that neural networks are dataflow architectures.

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(b) Invent a concrete, detailed example of a dataflow architecture that is not a neural network.

1.16 We have learned basic type of neural network:

We can directly use it to simulate Boolean logic. For example: OR Boolean function: y=x1 OR x2, where x1, x2, y are Boolean variables having values {0,1}.

When above network use ‘hardlim’ active function, its output y=x1 OR x2.

Another example is AND Boolean function: y=x1 AND ¬x2

Please check the truth table for it by yourself and answer questions below:

(a) Draw the neural network that perform:

Note: the weights and bias should be {-1,1} for simplicity.

(b) Draw the neural network that peform:

Note: the weights and bias should be {-1,1} for simplicity.

(a) Can you formalize how to set up the weights and biases for a given OR expression?

(b) Can you formalize how to set up the weights and biases for a given AND expression?

(c) Try to use a 3-layers neural network for simulating the DNF equation:

) ( ∑

=1

+

=

n

i

w

i

x

i

f

y θ

( x 1 x 2 x 3 x 4 )

y = ∨ ¬ ∨ ∨ ¬

( x 1 x 2 x 3 x 4 )

y = ∧ ¬ ∧ ∧

⎟⎠

⎜ ⎞

⎝⎛ ∧ ∧

¬

⎟∨

⎠⎞

⎜⎝

⎛ ∧¬ ∧

= x1 x2 x3 x3 x4 x5 y

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It can simulate many kinds of dynamic process like gene regulation and etc. If n Boolean variables x1, x2, … , xn are changed by time and its value are known for a period of time. We can build ANN model like above for these n-variables.

Please try to build an ANN model for the given 4-variables.

Time x1 x2 x3 x4

1 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 4 1 1 1 1 5 0 1 1 0 6 1 1 0 0 7 1 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 1 (Hint: first rewrite x1= F(x1, x2, x3, x4) and get its DNF)

Figure

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