Citizenship and Social Development Curriculum and Assessment Guide (Secondary 4 - 6)

84  Download (0)

Full text

(1)

Citizenship and Social Development Curriculum and Assessment Guide

(Secondary 4 - 6)

Jointly prepared by the Curriculum Development Council and the Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment Authority

Published for use in schools by the Education Bureau HKSARG

2021

Effective from Secondary 4 in the 2021/22 school year

(2)

Contents

Page

Preamble 1

Chapter 1 Introduction 3

1.1 Background 3

1.2 Curriculum Rationale 4

1.3 Curriculum Aims 5

1.4 Broad Learning Outcomes 6

1.5 Interface with Basic Education and Post-secondary Pathways 7

Chapter 2 Curriculum Framework 8

2.1 Design Principles 8

2.2 The Overall Structure 8

2.3 Basic Design of Curriculum Framework 13 2.4 Detailed Explanation of the Curriculum Content 15

2.4.1 Theme 1: Hong Kong under “One Country, Two Systems”

15 2.4.2 Theme 2: Our Country since Reform and Opening-up 20 2.4.3 Theme 3: Interconnectedness and Interdependence of the Contemporary World

24

2.5 Mainland Study Tour 28

2.5.1 Expected learning outcomes 28

2.5.2 Framework 29

2.5.3 Arrangement of Mainland study tour 30 2.5.4 Project learning of Mainland study tour 31 2.5.5 Learning time before and after the tour 31

2.6 Time Allocation 31

Chapter 3 Curriculum Planning 33

3.1 Guiding Principles 33

3.2 Curriculum Leadership and Co-ordination 34

3.2.1 Curriculum planning 34

3.2.2 Curriculum co-ordination, support and management 35 3.2.3 Facilitating professional development 36 3.2.4 Developing, selecting and adapting learning and

teaching resources

37

3.3 Learning Progression 38

Chapter 4 Learning and Teaching 40

4.1 Subject-based Knowledge Construction 40

4.1.1 Subject knowledge 40

4.1.2 Generic skills and thinking tools 41

(3)

4.1.3 Values education 41

4.2 Guiding Principles 42

4.3 Learning and Teaching Strategies 43

4.3.1 Choosing appropriate strategies 44

4.3.2 Connecting other learning experiences and life-wide learning opportunities

49

4.3.3 Catering for learner diversity 49

4.4 Interactions 51

4.4.1 Roles and interactions of students and teachers 51

4.4.2 Classroom assessment 51

4.4.3 Teachers’ debriefings 51

4.5 Learning Communities 52

4.5.1 Co-construction of knowledge in a learning community 52 4.5.2 Developing each student's potential in a learning

community

4.5.3 Information and communication technology (ICT) and learning communities

53 53 4.6 Mainland Study Tour and Related Project Learning 53

4.6.1 Building on prior experiences 53

4.6.2 Mainland study tour 54

4.6.3 Project learning 55

Chapter 5 Assessment 57

5.1 The Roles of Assessment 57

5.2 Formative and Summative Assessment 57

5.3 Assessment Objectives 58

5.4 Internal Assessment 59

5.4.1 Guiding principles 59

5.4.2 Diversified internal assessment practices 60

5.5 Public Assessment 61

5.5.1 Guiding principles 61

5.5.2 Assessment design 62

5.5.3 Public examinations 62

5.5.4 Standards and reporting of results 64

Chapter 6 Learning and Teaching Resources 65

6.1 Purposes and Functions of Learning and Teaching Resources 65

6.2 Guiding Principles 66

6.3 Commonly Used Resources 67

6.3.1 Learning and teaching resources provided by the EDB 67

6.3.2 Textbooks 67

6.3.3 Government departments and non-government organisations

68 6.3.4 Information from the Internet and social media 68

6.3.5 Mass media 69

6.3.6 Community resources 69

6.4 Flexible Use of Learning and Teaching Resources 70

(4)

6.4.1 Aligning with curriculum aims and learning objectives 70

6.4.2 Catering for learner diversity 70

6.4.3 Use of Chinese and English learning and teaching resources

71

6.5 Resource Management 71

Appendix

Suggestions on Schools’ Planning for the Mainland Study Tour of Citizenship and Social Development

73

Membership of the CDC-HKEAA Committee on Citizenship and Social Development

80

(5)

Preamble

This Curriculum and Assessment (C&A) Guide, jointly prepared by the Curriculum Development Council (CDC) and the Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment Authority (HKEAA) in 2021, is based on the goals of senior secondary education and on other official curriculum and assessment documents, including the Basic Education Curriculum Guide (2002), the Basic Education Curriculum Guide – To Sustain, Deepen and Focus on Learning to Learn (2014), the Senior Secondary Curriculum Guide (2009) and the Secondary Education Curriculum Guide (2017).

It is published for use in schools at the senior secondary level and should be read in conjunction with all related documents.

The CDC is an advisory body that gives recommendations to the Government of the HKSAR on all matters relating to curriculum development for the school system from the kindergarten level to the senior secondary level. Its membership includes heads of schools, practising teachers, parents, employers, academics from tertiary institutions, professionals from related fields/bodies, representatives from the HKEAA and the Vocational Training Council, as well as officers from the Education Bureau.

The HKEAA is an independent statutory body responsible for the conduct of public assessment, including the assessment for the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE). Its governing council includes members from the school sector, tertiary institutions and government bodies, as well as professionals and members of the business community. The subject curriculum forms the basis of the assessment designed and administered by the HKEAA. In this connection, the HKEAA will issue a handbook to provide information on the rules and regulations of the HKDSE Examination as well as the framework and format of the public assessment for each subject.

The CDC and HKEAA will keep the subject curriculum under constant review and evaluation in the light of classroom experiences, student performance in the public assessment, and the changing needs of students and society. All comments and suggestions on this C&A Guide can be sent to:

Chief Curriculum Development Officer (Liberal Studies / Citizenship and Social Development)

Curriculum Development Institute Education Bureau

(6)

Room 1321, Wu Chung House 213 Queen’s Road East

Wanchai, Hong Kong Fax: 2573 5299

E-mail: liberalstudies@edb.gov.hk / cs@edb.gov.hk

(7)

Chapter 1 Introduction

This chapter provides the background, curriculum rationale and aims, and broad learning outcomes of Citizenship and Social Development as a core subject in the three-year senior secondary curriculum.

1.1 Background

Senior secondary Citizenship and Social Development is formerly Liberal Studies.

There has been ongoing controversy over Liberal Studies in society since its implementation. To optimise student learning, the Government set up the Task Force on Review of School Curriculum (Task Force) in 2017 to holistically review the primary and secondary curricula, covering the arrangements for the four senior secondary core subjects (including Liberal Studies). After nearly three years of work, the Task Force submitted its review report entitled “Optimise the curriculum for the future, Foster whole-person development and diverse talents” to the Education Bureau (EDB) on 22 September 2020, putting forward six directional recommendations. As regards the controversy over Liberal Studies, having thoroughly considered the recommendations set out in the review report and the concerns of the community, the EDB announced the direction of reform for Liberal Studies in November 2020.

Under the principle of “Led by Professionals”, the relevant committees under the Curriculum Development Council (CDC) and the Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment Authority (HKEAA) continued to follow up on the details of the reform, including conducting the school questionnaire survey, school briefing sessions and teacher focus group meetings, and put forward optimising proposals to the EDB. The EDB accepted the optimising proposal of the reform on Liberal Studies, and issued a circular memorandum (EDB Circular Memorandum No. 39/2021) to schools on 1 April 2021 to announce the details about the optimising measures, including renaming the subject Citizenship and Social Development in lieu of Liberal Studies; keeping the subject compulsory for public assessment; reporting the results of the public examination as “Attained” and “Unattained” to release students’ examination pressure;

stating clearly the important learning concepts to strengthen the coverage of knowledge, so as to build a solid knowledge base for students; reorganising and reducing the curriculum content, including lesson time, to cover about half of the original so as to free up space for student learning; removing “Independent Enquiry Study” (IES) to reduce the workload of both teachers and students; attaching importance to cultivating students’ positive values and attitudes, sense of national identity, and their learning about national development, the Constitution, the Basic

(8)

Law and the rule of law; broadening students’ international perspectives, helping them connect knowledge across different subjects, developing their critical thinking skills and teaching them to analyse contemporary topics in a rational manner through studying important topics related to Hong Kong, the country and global developments;

providing Mainland study opportunities for students to gain a first-hand understanding of our country and its development; and putting in place a Recommended Textbook List for the subject. Citizenship and Social Development will be implemented at Secondary 4 from the 2021/22 school year. The circular memorandum issued to schools on 1 April 2021 also includes the optimising proposals of the other three senior secondary core subjects (i.e. Chinese Language, English Language and Mathematics), with a view to jointly creating space for senior secondary students and catering for learner diversity.

Citizenship and Social Development aims to help students develop a broad knowledge base and foster their sense of national identity with global perspective through studying topics related to Hong Kong, the country and the contemporary world. It enables students to develop multiple perspectives as well as understand the roles and interplay among individuals, society, the country and the world through studying different topics in the areas of economy, science, technology, environmental protection, sustainable development, public health, etc. This subject should complement with other senior secondary subjects to enable students to integrate and apply cross-disciplinary knowledge and skills. On the evidence-driven basis, coupled with a good grasp of the subject knowledge, students should be able to have a holistic and accurate understanding of the situation and development of Hong Kong, the country and the contemporary world. This subject also aims to enhance students’

critical thinking, rational analysis and problem solving skills, as well as develop positive values and attitudes. Students are expected to apply these in daily life and become informed and responsible citizens with a sense of national identity and global perspective. These are the competencies for students to live and work in the 21st century.

1.2 Curriculum Rationale

Citizenship and Social Development adheres to the rationale of the senior secondary Liberal Studies curriculum. The curriculum emphasises helping senior secondary students understand the situations of Hong Kong, the country and the contemporary world, as well as their pluralistic and interdependent nature. Through the learning process, students can connect the knowledge learnt in various subjects at the junior and senior secondary levels, and understand, study and explore different topics from

(9)

multiple perspectives, so as to construct more knowledge relevant to various themes and build up a more solid knowledge base. Furthermore, students can understand the complexities, major considerations and priorities involved in the topics, decision-making process and different solutions to problems, in order to help students:

(a) acquire a broad knowledge base, and understand contemporary issues that may affect their daily life at personal, community, national and global levels;

(b) become informed and responsible citizens with a sense of national identity and global perspective;

(c) respect pluralism of cultures and views, and become critical, rational, reflective and independent thinkers; and

(d) acquire skills necessary to life-long learning, and be confident in facing future challenges.

1.3 Curriculum Aims

The aims of Citizenship and Social Development are to help students:

(a) enhance understanding of society, the country, the human world, the physical environment and related knowledge;

(b) develop multiple perspectives on contemporary mature topics in different contexts (e.g. cultural, social, economic, political and technological contexts);

(c) become independent thinkers; be able to adapt to the ever-changing personal, social, national and global circumstances and construct knowledge; understand the complexities of the topics, and the challenges and processes involved in decision-making for making law-abiding, rational and affective analysis, and learning how to handle conflicting values;

(d) inherit Chinese culture and heritage in a pluralistic society, deepen understanding and sense of identity of individuals with Chinese nationality and Chinese citizenship, and at the same time appreciate, respect and embrace diversity in cultures and views;

(e) develop skills relevant to life-long learning and strengthen their ability to integrate and apply knowledge and skills, including critical thinking skills, creativity, problem solving skills, communication skills, collaboration skills, data management skills, self-management skills, self-learning skills, and information technology skills;

(f) develop positive values and attitudes towards life, so that they can become informed and responsible citizens of society, the country and the world.

(10)

1.4 Broad Learning Outcomes

Through studying the subject, students should be able to:

(a) understand the constitutional basis of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, its relationship with the country and the latest development of the country, so as to explore the opportunities and challenges of the interactive development between Hong Kong and the Mainland;

(b) understand the contemporary mature topics related to individuals, society, the country, the human world and the physical environment, so as to construct knowledge and promote self-directed learning;

(c) understand the interplay among individuals, society, the country and the world in relation to the environmental, economic and social development through studying the topics of common human concerns covered in the curriculum framework, and based on the above understanding to explore how to resolve difficulties, promote development and reap mutual benefits;

(d) develop a sense of national identity with global perspective, and understand the interconnectedness among areas of economy, science, technology, sustainable development, public health, etc., as well as the development of the contemporary world and the related impact; and recognise the roles of Hong Kong, the country, and the international community;

(e) identify different views and the values behind various topics; and apply in an integrative manner critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, creativity, data management skills and self-learning skills in examining the background, content, developmental trends and the values of the topics from multiple perspectives, so as to make law-abiding, rational and affective judgements and decisions based on facts and evidence; as well as develop positive values and attitudes;

(f) present arguments clearly based on facts and evidence, demonstrate objective, fair and empathetic attitudes towards the opinions and views held by other people;

(g) understand, appreciate and inherit Chinese culture and treat other cultures with respect, receptiveness and appreciation, and become responsible and committed citizens.

(11)

1.5 Interface with Basic Education and Post-secondary Pathways

The design of the Citizenship and Social Development curriculum is built on the learning outcomes in basic education at the primary and junior secondary levels, including the knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired from the Key Learning Areas of Personal, Social and Humanities Education, Science Education, and Technology Education. Through the study of contemporary topics, students further broaden their knowledge and develop their generic skills, including critical thinking skills, problem solving skills and independent thinking skills, which equip them for lifelong learning and future development. The curriculum provides Mainland study opportunities for students to gain a first-hand understanding of our country’s development, and widen their horizons. Such experience lays a solid academic foundation for students’ further studies at the tertiary level, and is of benefit to students in their exploration of different pathways for further studies and future careers. In addition, this subject helps students cultivate civic literacy, social awareness, knowledge and analytical ability, which enable them to learn effectively and make wise decisions in the ever-changing and challenging environment.

(12)

Chapter 2 Curriculum Framework

This chapter explains the design principles underlying the curriculum framework for Citizenship and Social Development, the themes, topics and learning focuses of the subject, as well as the arrangements for the Mainland study tour.

2.1 Design Principles

With reference to the Secondary Education Curriculum Guide and other related curriculum documents, the design principles of this curriculum are as follows:

(a) The Citizenship and Social Development curriculum is built on the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes, and learning experiences expected of students in the basic education. Students’ learning in the eight Key Learning Areas (KLA) and their exposure to the five Essential Learning Experiences at the junior secondary level provide them with the necessary knowledge base and capacity for their learning in Citizenship and Social Development.

(b) Through studying topics based on different contexts, the curriculum emphasises integration and application of what have learnt, and broadening and deepening the knowledge base of every student by means of enquiry and reflection.

(c) The curriculum helps students understand the topics that are of concern to society, the country and the contemporary world through exposure to related knowledge as well as thinking and analysing from different perspectives. The curriculum also helps students transfer and apply the knowledge and skills gained to other topics, and continue to explore topics that interest them in an open-minded manner.

(d) The curriculum emphasises adopting different learning and teaching strategies, taking into account students’ abilities and learning needs, to cater for learner diversity, facilitate effective learning and unleash students’ potential.

(e) The knowledge, skills, positive values and attitudes developed in Citizenship and Social Development help prepare students for different pathways, including further studies, training and employment.

2.2 The Overall Structure

The curriculum comprises three themes, namely “Hong Kong under ‘One Country, Two Systems’”, “Our Country since Reform and Opening-up” and

“Interconnectedness and Interdependence of the Contemporary World”. They serve as platforms for students to explore related topics for a more coherent understanding of

(13)

the situations of society, the country and the contemporary world. Students should also participate in the Mainland study tour, as it is an integral part of the curriculum of Citizenship and Social Development. Details on the arrangements for the Mainland study tour are given in Chapter 4.

The theme of “Hong Kong under ‘One Country, Two Systems’” mainly explains the relationship between the country and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region since Hong Kong’s return to the motherland. It helps students understand the meaning of “one country, two systems”, the constitutional basis founded upon the Constitution and the Basic Law, as well as enhances their understanding of the latest development of the country for cultivating a sense of national identity. “Our Country since Reform and Opening-up” helps students understand the development process of the country from domestic and international aspects. “Interconnectedness and Interdependence of the Contemporary World” addresses the topics of economy, technology, sustainable development and public health, helping students widen their horizons through understanding the situations facing humankind in the contemporary world. The Mainland study tour provides opportunities for students to gain a first-hand understanding of the development of our country and people’s life. The table below shows the curriculum framework for Citizenship and Social Development:

Curriculum Framework for Citizenship and Social Development:

Theme Topic Learning Focus

1 Hong Kong under

“One Country, Two Systems”

(45–50 hours)

The meaning and

implementation of “one

country, two systems”

Brief introduction to the origin of the question of Hong Kong (the three unequal treaties and the background) and the process of Hong Kong’s return to China

Constitutional relationship between the country and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) (China has indisputable sovereignty and jurisdiction over Hong Kong), legal basis of “one country, two systems” and the Basic Law

Significance of safeguarding national security (i.e. a holistic approach to national security); the National Security Law and promoting long-term development of Hong Kong; and striking the balance between rule of law and human rights

Political structure of the HKSAR

(14)

Theme Topic Learning Focus

Significance of rule of law:

law-abidingness; judicial independence;

equality before the law; fair and open trial

Fundamental rights and duties of Hong Kong residents as stipulated in the Basic Law

Situation of the country and sense of

national identity

Brief introduction to the contemporary situation of the country: political structure of the country; composition of the Chinese nation; concept of Chinese nationality and Chinese citizens

The national symbols (national flag, national emblem, national anthem) and stipulations as stated in Annex III to the Basic Law

Achievements of the country in different areas in recent years (new high-end technologies, medical care and public health, culture and education, infrastructures, poverty eradication)

Benefits and contributions of the HKSAR’s participation in national affairs:

benefits: the country’s policies supporting the development of Hong Kong; enabling Hong Kong to have the advantage of “one country, two systems”

contributions: Hong Kong promoting the development of and exchange with the Mainland in different areas; donations for natural disasters and supporting the needs of the developing regions of the Mainland

Characteristics of cultural diversity of the Hong Kong society

Factors shaping the characteristics of cultural diversity with Chinese culture as the mainstay in the Hong Kong society: brief introduction to the development of Hong Kong, the impact of Chinese traditional culture integrating with different cultures on the Hong Kong society

Positive significance of the characteristics of cultural diversity to

(15)

Theme Topic Learning Focus

the Hong Kong society: promoting inclusion of cultures, facilitating cultural innovations and reflections, promoting harmony among different ethnic groups, nurturing citizenship rooted in Chinese culture with a global perspective

2 Our Country since Reform and Opening-up (45–50 hours)

Change in people’s life and overall national strength

Brief introduction to the development of China’s reform and opening-up (key stages) and related strategies

Changes and enhancement of people’s quality of life (income, mode of consumption, educational level, standard of medical care, life expectancy, poverty eradication, etc.)

Enhancement of overall national strength (economy, culture, natural resources, education, technology, national defence, etc.)

The

development of our country and the

integration of Hong Kong into the overall national

development

The focuses and policies of the recent Five-Year Plans of our country, and the connection of these focuses and policies with the promotion of the development of our country and Hong Kong

The development plans and policies related to Hong Kong (the development of the Greater Bay Area, The Mainland and Hong Kong Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA)) and the relationship with the promotion of the development of Hong Kong

Participation in international affairs

The notion of multifaceted diplomacy since the 21st century

Actions and initiatives: rescues of various nature and assistance to other countries; setting up international organisations and organising international forums; the Belt and Road Initiative

Impact of participation in international affairs on the country’s overall development, and the active role played by Hong Kong

3 Interconnectedness and

Interdependence

Economic globalisation

Interdependence of economies of all countries and cooperation of international economic organisations;

(16)

Theme Topic Learning Focus of the

Contemporary World

(45–50 hours)

development of multinational corporations, global labour and financial market integration;

development of new economies and the impact on individuals (consumption and employment) and the development of Hong Kong and our country

Technological development and information literacy

Brief introduction to the latest technological development around the world: artificial intelligence, big data, cloud storage of data

Development features of information technology: the Internet, social networking sites, instant messaging software

Relationship between information literacy and positive values; identifying false information; morals and conduct in using technologies; observing the relevant laws

Sustainable development

The rationale of sustainable development and the practical experiences of environmental conservation of our country, Hong Kong and other regions

The roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders in promoting environmental conservation

Public health and human health

Functions and roles of the World Health Organization in global public health matters

Contributions of our country and Hong Kong to global public health (particularly in preventing and controlling infectious diseases)

Individuals’ responsibilities in promoting public health (particularly in responding to infectious diseases)

(17)

Mainland Study Tour (Not involving public assessment)

Theme Topic Learning Focus

Chinese Culture and Modern Life (10-hour learning time)1

Nature of traditional Chinese culture

Online self-learning of articles introducing the special characteristics of traditional Chinese culture

Conservation and inheritance of cultural heritage (including tangible and intangible cultural heritage), including applying technology in conservation works

Introduction to the Mainland study tour

Study tour to the Mainland to experience the conservation and inheritance of Chinese culture in society

Detailed planning and reading information before the study tour

Methods of on-site collection of information

Study tour report drafting requirements

2.3 Basic Design of Curriculum Framework

The curriculum framework for this subject covers the themes of Hong Kong, the country and the contemporary world, enabling students to gradually widen their horizons. Teachers should plan the curriculum in accordance with the sequence of the themes prescribed in the curriculum throughout the three years of study at the senior secondary level. All themes should be addressed in line with the framework of the Constitution and the Basic Law to help students acquire the knowledge base of “one country, two systems”.

The various topics under each theme are selected for students to study. They are related to different areas of the themes with positive values and attitudes incorporated so as to deepen students’ understanding of these themes. Suggested lesson time is also ______________________

1 The notion of “learning time” was stated in the Task Force on Review of School Curriculum Final Report. It includes lesson time, the time outside class at school as well as the time spent outside school including holidays. The “learning time” stated in this Guide is based on the same notion stated in that report. Based on their schools’ situations, teachers can holistically plan the curriculum and make arrangements for students to conduct different learning activities before and after the Mainland study tour using the notion of “learning time”. (Task Force on Review of School Curriculum Final Report (September 2020), pp.13-14.)

(18)

provided for the themes to delineate the scope of enquiry and ensure alignment with the total lesson time of the curriculum.

There are related “learning focuses” under each topic, indicating the breadth and depth of learning and teaching, and the possible perspectives and directions for exploration, thereby helping teachers and students understand the curriculum content and adopt appropriate learning and teaching strategies for enhancing the effectiveness of learning and teaching. Teachers should appropriately facilitate students’ learning with reference to the content of “learning focuses” as well as students’ interest and abilities. Reference materials for teachers and students are also provided on the

“Web-based Resource Platform” developed by the EDB.

(19)

2.4 Detailed Explanation of the Curriculum Content 2.4.1 Hong Kong under “One Country, Two Systems”

Introduction

Hong Kong is a Chinese society with the roots grounded in Chinese culture.

Economically, Hong Kong has developed into an international financial and commercial centre and ranks among the world’s metropolises. In recent times, the integration of the Chinese and the Western cultures has formed Hong Kong’s unique culture and social ethos. After the return to the motherland, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, which has been established in accordance with the Constitution and comes directly under the Central People’s Government, is granted a high degree of autonomy to maintain Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability.

The Constitution and the Basic Law together constitute the constitutional order of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and stipulate various systems of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Under the principle of “one country, two systems”, after Hong Kong’s return to China, Hong Kong continues to develop into an international metropolis based on its previous economic foundation and way of living;

on the other hand, it also acts as a special administrative region of the country. When studying this theme, students are expected to learn from the meaning and implementation of “one country, two systems”, understand the close relationship between the country and Hong Kong, enhance their national identity through further understanding of the situation of the country, and learn the multicultural characteristics of Hong Kong society from the cultural development perspective.

Related learning experiences in the basic education

Through the basic education, students should be provided with the following learning experiences on topics related to Theme 1: Hong Kong under “One Country, Two Systems”:

Topic: The meaning and implementation of “one country, two systems”

The process of the occupation of Hong Kong by the British under its colonial administration after the Opium War to Hong Kong’s return to China; the constitutional relationship between the Central Authorities and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; the significance of the Constitution and the Basic Law to Hong Kong residents; the basis of the laws of the Hong Kong Special

(20)

Administrative Region; the significance of the rule of law; the political structure of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; the fundamental rights and duties of Hong Kong residents; national security, etc.

Topic: Situation of the country and sense of national identity

Important government organisations of the country; brief introduction to the situation of contemporary development of the country; factors that promote national identity, etc.

Topic: Characteristics of cultural diversity of the Hong Kong society

The origin and major characteristics of Chinese culture; the similarities and differences in traditional customs and habits of people of the same and different regions, cultures, ethnicities and religions in the country; the history and recent political and social development of Hong Kong over the last hundred years and the development of cultural diversity, etc.

Theme and Structure

Theme 1: Hong Kong under “One Country, Two Systems”

Topic Learning Focus

The meaning and

implementation of “one

country, two systems”

Brief introduction to the origin of the question of Hong Kong (the three unequal treaties and the background) and the process of Hong Kong’s return to China

Constitutional relationship between the country and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) (China has indisputable sovereignty and jurisdiction over Hong Kong), legal basis of “one country, two systems” and the Basic Law

Significance of safeguarding national security (i.e. a holistic approach to national security); the National Security Law and promoting long-term development of Hong Kong; and striking the balance between rule of law and human rights

Political structure of the HKSAR

(21)

Significance of rule of law: law-abidingness; judicial independence; equality before the law; fair and open trial

Fundamental rights and duties of Hong Kong residents as stipulated in the Basic Law

Situation of the country and sense of national identity

Brief introduction to the contemporary situation of the country: political structure of the country; composition of the Chinese nation; concept of Chinese nationality and Chinese citizens

The national symbols (national flag, national emblem, national anthem) and stipulations as stated in Annex III to the Basic Law

Achievements of the country in different areas in recent years (new high-end technologies, medical care and public health, culture and education, infrastructures, poverty eradication)

Benefits and contributions of the HKSAR’s participation in national affairs:

benefits: the country’s policies supporting the development of Hong Kong; enabling Hong Kong to have the advantage of “one country, two systems”

contributions: Hong Kong promoting the development of and exchange with the Mainland in different areas;

donations for natural disasters and supporting the needs of the developing regions of the Mainland

Characteristics of cultural diversity of the Hong Kong society

Factors shaping the characteristics of cultural diversity with Chinese culture as the mainstay in the Hong Kong society:

brief introduction to the development of Hong Kong, the impact of Chinese traditional culture integrating with different cultures on the Hong Kong society

Positive significance of the characteristics of cultural diversity to the Hong Kong society: promoting inclusion of cultures, facilitating cultural innovations and reflections, promoting harmony among different ethnic groups, nurturing citizenship rooted in Chinese culture with a global perspective

Supplementary explanatory notes

The following supplementary explanatory notes are intended to help teachers and students understand the “learning focuses” of the above theme and topics. There would not be further explanation provided if not deemed necessary.

(22)

Hong Kong has been part of the territory of China since ancient times; the three unequal treaties are the Treaty of Nanking (1842), the Convention of Peking (1860), and the Convention for the Extension of Hong Kong Territory (1898).

Brief introduction to Hong Kong’s return to China

The negotiations between China and the United Kingdom on the Hong Kong issue: an outline of the negotiation process; the country’s position and the rationale for the question of Hong Kong

Our country putting forward the concept of “one country, two systems”

The signing of the “Sino-British Joint Declaration”

The enactment and promulgation of the Basic Law

Our country resuming the exercise of sovereignty over Hong Kong

The establishment of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

The provisions about the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region in the Constitution and the Basic Law

The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region is an inalienable part of the People’s Republic of China. China has indisputable sovereignty and jurisdiction over Hong Kong

The People’s Republic of China establishes special administrative regions and decides the systems instituted in special administrative regions in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution

The Basic Law implements the basic policies of the country regarding Hong Kong, safeguarding the implementation of “one country, two systems” in Hong Kong

The National People’s Congress authorises the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region to exercise a high degree of autonomy in accordance with the provisions of the Basic Law

National security

Safeguarding sovereignty and territorial integrity is the cornerstone of our country’s long-term security and social stability. Other countries also have legislations on national security

An overview of the legislative background, enactment process, main content, and implementation of the National Security Law in Hong Kong

Safeguarding the security of the country and Hong Kong; ensuring the implementation of “one country, two systems”; stabilising the social order

National security does not affect the rule of law in Hong Kong and the rights of Hong Kong residents in accordance with the law; Hong Kong residents must abide by the law to safeguard national security and the rule

(23)

of law

The political structure of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

An executive-led system headed by the Chief Executive

The executive authorities, the legislature and the judiciary perform their respective functions under the executive-led system in accordance with the Basic Law and complement each other

Brief introduction to the political structure of the country

Article 1 of the Constitution states that “The socialist system is the fundamental system of the People’s Republic of China”

National People’s Congress

Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference

Composition of the Chinese nation

China is a unified multiethnic state

The requirements regarding the relations and policy of ethnic groups of the People’s Republic of China as stipulated in Article 4 of the Constitution

The provisions about Chinese nationality and Chinese citizens in the Constitution and the Nationality Law of the People’s Republic of China; the provisions about residents of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region in the Basic Law (including permanent residents and non-permanent residents)

National symbols: national flag, national emblem, national anthem

The meaning behind the design of the national flag and the national emblem;

the national sentiments embodied in the national anthem

Suggestions to promote Hong Kong residents’ understanding of and respect for the national symbols

Achievements of the country

Cultural diversity with Chinese culture as the mainstay in the Hong Kong society

Hong Kong as a Chinese society, the continuity and development of Chinese culture in Hong Kong

Hong Kong as an open and inclusive international metropolis where different ethnic groups coexist, which promotes the development of Hong Kong’s cultural diversity

(24)

2.4.2 Theme 2: Our Country since Reform and Opening-up

Introduction

The People’s Republic of China was established in 1949. In the early days of the founding of the country, the government put forward the goal of socialist construction and implemented different political, economic, and social planning and construction.

However, during the “Cultural Revolution” from 1966 to 1976, the country and people experienced severe damage and losses. When the “Cultural Revolution” was over, the country had to rebuild its society and economy. The Third Plenary Session of the Eleventh Central Committee of the Communist Party of China held at the end of 1978 confirmed the path of reform and opening-up, and the country has thereafter set itself on the road of socialist modernisation with Chinese characteristics.

During the country’s modernisation process, the people’s quality of life and overall national strength have been enhanced, and China has also been actively participating in international affairs. Under this theme, students will understand our country's process of development and its vision since the reform and opening-up, as well as its participation in international affairs in line with the policy of multifaceted diplomacy.

On the other hand, as Hong Kong is an inalienable part of the country, students will also explore the process of Hong Kong’s integration into the overall development of our country.

Related learning experiences in the basic education

Through the basic education, students should have been provided with the following learning experiences on topics related to Theme 2: Our country since Reform and Opening-up:

Topic: Change in people’s life and overall national strength

Major historical development and important historical events of our country and the world over the last century; national economic and environmental issues, etc.

Topic: The development of our country and the integration of Hong Kong into the overall national development

The domestic affairs of the People’s Republic of China; the relationship between the

(25)

Central Authorities and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; the impact of the country’s reform and opening up on Hong Kong, etc.

Topic: Participation in international affairs

The formation of the international political situation in the 20th century; brief introduction to the foreign relations of the People’s Republic of China; contact between the East and the West in promoting world peace and international cooperation, etc.

Theme and Structure

Theme 2: Our Country since Reform and Opening-up

Topic Learning Focus

Change in people’s life and overall national strength

Brief introduction to the development of China’s reform and opening-up (key stages) and related strategies

Changes and enhancement of people’s quality of life (income, mode of consumption, educational level, standard of medical care, life expectancy, poverty eradication, etc.)

Enhancement of overall national strength (economy, culture, natural resources, education, technology, national defence, etc.)

The

development of our country and the integration of Hong Kong into the overall national

development

The focuses and policies of the recent Five-Year Plans of our country, and the connection of these focuses and policies with the promotion of the development of our country and Hong Kong

The development plans and policies related to Hong Kong (the development of the Greater Bay Area, The Mainland and Hong Kong Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA)) and the relationship with the promotion of the development of Hong Kong

(26)

Participation in international affairs

The notion of multifaceted diplomacy since the 21st century

Actions and initiatives: rescues of various nature and assistance to other countries; setting up international organisations and organising international forums; the Belt and Road Initiative

Impact of participation in international affairs on the country’s overall development, and the active role played by Hong Kong

Supplementary explanatory notes

The following supplementary explanatory notes are intended to help teachers and students understand the “learning focuses” of the above theme and topics. There would not be further explanation provided if not deemed necessary.

Reform and opening-up

Origin: background and beginning of reform and opening up; the

“three-step development strategy” (meeting the most basic needs of the people → moderate prosperity → prosperity) and the adjustments made;

the relationship between the “three-step development strategy” and the realisation of the goal of national modernisation

Examples of strategies: changing the mindset and acting with pragmatism, making adjustments to the development strategy to prioritise economic development; letting some people get rich first, and finally achieving common prosperity; promoting development in coastal areas and establishing Special Economic Zones first; establishing a socialist market economy

The recent Five-Year Plans

The relationship between the overall focus and the promotion of the development of the country, such as aligning with the country’s overall development vision, meeting the country’s development needs, and enhancing the country’s competitiveness in different aspects

Items included in the document that support the development of Hong Kong;

the importance of the items in promoting the development of Hong Kong;

and the relevant supporting measures taken by Hong Kong

The development of the Greater Bay Area

(27)

The cities involved and their respective development positioning; important infrastructure constructions in the region; development opportunities of Hong Kong

The Mainland and Hong Kong Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA)

Scope of coverage; benefits to the Mainland and Hong Kong

The notion of multifaceted diplomacy

Diplomacy is not one-way, but requires mutual exchanges, balanced and full participation in international affairs

Through different diplomatic aspects (such as energy, culture, medical care, trading), implement the notion of multifaceted diplomacy, realise national development goals, and strengthen cooperative relations with other countries

Participation in actions and initiatives

Overseas humanitarian rescue after natural disasters (such as earthquakes);

offering foreign aid; operations to maintain regional peace (such as participation in the United Nations peacekeeping forces)

Setting up and organising international organisations (such as Shanghai Cooperation Organisation); organising international forums (such as Boao Forum for Asia)

The “Belt and Road Initiative”: a brief background, routes, and the focus of cooperation (“Five Links”)

Impact of participation in international affairs on the country’s overall development

Strengthen relations with other countries; safeguard an environment conducive to the development of the country; promote economic, trade and cultural exchanges

Increase international status and influence

The active role played by Hong Kong

As a special administrative region of our country and an international city, Hong Kong is an important bridge between the Mainland and the international market, and helps the country in extending its international connections

(28)

2.4.3 Theme 3: Interconnectedness and Interdependence of the Contemporary World

Introduction

In the 21st century, due to the rapid development of transportation and information technology, real and virtual cross-border activities have become more frequent, and relations between countries have become closer.

In this theme, students will learn about the situation of the contemporary world from four topics. In the economy aspect, global economic activities have gradually crossed national borders, reflecting the trend of economic globalisation. In the technology aspect, the development of new technology is changing with each passing day, and information technology can connect people in an instant, making it necessary to cultivate students’ information literacy. In the aspect of sustainable development, the concept emphasises the balance of the three dimensions of environment, society and economy to ensure that present and future generations can enjoy a quality life. In the aspect of public health, while the World Health Organization plays an important role in handling global public health affairs, our country and Hong Kong also make considerable contributions. Individuals are also responsible for maintaining good public health.

Related learning experiences in the basic education

Through the basic education, students should have been provided with the following learning experiences on topics related to Theme 3: Interconnectedness and Interdependence of the Contemporary World:

Topic: Economic globalisation

The characteristics of economic globalisation; the mutual influence of the economic systems of various countries, etc.

Topic: Technological development and information literacy

Making good use of technology to enhance connections; understand the development of innovative technology and its impact on daily life; media and information literacy, etc.

Topic: Sustainable development

(29)

The importance of promoting sustainable development; cooperation among countries of different development levels; strategies and actions of regional organisations and international non-governmental organisations promoting environmental protection and sustainable development since the 20th century, etc.

Topic: Public health and human health

Main factors affecting personal health and means to stay healthy; the impact of personal hygiene and lifestyle on personal health and public health; the work of some international organisations, etc.

Theme and Structure

Theme 3: Interconnectedness and Interdependence of the Contemporary World

Topic Learning Focus

Economic globalisation

Interdependence of economies of all countries and cooperation of international economic organisations; development of multinational corporations, global labour and financial market integration; development of new economies and the impact on individuals (consumption and employment) and the development of Hong Kong and our country

Technological development and

information literacy

Brief introduction to the latest technological development around the world: artificial intelligence, big data, cloud storage of data

Development features of information technology: the Internet, social networking sites, instant messaging software

Relationship between information literacy and positive values;

identifying false information; morals and conduct in using technologies; observing the relevant laws

Sustainable development

The rationale of sustainable development and the practical experiences of environmental conservation of our country, Hong Kong and other regions

The roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders in

(30)

promoting environmental conservation

Public health and human health

Functions and roles of the World Health Organization in global public health matters

Contributions of our country and Hong Kong to global public health (particularly in preventing and controlling infectious diseases)

Individuals’ responsibilities in promoting public health (particularly in responding to infectious diseases)

Supplementary explanatory notes

The following supplementary explanatory notes are intended to help teachers and students understand the “learning focuses” of the above theme and topics. There would not be further explanation provided if not deemed necessary.

Economic globalisation

The meaning of economic globalisation in brief

International economic organisations (such as the World Trade Organization, World Bank) coordinating international trade and promoting international cooperation

The development of multinational corporations overseas and its impact

The mobility of the global labour market and the international division of labour; the opening and integration of the global financial market

The meaning of new economies: from manufacturing-based economies to technology-based economies

The impact of artificial intelligence, big data, cloud storage of data on people’s daily life

The characteristics of the development of information technology

Characteristics such as informatisation, digitalisation, and smartisation

Wide circulation of a large amount of information in a short period of time, accompanied with constant updating and forwarding

Real-time communication, sharing of information and concerted action among people in different geographical locations

Proliferation of false information, which users need to discern carefully

(31)

Information literacy

Referring to the government (including the Education Bureau) website for information on information literacy

Understanding the concept of sustainable development as interpreted by the United Nations

Practical experience in environmental conservation, such as

Low-carbon transportation system

Sustainable waste management

Protection of biodiversity

Responsible consumption and production

The roles and responsibilities of government, education sector, business sector, non-governmental organisations, and individuals in promoting environmental conservation

The meaning of public health in brief

Contributions of our country to global public health

Prevention and control of infectious diseases: effectively preventing and controlling epidemics domestically and slowing down the spread of the virus; launching work on the research and development of vaccines;

assisting countries/regions with insufficient epidemic prevention facilities to fight the epidemic

Other: establishing foreign aid medical teams to support the medical and health services in developing countries; supporting and cooperating with the World Health Organization to promote the development of global public health

Contributions of Hong Kong to global public health

Pathogen identification technology, monitoring and diagnosis of emerging infectious diseases (such as SARS)

The relationship between the individuals and public health

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle and promoting physical and mental health

When an epidemic breaks out and spreads, fulfilling civic responsibilities and cooperating with the government’s policy to fight the epidemic together

(32)

2.5 Mainland Study Tour

The Mainland study tour, with its related project learning, includes learning elements of Chinese culture and the latest development and achievements of our country. It forms part of the curriculum of Citizenship and Social Development but does not involve any public assessment. The Mainland study tour contributes to the curriculum aims through experiential learning by:

(a) providing an opportunity for students to learn to become self-directed learners responsible for their own learning;

(b) enhancing students’ ability to connect, integrate and apply what they have learnt from the three themes;

(c) helping students develop generic skills, including critical thinking, communication and self-learning skills, through field study and project learning; and

(d) broadening students’ horizons, enhancing their understanding of our country and cultivating a sense of national identity.

2.5.1 Expected learning outcomes

The learning experiences in the Mainland study tour will help students:

(a) enhance their learning effectiveness through studying the themes of Citizenship and Social Development;

(b) enhance their understanding of the achievements of our country to cultivate a sense of national identity and to broaden their perspectives through studying various curriculum-related areas;

(c) present their learning and self-reflection based on facts and evidence, with an objective, fair and empathetic attitude;

(d) become responsible and committed citizens through understanding, appreciating and inheriting Chinese culture; and

(e) gain first-hand understanding of the various aspects of the development of our country, and the interactive relationship between our country and Hong Kong, in order to understand the opportunities and challenges facing the development of our country and Hong Kong, enabling them to conduct life planning and think about how to contribute to our country and Hong Kong.

(33)

2.5.2 Framework

Chinese culture has a long history with continuity across centuries. It is a treasure of human civilisation. The meaning of Chinese culture can be approached from three dimensions, the material dimension (e.g. architecture, historical sites), the institutional dimension (e.g. folk customs, rituals) and the spiritual dimension (e.g. philosophy, ethics and morality). The three dimensions are interrelated, demonstrating the richness and multifacetedness of Chinese culture. During the modernisation of our country, traditional Chinese culture has naturally evolved. While some cultural practices remain a vital part of the daily life of various ethnic groups in China, some are inherited through different means of conservation.

To accurately understand the meaning of Chinese culture, there is no better way than personal experience. The Mainland study tour of Citizenship and Social Development is linked to the theme of Chinese Culture and Modern Life. It provides Mainland study opportunities for students to experience local customs and ways of life, appreciate precious historical sites and relics, as well as explore the development and changes of Chinese culture in modern society from multiple perspectives. After the tour, students will conduct project learning to demonstrate their learning outcomes.

The table below shows the framework for the theme of the Mainland study tour.

Theme: Chinese Culture and Modern Life

Topic Learning Focus

Nature of traditional Chinese culture

Online self-learning of articles introducing the special characteristics of traditional Chinese culture

Conservation and inheritance of cultural heritage (including tangible and intangible cultural heritage), including applying technology in conservation works

Introduction to the Mainland study tour

Study tour to the Mainland to experience the conservation and inheritance of Chinese culture in society

Detailed planning and reading information before the study tour

Methods of on-site collection of information

Study tour report drafting requirements

(34)

2.5.3 Arrangement of Mainland study tour

The EDB will not prescribe standardised requirements for the Mainland study tour.

Based on the school-based situations, schools can decide the details of the study tours, including the number of study tours, number of days, itinerary and routes, and the form(s) involved at the senior secondary level. Schools can appropriately arrange students to join those EDB Mainland study tours that are aligned with the Citizenship and Social Development curriculum.1 The EDB will provide subsidies for students and teachers participating in the Mainland study tours. Schools can also make use of the Life-wide Learning Grant, the Senior Secondary School Students Exchange Programme Subvention Scheme, the Grant for the Sister School Scheme or integrate other appropriate resources2 to organise Mainland study tours for students, or participate in Mainland study tours organised by external organisations.3 However, the premise is that the itinerary should be in line with the curriculum rationale and aims of Citizenship and Social Development.

In accordance with the requirements of the framework of the theme, the itinerary of the Mainland study tour should include site visits or study topics with elements of Chinese culture, such as experiencing the inheritance and development of traditional Chinese culture in modern society, understanding the conservation and revitalisation of cultural heritage, visiting exhibits of Chinese culture in museums, and visiting historical and cultural sites (historical sites, religious or sacrificial buildings, former residences of cultural figures, etc.). Site visits or study topics other than Chinese culture but are relevant to the curriculum content of Citizenship and Social Development, such as the latest national development and the results of innovative technological applications in contemporary times, can also be included to enrich the itinerary, helping students understand the situation of our country from multiple perspectives and broaden their horizons.

The Mainland study tour, with its related project learning, is an integral part of the curriculum of Citizenship and Social Development. It should not be perceived by

______________________

1 After the implementation of Citizenship and Social Development in the 2021/22 school year, the EDB will continue to organise Mainland study tours that are in line with the curriculum. Details and updates will be provided for schools for reference in due course.

2 Schools should make reference to the EDB circulars and guidelines, ensuring the use of subsidies is in line with the principles and ambit. Schools should also maintain proper records of different subsidies distributed to the students.

3 Schools should follow the tendering and procurement procedures in accordance with the related circulars/guidelines applicable to the school types when commissioning an external organisation to organise the school-based Mainland study tours or exchange programmes.

Figure

Updating...

References

Related subjects :