Second and Final Report of the Planning Committee for the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

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Second and Final Report of the Planning Committee

For

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

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CONTENTS

SUMMARY

PART A - GENERAL INTRODUCTION Background

Transition from Planning Committee to University Council Committee Structure of the Council

First Appointments to the Council of the University First Report of the Planning Committee

PART B - ADVICE OFFERED BY THE PLANNING COMMITTEE TO THE HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

Background

Management Structure Officers of the University Interim Management Structure

PART C - PROGRESS ON EXECUTIVE TASKS Selection of Site

Architectural Competition for Design of Campus Selection of Master Plan to be Implemented Acquisition of the Site at Clear Water Bay Access to the Site at Clear Water Bay Area Requirements for the Campus Production of a Video Film

Design of an Emblem

Issue of a Set of Stamps to Mark the Establishment of the University PART D - PROGRESS MADE WTTH ISSUES THAT ARE ONGOING Introduction

Academic Planning and Development Sub-Committee Advice from the Vice-Chancellor

Refinement of Academic Profile The Initial Courses of Study School of Engineering

School of Science

School of Business and Management General Education Centre

Planned Growth of the Student Population Academic Staffing Requirements

Collaboration with Industry and Commerce Future Role of the Sub-Committee

Pace

5 12 12 12 15 16 16 18 19 20 21 21 22 22 23 23 23 23 24 24 24 25 25 25 26 26 -l-

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PaPe Campus Planning and Estate Management Sub-Committee

Background

Programme for the Stage II Assessment

Public Exhibition of Architectural Submissions Current Issues

Establishment Sub-Committee

Staff Salary Scales and Conditions of Service Finance Sub-Committee

Background

Recurrent Expenditure for 1988-89 to 1990-91 Setting-Up Grant for 1988-91

Senior Staff Recruitment Sub-Committee Recruitment of Key Staff in 1988-89 Placement of Recruitment Advertisements Campus Project Management Sub-Committee

Project Executive Team Design Review Committee Project Management Team Project Brief

Appointment of Consultants

Capital Budget for the Campus Building Project

PART E - ACKNOWLEI?GEMENTS AND CONCLUDING REMARKS

27 27 28 28 28 29 29 31 31 32 32 32 32 32 33 33 34

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ApDendix A B(l)-(10) C D E F G H I J Is L M N 0 P

Q

R DescriPtion

Terms of Reference of the Planning Committee

Membership of Planning Committee and Sub-Committees

Transition from Planning Committee Sub-Committee Structure to Council Committee Structure

Management Structure Chart for The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 1996-97

Interim Management Structure Chart for The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 1992-93

Colour Photographs of the Model of the Design Submitted by Design Consultants & Lotus in Association with Wong & Ouyang (HK) Ltd.

Colour Photographs of the Model of the Design Submitted by Simon Kwan & Associates in Association with Percy Thomas Partnership (HK)

Artist’s Impression of the Main Approach to the Campus

Letter from Chairman, UPGC, Regarding Area Requirements for the Campus

Academic Profile - Preliminary Model

School of Business and Management - Preliminary Statement of Educational Philosophy

Projected Student Population

Projected Undergraduate Student Population --- School of Engineering

Projected Undergraduate Student Population --- School of Science Projected Undergraduate Student Population --- School of Business

and Management

Projected Postgraduate Student Population

Projected Academic Posts Required 1989/90 - 1995/96 Revised Campus Building Project Cost Estimate

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SUMMARY OF CONTENTS

This Second Report is the Final Report of the Planning Committee for The Hong

Kong University of Science andTechnology. It covers the period 1 October 1987 to 9Aprill988

and deals with the events subsequent to the issue of the First Report and prior to the transfer of planning and executive responsibility for the University to its new Council.

Part A of the Report is concerned with the transition from Planning Committee to University Council and contains advice on how the University Council should organise itself to undertake a planning and executive role. It also summarises the contents of the Planning Committee’s First Report covering the first year of its work to September 1987.

In Part B of the Report, the Planning Committee tenders advice on the adminis- trative framework for the proper function and regulation of the University, completing its task of providing advice to the Hong Kong Government on all aspects of its terms of reference.

Part C of the Report describes the progress made on a number of executive tasks and includes the architectural competiton for the design of the campus, the selection of the master plan to be implemented, the acquisition of the site at Clear Water Bay, access to the site at Clear Water Bay, area requirements for the campus, production of a video film, design of an emblem, and the issue of a set of special stamps to mark the establishment of the University.

Part D of the Report describes the progress made by each sub-committee of the Planning Committee since the issue of the First Report. It describes the work of the Academic Planning and Development Sub-Committee in its refinement of the academic profile, its selection of the initial courses of study in each of the Schools and the General Education Centre, the introduction of Biology as a first year subject in the School of Science and the resultant amendments to the planned growth in the student population and academic staffing require- ments, its proposals for collaboration with industry and commerce, and finally its perception of its future role. Reference is made to the Campus Planning and Estate Management Sub- Committee and its concern with the final stages of the Architectural Competition involving the programme for the Stage II assessment and the public exhibition of the architectural submissions. It refers to the production by the Establishment Sub-Committee of a preliminary set of salary scales and conditions of service, prepared on the principle that, taken as a package, the salaries and other conditions of service for the new University should be comparable to those offered by the other universities in Hong Kong, and records the sub-committee’s views that a medical and dental insurance scheme should be established.

With the incorporation of the University as an independent statutory body on 10 April 1988, Part D refers to the necessity for the Finance Sub-Committee to consider the funding required in the period 1988/89 to 1990/91, to enable the University to meet its operational expenses. It also refers to the intention of the Senior Staff Recruitment Sub- Committee to recruit Deans for each of the three Schools and the General Education Centre to assist the Vice-Chancellor in preparing the University for admitting the first batch of students in 1991. The immediate tasks for these Deans include the drawing up of academic plans and course structures and the determination of staffing requirements and other related matters. It further explains the need for a Director of Computing Services, to be responsible for determining the data processing requirements for the University and for advising on the design and acquisition of the University’s computer telecommunications network and other support

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facilities. It describes the work of the Campus Project Management Sub-Committee and its formation of a Project Executive Team, a Design Review Committee and a Project Manage- ment Team. Reference is also made to the development of the Project Brief, the appointment of the consultants and the capital budget for the campus building project.

In conclusion, Part E of the Report acknowledges the advice, support and co- operation proffered by a number of bodies and organisations which allowed the Planning Committee to complete its various tasks in a project which aims not only at helping to meet the demand of the community and the aspirations of Hong Kong’s young people in the field of tertiary education but also at enriching the quality of life in Hong Kong.

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PART A

GENERAL INTRODUCTION Background

The Planning Committee for The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology was formed by the Government in September 1986 and in November 1987 published its First Report, covering the first year of the Planning Committee’s work to September 1987. This Second Report is the Final Report of the Planning Committee and it deals with the events subsequent to the issue of the First Report and prior to the transfer of planning and executive responsibility for the University to its new Council. Certain paragraphs of the Report are of an advisory nature which, it is hoped, will assist the Council of the new University in its future deliberations.

2. The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Ordinance 1987 was enacted by the Legislative Council on 1 July 1987 and will be brought into effect on 10 April 1988. The first appointments to membership of the Council of the new University will also be effective from that date. This Report, therefore, covers the period 1 October 1987 to 9 April 1988.

TRANSITION FROM PLANNING COMMITTEE TO UNIVERSITY COUNCIL Committee Structure of the Council

3. The terms of reference of the Planning Committee remain unchanged and these ---- are reproduced at Appendix A. Details of the Planning Committee and Sub-Committee ---- membership are provided in Appendix B.

4. The Planning Committee recognises that it is for the Council of the University, when appointed, to decide how it should organise itself to undertake a planning and executive role. However, in considering this matter, the Planning Committee, based on its own experience and in the interest of a smooth transition, sees merit in making recommendations for a committee structure for consideration by the Council.

5. Consideration was given initially to devising a committee structure for the Council that would evolve gradually and be integrated with the committee structure for the University, but the Planning Committee believed that the views of the senior academic and administrative staff, to be appointed to the University, should be obtained first. At this stage, therefore, the Planning Committee has considered only the formation of Committees of the Council during the initial period of its operation.

6. The Planning Committee accepts that when the University is operative the Council and Committees of the Council should be concerned mainly with policy matters. It is inevitable, during the planning stage, however, that the Council and its Committees will also be involved in executive decision making.

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7. The following advice is offered on how the existing committees and sub- -_--- committees of the Planning Committee (Appendix C) should be adapted to form Committees

of the Council: -

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The Academic Planning and Development Sub-Committee should become the Academic Planning and Development Committee. This Committee is seen as transitional and will cease to exist as the Senate is able to take over its work.

W

The Finance Sub-Committee should become the Finance Committee and will be involved only in policy issues.

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The Campus Planning and Estate Management Sub-Committee should become the Campus Planning and Estate Management Committee but should dispense with its estate management function when the day-to-day estate management is taken over by the University.

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The Campus Project Management Sub-Committee which, in accordance with the Executive Council’s agreement on 2 June 1987, has full and sole responsibility through the Planning Committee for the implementation of the Campus project, should become the Campus Project Management Committee. This Committee will be dissolved when the campus project is completed.

e)

The Establishment Sub-Committee should become the Conditions of Service Committee.

f) The Senior Staff Recruitment Sub-Committee should become the Appointments Committee but this too should be dissolved eventually. If necessary, ad-hoc Recruitment Committees could then be set up for specific tasks. The Vice- Chancellor and his senior staff will be responsible for recruitment, provided this conforms to recruitment policy and budgetary guidelines.

!a

A Standing Committee of the Council, to parallel the existing Executive Committee of the Planning Committee, is considered necessary, particularly in the early years of the Council. Initially, it would be involved in both executive decision taking and policy making but most of its executive role would gradually be delegated to the Vice-Chancellor when he and the senior staff are in post. Although many of the non-major policy issues will also eventually be delegated to the Vice- Chancellor, the Standing Committee will retain a general policy function. The role of the Standing Committee is envisaged as formulating Council policy, excluding that covered by other Committees of the Council; co-ordinating the work of various Council Committees; managing Council business between plenary sessions of the Council; and, exercising an executive function. Membership of the Standing Committee should include the Chairman and Vice-Chairman of the Council, the Chairmen of the Committees of the Council, the Vice-Chancellor and possibly a few other members of the Council.

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The role of the General Matters Sub-Committee will be absorbed by the Standing Committee of the Council.

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--- The proposed committee structure of the Council is also shown in Appendix C. First ADDointments to the Council of the Universitv

8. In its First Report the Planning Committee noted that it would be for the Chancellor to make the first appointments to the Council and for the Council, when formed, to recommend to the Chancellor the appointment of the remaining members, under Section 9( l)(g)(ii) and (iii) of The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Ordinance? The Governor also appoints three public officers under Section 9(l)(e)(*).

9. Section 9( l)(g)(i)S of the Ordinance allows for the appointment of not more than five members from other tertiary institutions in or outside Hong Kong and for this reason it is not possible for all of the academic members on the Planning Committee to be appointed to the Council. It is hoped, however, that those not appointed will continue to serve on Committees of the Council.

FIRST REPORT OF THE PLANNING COMMITTEE

10. The First Report of the Planning Committee covered the first year of the Committee’s work and was produced in four parts.

11. Part A dealt with the appointment of the Planning Committee in September 1986 by the Governor of Hong Kong, the membership and terms of reference of the Committee, and the modus operandi adopted by the Committee. Part A described also the Committee’s wish to have the new University in operation in 1991, much earlier than the 1994-97 deadline indicated in its terms of reference, in recognition of the needs of the Hong Kong community as well as in fulfilment of the wishes of the late Governor of Hong Kong, Sir Edward Youde. In accordance with the Planning Committee’s terms of reference, the emphasis of the new University was placed on science, technology and management and business studies with a student population of 7,000 full time and equivalent part-time students (FTEs) by 1999-2000, and room for further development up to about 10,000.

Notes

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the recommendation of the Council

(4 V)(e) not more than 3 members, who shall be public officers, appointed by the Governor.

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w k) (9 not more than 10 shall have experience in commerce or industry in Hong Kong and not more

than 5 shall be from other tertiary institutions in or outside Hong Kong.

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12. Part B of the Report dealt with advice conveyed already to the Hong Kong Government and Government’s response to that advice. The first set of recommendations forwarded on 8 January 1987 were in respect of the choice of a name for the new University, following an invitation to the public to make suggestions; the selection of a site for the University campus from four potential sites; and, the Committee’s advice on the level of entry for first degree courses at the University. On 17 January 1987, the Hong Kong Government notified the Committee of its acceptance of the Committee’s advice that the University should be named “The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology” in English and

ll ??$@*+#?$A@ ” in Chinese, that the University should be located at the former Kohima Barracks site at Clear Water Bay, with additional adjacent land earmarked for University use. The University should plan for three-year first degree courses with entry at “A” level. However, should the Government decide to approve and fund the University of Hong Kong Proposal for four-year first degree courses after six years of secondary education, the University will change similarly in the interests of uniformity of entry levels. A further recommendation was conveyed to the Hong Kong Administration in respect of student hostel accommodation, which the Committee believed should be provided, for avariety of compelling reasons, from public funds to enable students to spend a significant part of their university life in residence on campus. In its reply the Administration stated that privately funded and operated hostels to a level of 30% could be provided and that only if sufficient private funds could not be obtained could the use of public funds be considered. Part B of the First Report described also the enactment, by the Hong Kong Legislative Council on 1 July 1987, of The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Ordinance and the acceptance by the Hong Kong Government on 2 June 1987, on the advice of the Planning Committee, of a donation of HK$1,500 million by The Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club to fund the greater part of the cost of construction of the University campus and the arrangements made for the Jockey Club, which has immense experience in large construction projects, to manage the project on behalf of the Planning Committee.

13. Part C of the First Report described the progress made by the Planning Committee with certain issues which were ongoing and which the Committee would address in the next phase of its work. These were: -

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b)

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f)

refinement of the preliminary academic profile, to ensure that the courses to be offered matched the economic demand for graduates;

the structure of the courses to be offered, a modular system being favoured;

the medium of instruction, with a strong emphasis on English and Chinese, and with consideration being given to third languages, such as Japanese, being proposed;

the student mix emphasising a strong effort in the field of postgraduate programmes, both full-time and part-time;

the planned growth of the student population, with the academic and administrative staff and the facilities necessary to support this growth; the indicative recurrent and capital costs; and,

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the staff salary scales and conditions of service.

14. Part D of the First Report was concerned with the progress made towards the selection of the University’s first Vice-Chancellor and the architectural competition for the procurement of the campus master plan. It described how, following a very comprehensive recruitment exercise carried out by the Vice-Chancellor Search Sub-Committee, the Planning Committee, at its meeting on 21 September 1987, accepted the advice of the Search Sub- Committee that a recommendation should be made to the Hong Kong Government that Professor Chia-Wei WOO, who is the President of the San Francisco State University in the USA, should be offered appointment as the founding Vice-Chancellor of The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. This recommendation was approved subsequently by the Governor on 10 October 1987 and a formal announcement of Professor Woo’s appointment was made on 5 November 1987.

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PART B

ADVICE OFFERED BY THE PLANNING COMMITTEE TO THE HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

Background

15. The Planning Committee’s First Report provided details of the advice tendered to Government on all aspects of its terms of reference apart from the requirement to advise on the administrative framework for the proper function and regulation of the University. Management Structure

16. In drafting The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Ordinance, the Planning Committee structured thegovernance of theuniversity tomeetpresent day demands. In formalising the structure, the aim was to create a coherent and open structure of governance and management based upon the devolutionof decision takingwithin anintegrated framework. The principle of integration was regarded as essential to the maintenance of the University as a corporate entity even though in reality the organisational structure will inevitably be divided into committee and responsible officer sub-structures. In this respect, it will be necessary for the Council of the University, when the views of senior academic and administrative staff are obtained, to rationalise the committee structure to ensure that it is complementary to and integrated with the management structure. In considering governance and administration, the Planning Committee also took note of the report of the Steering Committee for Efficiency Studies in Universities (also known as the Jarratt Report) because it is the most recent, comprehensive, and critical study of university administration in the United Kingdom and provides a good reference for cost effective and efficient management without undue interference with academic freedom.

17. The management structure chart for The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, presented at Appendix D, reflects the views of the Planning Committee described above. It was drafted in consultation with the Vice-Chancellor (Designate) and refers to the anticipated steady state of the University around 1996/97. (An interim management structure for the early days of the University is described in paras. 28 to 30 below). The Committee --_-- believes that the structure set out in Appendix D provides, on a cost effective and efficient basis,

academic and administrative support for the Vice-Chancellor, whilst at the same time enabling him to function effectively as the Chief Executive and Academic Officer of the University. Officers of the Universitv

18. Having considered the general principles to be adopted in the management and administration of the University, the Committee went on to consider the roles of the principal officers of the University. In the course of preparing the management structure chart at Appendix D, the views of the Vice-Chancellor (Designate) have been taken into full account. The Vice-Chancellor will be the Chief Executive and Academic Officer as well as the main representative and spokesman for the University, he will chair the Senate, and he will be responsible to the Council for the administration of the University. He will also be personally involved in those activities and critical decisions which affect the future shape and performance

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of the University, such as planning, overall academic direction, the appointment and promotion of senior members of the University, research and development involving external activities, and the recurrent and capital development programme.

19. The management structure chart in Appendix D proposes that immediate support will be provided to the Vice-Chancellor by the Pro-Vice-Chancellors for Academic Affairs, Research and Development, and Administration and Business, and by the University Secretary. The intention is that the Vice-Chancellor’s “cabinet”, consisting of these five persons, should meet at frequent intervals to ensure that no important decisions affecting the University are taken in isolation.

20. The Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Academic Affairs, in addition to being responsible in management terms for the Deans and their Schools, will also be concerned with the areas of academic management which cut across the responsibilities of the Deans, such as admissions policy, educational technology, the library, computing services and the language centre. 21. The Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Research and Development, will be responsible for research strategy within the University and for establishing strong links with industry and commerce and other similar organisations as well as for creating a favourable climate for a mutually beneficial research and development environment in Hong Kong. The structure of the office of Research and Development will evolve as the University develops and the academics take up their posts.

22. Appendix D indicates the responsibility of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Administration and Business, listing in general terms the main offices and illustrating the functions of the Administration. In practice, in addition to his role as a member of the leadership team of the University, the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Administration and Business, will be responsible for the effective and efficient administration of the University on a day to day basis.

23. The modes of operation of the office of Administration and Business will vary according to the nature of the task and the degree of responsibility for that task. In the main, this office will be a service unit implementing tasks, set for it by the University, effectively and economically, but it will also on occasions operate as a business, act as a consultant, or, even as a banker, in addition to being a “civil service”. Inevitably, its structure will evolve as the University develops.

24. Although not shown in the management structure chart, the role of School offices is regarded by the Planning Committee as of critical importance. It is envisaged that, once allocated resources by the office of Administration and Business, they will be responsible for all facets of administration (academic, financial, social, physical) as microcosms of the office of Administration and Business and not merely as offices dealing with the academic activity unique to the School. However, to encourage a concept of unity, an interrelationship of officers involved in management is envisaged and it is proposed that these officers will form a management team to meet at regular intervals to discuss the immediate issues and problems facing the various sections of the office of Administration and Business.

25. The University Secretary will play an important role in providing support to the Vice-Chancellor and his cabinet, and because of his close relationship with that team and his

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coordinating role within the University, he will be responsible for co-ordinating the revision of any plans, assessing the priority in the provision of services, both in terms of staff and resources. He will also be responsible for providing committee and secretarial services to the Council, Court, Senate and Convocation, and for looking after the public relations aspects and liaising externally with organisations like the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee.

26. The Planning Committee has always envisaged that each of the three Schools, and the General Education Centre, should be headed by a Dean. This is reflected in the Ordinance where provision is made for the Deans of the Schools or Faculties to be ex-oflcio members of the Council. The academic departments in the Schools will be key units in the University and arrangements for their efficient management will play an important role in the effectiveness of the whole institution. The Jarratt Report suggests that a management system should be devised which clarifies the authority to which heads of departments should be responsible and accountable, particularly as heads of departments are frequently responsible for the administration of large sums of money, for seeing that teaching is effective, for the use of expensive equipment and for a considerable burden of personnel management. The Deans will be the authority to which heads of departments are accountable, and they will be the principal negotiators for the School’s share of the University’s resources and the chief mediators in any internal plans. They will implement decisions about the future character and shape of the School within agreed University policy and have considerable influence upon the allocation of duties to academic staff and then career progression. They will also chair the School Boards.

27. The Planning Committee has given careful consideration to the method of appointment of the Pro-Vice-Chancellors and Deans of the University. Although in most universities Pro-Vice-Chancellor posts are not regarded as career posts, and are filled on a short term basis by senior professors who are paid an allowance in addition to their professorial salaries and are given a reduced teaching load, the Committee believes that planning of a new university should be from the top down and that, given the role assigned to them as line managers and financial controllers, the Pro-Vice-Chancellor posts at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology should be regarded as career posts like that of the Vice- Chancellor; appointments, therefore, to these posts should be made on a more permanent basis. They will be expected to serve for relatively long terms of office by contract. Similarly in the case of the Deans, the role assigned to them involves a great deal of planning on the establishment of academic departments and a substantial degree of delegated authority as line managers. It was the view of the Committee, as stated in its First Report, that the Deans should hold office by appointment rather than by election as is the case in some universities. This view is endorsed following discussion with the Vice-Chancellor (Designate). As key staff at Dean level are to be recruited first to provide the leadership, knowledge and experience necessary for the successful establishment of Schools, there is no alternative to the appointment of Deans in the absence of other academic staff to elect them. The Planning Committee and the Vice- Chancellor (Designate) nevertheless believe that an appointed Dean will have a greater sense of responsibility because he will still be in office when the consequences of his actions materialise and thus accountability will be heightened.

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Interim Management Structure

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s-s__

28. Appendix D proposes a management structure for the University around 1996/97, when the University will be in a steady state, but it will take time to build up this structure. The Planning Committee recognises that in the early days of the University different circumstances will apply and an interim management structure will be warranted. It is envisaged that a management structure for The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 1992/93, the second year of operation, should take the form shown at Appendix E. In this structure, the span of control of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Administration and Business, and the University Secretary remain unchanged but the responsibilities of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Research and Development, and the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Academic Affairs, will be different.

29. Although the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Research and Development, is likely to have a major task in fostering relations with industry and commerce, the Planning Committee believes that until research staff and students are available, his work cannot be particularly demanding and there will be scope in the first few years of the University’s existence for him to help manage the academic services. The responsibility of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Academic Affairs, will, in the early days, relate solely to the development of the Schools. 30. In tendering advice on the administrative framework for the proper function and regulation of the University, the Planning Committee has provided advice to the Hong Kong Government on all aspects of its terms of reference.

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PART C

PROGRESS ON EXECUTIVE TASKS

Selection of Site

31. As reported earlier, the Hong Kong Government has agreed that the University should be located at the former Kohima Barracks site at Clear Water Bay, with additional adjacent land earmarked for University use.

Architectural Competition for Design of Camnus

32. The First Report of the Planning Committee reported that the Stage II Requirements and Planning Brief for the Architectural Competition was issued to the six architectural teams that had been shortlisted from Stage I of the competition. Those teams, some of which were required to enhance their resources for the purpose of Stage II, were named, in alphabetical order, as: -

a) Derek Walker Associates and Hackett & Griffiths Co. Ltd.

b) Design Consultants & Lotus in association with Wong & Ouyang Ltd. c) Ie & Associates/Scottish Consultants International Ltd./

Spence Robinson Ltd.

d) Planning Services International (HK) Ltd. in association with Rocco Design Partners

e) Simon Kwan & Associates in association with Percy Thomas Partnership (HK)

f) Tsang + Wee Architects, Chan, Chan & Associates, Architects and Designers

33. Each of the six finalists was required to submit: -

a)

b)

C>

d)

nine large mounted display drawings comprising plans, sections, elevations and perspectives of prescribed parts of the campus and to prescribed scales;

one design report illustrated with reductions of the display drawings and with up to 4,000 words of text on a prescribed set of topics, sufficient to describe the principal features of the competitor’s design proposal; one scale model showing the entire master plan proposal and an optional second model to illustrate in detail a selected part of the campus; and, one declaration of authorship and one programme proposal showing how

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34. All six finalists submitted their design report, display drawings, declaration of authorship and programme proposal on the due date of 21 October, and their models on the submission date of 12 November 1987.

35. All submissions were required to be made without distinguishing marks, and the anonymity of all submissions was preserved until the declarations of authorship were opened at the conclusion of the first day of the final assessment period.

36. The submissions were scrutinised initially by a team of Technical Advisers representing eight specialist areas, and in early November, in order to assist with their preliminary assessment, a comprehensive and detailed Technical Advisers’ Report was issued with the six design reports to members of the Assessment Panel. Included in the Technical Advisers’ Report were comparative area and cost analyses of the submissions. Comparative advice offered in the Technical Advisers’ Report was expressed sparingly, and related only to individual specialisms. No attempt was made to indicate overall judgments, a task which had been reserved for the Assessment Panel under the rules of the competition.

37. The Assessment Panel comprised the same membership as for Stage I of the competition, namely: -

Chairman Dr. CHAN Nai-keong, CBE DTech, FEng, FICE,

FIStructE, FHKIE

Members Prof. Fumihiko MAKI

BArch, MArch, MJIA, FAIA

Dr. R.L. WERNER, AM MSc, PhD

Mr. Jose LEI Meng-can, JP, FHKIA, ACIArb

Mr. CHUNG Wah-nan Hong Kong Institute of Dip Arch, ARIBA, FHKIA Architects’ nominee

Secretary Mr. K.R. ROPER Secretary of the Campus

Planning and Estate Management Sub-

Committee of the Planning Committee and Chief Professional Adviser - 17-

Chairman of the Campus Planning and Estate Management Sub-

Committee of the Planning Committee

Professor, Department of Architecture,

University of Tokyo, Japan Former President of the New South Wales Institute of Technology, Australia, and member of the UPGC Sub-Committee for The HKUST

Director of Architectural Services, Hong Kong Government

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--___ _____

38. The Assessment Panel for Stage II of the competition met from 17 to 19 November 1987. On 17 November 1987, the initial task was to examine the display drawings and model of each submission and to discuss queries raised by the Panel’s earlier consideration of the individual design reports and the Technical Advisers’ Report. The Panel was joined subsequently by the Technical Advisers who advised on various technical aspects of each submission. As a result, a provisional consensus was reached later by the Panel on three schemes that could be eliminated early, subject to further consideration, in the light of individual presentations by each of the competitors, after the second day. The first day of the final assessment concluded with the opening of the envelopes containing the six declarations of authorship and programme proposals.

39. On the second day, 60-minute audio-visual presentations were made by each of the competitors, during which Panel Members were able to seek clarification of any areas of doubt. 40. On the third and final day of the assessment, the Panel reviewed all six submissions and, after considerable detailed discussion, reaffirmed its earlier provisional identification of the three schemes to be eliminated. Assessment of the remaining three schemes resulted in a split vote in favour of the submission by Design Consultants & Lotus in association with Wong & Ouyang (HK) Ltd. When, on 20 November 1987, this teamwas publicly announced as winner of the Architectural Competition, the Assessment Panel had completed its task.

41. In accordance with the rules of the Architectural Competition, the winner was awarded the prize money of HK$l million, and each of the other five finalists received HK$150,000, within one month of the announcement of the winner.

Selection of Master Plan to be Implemented

42. The Planning Committee met on 20 November 1987 and, in presenting his report, the Chairman of the Assessment Panel was able to confirm the prediction that all the submissions had been characterised by a high quality of design and presentation, and by intense competitiveness, for which the competitors were duly commended. He pointed out that the six submissions were notable for their similarity in massing the academic facilities in a megastructure on the upper platforms of the site, and for their utilisation of the lower areas mainly for residential and, in some cases, amenity facilities. These similarities were due in considerable measure to the constraints imposed by a ready-formed site of steep terrain, the man-made ridge, the need for extensive centralised facilities, the phasing requirements and the tight design and construction programme.

43. In its consideration of the report by the Chairman of the Assessment Panel, the Planning Committee, which had earlier previewed all design submissions, re-examined the six schemes and in particular the winning design of Design Consultants & Lotus in association with Wong & Ouyang (HK) Ltd., and that of Simon Kwan & Associates in association with Percy Thomas Partnership (HK), which had attracted the next highest number of votes from the Assessment Panel. Colour photographs of the models of the designs submitted by Design Consultants & Lotus in association with Wong & Ouyang (HK) Ltd, and Simon Kwan & Associates in association with Percy Thomas Partnership (HK) are presented respectively in Appendices F and G. The Planning Committee noted that the Assessment Panel was unable

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to come to anunanimous decision on the winner. In its deliberations before making the decision on which master plan should become a blueprint for the University, the Committee decided that the submission receiving the second highest number of votes should also be considered. The Committee also took note that the rules of the competition did not commit the sponsor tousing the winner or, indeed, any of the designs entered in the competition for the construction of the University Campus. The Committee was reluctant, however, to take a hasty decision on such an important issue and decided it should meet again on the following day.

44. The Planning Committee met again on 21 November 1987 for another in-depth discussionof the relative merits of the submissions, taking into account the many important and complexissues involved. On taking a secret ballot at the end of its deliberations, the Committee was of the unanimous opinion that the design presented by Simon Kwan & Associates in association with Percy Thomas Partnership (HK) was to be preferred. A public announcement of the selection was made on the same day.

45. Unfortunately, the decision of the Planning Committee attracted some unfavourable reaction from certain quarters. Nevertheless, the Committee wishes to affirm that its decision to select the design of Simon Kwan & Associates in association with Percy Thomas Partnership (HK) was taken properly, in accordance with the published rules of the competition and in good faith, in what it felt was in the best interest of the University. A design was selected which the Committee believes is most likely to achieve its aims and to produce a University which will meet Hong Kong’s needs best.

Acauisition of the Site at Clear Water Bay

46. The First Report of the Planning Committee reproduced an aerial photograph of the site at Tai PO Tsai comprising about 55 hectares. Since then, land between the Main and Shaw sites has been added which, allowing for certain readjustments to the boundaries, has increased the total area to about 60 hectares.

47. In February 1988, the Sino-British Land Commission, whose purpose is to manage the disposal of land under provisions made in the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration on Hong Kong, was approached with a request that 60 hectares be acquired for the University campus. However, all land disposal arrangements fall within a Territory-wide limit of 50 hectares per annum and the Planning Committee, as an alternative to leasing, sought advice on other methods of allocating land for the University, including licensing and vesting.

48. In recognition of the 50 hectare constraint, a licence would have to be very carefully worded. It is understood also that experience in other countries has shown licensing to be fraught with potential legal pitfalls, and fulfilment of the need to provide the licensee with exclusive possession of the land would be no easy task.

49. The Planning Committee was advised that vesting the control and management of land and buildings in a corporate body, with no title being passed, is an arrangement that is not subject to the 50 hectare limitation and would be similar to the arrangement under the Housing Ordinance whereby the control and management of Housing Authority land and buildings are vested in the Housing Authority.

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50. The Government has made no decision to date as to which method should be used for allocating land to the University. However, it is understood that the Sino-British Land Commission will shortly take a view on the request that 60 hectares be acquired for the University campus. In the meantime, an advance possession order will be sought to enable The Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club to gain entry to the site at Clear Water Bay.

Access to the Site at Clear Water Bay

51. At present, the Main site is accessed only from the south, but the Planning Brief for the Architectural Competition made provision for a Northern Access that would link the Erskine and Main sites and provide access from the north of Clear Water Bay Road from where it was envisaged the majority of road arrivals would come. A working group, comprising representatives of the Hong Kong Government, The Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club and the Planning Committee Secretariat has been actively planning the design and construction arrangements for the new Northern Access and an improved Southern Access to the campus. 52. An attractive feature of the master plan is the provision of a bridge over a scenic ravine, outside the main entrance to the campus, which leads to a spectacular waterfall. The working group spent considerable time and effort in arriving at a solution for the Northern Access that would result in the least possible visual intrusion and maximise the amenity value to the neighbouring communities, as well as to the University itself, of what is essentially a topographical feature of not inconsiderable beauty. As a result, an attractive vehicular and pedestrian approach to the campus will be provided that offers broad vistas and a sense of grandeur to the visitor upon arrival. An artist’s impression of the main approach is shown in --- Appendix H.

53. The horizontal and vertical alignments of the Northern Access have now been agreed to facilitate full integration with the master plan. In order to effect an early completion of the road, it has been agreed that the design and construction of the bridge will be entrusted to the University and that the Highways Department of the Hong Kong Government will design and construct the section between Clear Water Bay Road and the bridge. This approach has the advantage that Highways Department can proceed with its construction work in an easterly direction from Clear Water Bay Road towards the Main site at the same time as the University will proceed with bridge construction in a westerly direction from the Main site. The road which, along with the transport interchange immediately inside the Main site, is to be maintained by Highways Department, is expected to be available for use by University construction traffic by the end of 1989.

54. The working group is now giving consideration to the construction of a new Southern Access to the University. This road will have the advantage of serving only the University, and of leaving the existing road for the exclusive use of the English Schools Foundation (ESF) school. The Southern Access will be designed and constructed by Highways Department to integrate fully with the University’s master plan, and the University will be granted temporary use of the existing road beside the ESF school site until such time as the new road is completed.

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Area Reauirements for the Campus

55. In the First Report of the Planning Committee, it was explained that the starting point for space allocation was the establishment for The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology of an upper limit for Gross Area. For planning purposes, this upper limit was set by the Secretariat of the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee (UPGC) at 18.0 m2 Gross Area per FTE by reference to other Hong Kong institutions and by taking account of the high degree of research and additional space required for the Industrial Training Centre and the Technology Transfer Centre. In arriving at the Gross Area ceiling, an overall balance area of 40% above the Net Area was assumed.

56. While involved in drafting and refining the Project Brief for issue to the Architect, it became apparent that the advice offered earlier by the UPGC had been based on broad brush guidelines issued by the United Kingdom based University Grants Committee (UGC) in 1983. Earlier documents, produced by the UGC in 1971 and 1978 and which were understood to be still in use in the United Kingdom, provided more specific details that suggested the ceiling of

18.0 m2 Gross Area per FTE was inadequate.

57. This additional information sparked off further dialogue between the respective Secretariats of the Planning Committee and the UPGC on the upper limit that should be set; on 3 January 1988, the Vice-Chancellor (Designate) met the UPGC Sub-Committee concerned with the University and, inter alia, discussed the revision of space allocation. 58. As a result of this meeting, The Hon. John Swaine, CBE, QC, JP, Chairman of the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee, wrote on 12 January 1988 to the Chairman of the Planning Committee suggesting that the Project Brief should reflect an overall provision of the order of 19 m2 Gross Area per FTE. He indicated that this advice was not intended to be an absolute constraint but was put forward as a guideline for the space requirements. Acopy of the letter is reproduced at Appendix I. In pursuance of this advice, the Planning Committee, in formulating the Project Brief, has used an upper limit for Gross Area of 19.4 m2 per FTE; this allows an average balance area of around 48%.

Production of a Video Film

59. The Planning Committee has decided that a short video film should be produced to introduce the new University to overseas recruits and to potential “friends” of the University, both locally and overseas. Neil Forsyth Associates Ltd. has been commissioned to undertake the project which will comprise, to a large extent, suitable stock film available from a variety of sources. The Committee is encouraged that all of the companies and organisations approached for permission to use appropriate excerpts from films produced by them have cooperated readily.

60. A number of individuals prominent in the tertiary education field or in education generally have agreed to participate in the film and the Committee is gratified that the Governor, Sir David Wilson, will also feature in it.

61. The Planning Committee wishes to record its appreciation of the support of The Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club which will meet the major cost of the video film production.

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Design of an Emblem

62. In considering whether a coat of arms or other distinctive device should be commissioned for the University, the Planning Committee decided that as a start it should look at the devices of other newly founded universities. In this respect, the Association of Commonwealth Universities advised that, in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Canada, Bond University and Curtin University were the only full universities that could be described as founded recently. The University of Buckingham is the newest in England but it was established in 1973 as a university college and it became a full university in 1983. Bond University, founded only in 1987, has, as yet no distinctive device. Curtin University, founded in early 1987 and formerly the long-established Western Australian Institute of Technology, has an emblem.

63. Informal advice was also obtained from the Director of Protocol who indicated that although there was no objection to the creation of a coat of arms for the University, the process, which could take up to one year, was slow and laborious.

64. In the circumstances, the Planning Committee decided that itwould be appropriate for an emblem to be devised for the University which, if possible, would combine the concept of the traditional coat of arms and a more modern technological image in keeping with the objectives of the University. The design of such an emblem does not lend itself to a public competition and an emblem is currently being designed by professional graphic designers in consultation with the Vice-Chancellor (Designate).

Issue of a Set of Special Stamps to Mark the Establishment of the Universitv

65. As a result of a suggestion from a District Board Member, the Hong Kong Post Office is considering the issue of a set of special stamps to mark the establishment of the University, and it sought advice from the Planning Committee on the appropriate timing for the issue of stamps. The Committee suggested that the timing should best coincide with projected milestones in the development of the University. These are: -

April 1988 -Formation of the Council

October/November 1989 - Foundation stone-laying ceremony October 1991- Admission of Students

October 1993 - Completion of Phase II construction

66. As the first gives too short notice for the design of stamps and the last is too far ahead, the Planning Committee suggested that the Hong Kong Post Office consider the issue of one stamp in 1989 to mark the foundation stone-laying ceremony and a set of stamps in 1991 to mark the opening of the University and the first student intake. The Post Office has now advised that it has only four special stamp issues each year available for commemorative and special events and that it would be unlikely that the University will be featured in both 1989 and 1991. It will consider the University, however, when selecting the themes for 1991. This matter is being pursued.

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PART D

PROGRESS MADE WITH ISSUES WHICH ARE ONGOING

Introduction

67. The First Report of the Planning Committee described the progress made by the Committee with certain issues which were ongoing, and which the Committee would continue

to address in the next phase of its work. In practice, to ensure parallel and related progress on each aspect of the planning task, the work of the Planning Committee is undertaken by sub- committees which give detailed consideration to specific issues. This part of the Report describes the progress made by each sub-committee since the issue of the First Report.

ACADEMIC PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT SUB-COMMITTEE

Advice from the Vice-Chancellor

68. The appointment of Professor Chia-Wei WOO, as the first Vice-Chancellor, has enabled the Academic Planning and Development Sub-Committee to obtain his reaction, in particular, to earlier proposals regarding the academic profile and the courses to be offered when teaching commences on campus in 1991.

Refinement of Academic Profile

69. To enable it to refine the preliminary academic profile produced in the First Report, the sub-committee has continued with its efforts to seek information from informed sources both in Hong Kong and overseas. The indications, however, are that the academic --- profile reproduced at Appendix J, given the difficulty in predicting Hong Kong’s economic demand in ten to fifteen years’ time, does not warrant further refinement at present. It will be used, therefore, to formulate the initial courses of study, the build-up of student numbers and the necessary resource requirements.

70. One of Hong Kong’s strengths has been its ability to identify world wide trade demand and to react quickly to that demand. Because of this dynamism the sub-committee is firm in its belief that the University should reflect this flexibility. It will, therefore, provide generalist rather than specialist undergraduate courses that allow for multi-disciplinary cross fertilisation. The sub-committee, in pursuance of this philosophy, has obtained and studied information, from a variety of tertiary institutions, on integrated courses which produce more multi-disciplined graduates.

The Initial Courses of Study

71. In consultation with the Vice-Chancellor (Designate), the sub-committee has focused on the first two years of student intake i.e. 1991/92 and 1992/93, which will be in Phase I of the campus development and in fields which require less large specialist areas or major physical services.

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School of Eneineering

72. As now envisaged, the undergraduate programmes are in several groups: - Group l- Computer Science

Electrical and Electronic Engineering Information Engineering

Group 2- Industrial/Manufacturing Engineering Group 3- Civil/Structural Engineering

Mechanical Engineering Chemical Engineering

Group 1 will be offered in 1991/92, Group 2 in 1992/93 and Group 3 will begin in 1993/94; therefore, by the end of the first triennium, all these programmes will be in operation.

73. Postgraduate programmes will be determined mainly by the needs of the community and also to some extent by the specialities of the academic staff recruited and by the availability of equipment and facilities. However, it is likely that the first group of postgraduate students in 1991/92 will tend to be theoretically or software inclined.

74. Engineering students will take classes in Business and Management, Science, and General Education.

School of Science

75. The sub-committee considers it is quite reasonable to offer courses initially in Mathematics, Biology, and the Physical Sciences since they form the backbone of all fields of engineering.

76. Postgraduate programmes will depend again on community needs, the specialities of academic staff recruited and the availability of laboratories, and it is anticipated that theoretically oriented Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology and Physics will precede other sub- disciplines.

77. Science students will take classes in Business and Management, Engineering and General Education.

School of Business and Management

78. The sub-committee has decided to adopt a general business programme for undergraduate students at the University and it will be necessary to form an integrated package with many required modules and a limited number of speciality electives; such packages are widely available in a number of varieties.

79. With regard to the postgraduate curriculum, the sub-committee is thinking in terms of two separate but complementary courses. The first is a standard two-year (or longer if part- time) MBA course, shaped to suit Hong Kong’s needs. This course will emphasise finance and entrepreneurship and will be technology oriented and, as a result, will be more practical and

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less routine. The second is a one-year Masters course in business and technology, designed for people who are already well trained or experienced in technology.

80. A management science orientation is deemed appropriate for a technological university. Students in Business and Management will be required to take some classes in Engineering and Science, gain rudimentary knowledge of a third language, be computer literate and competent in oral and verbal communication.

_____ 81. Attached at Appendix K is a preliminary statement of educational philosophy

setting out the concepts proposed for the School of Business and Management. General Education Centre

82. Of the many areas suggested in the academic profile, the most fundamental for students of the University are Chinese and China Studies, Local and Regional Studies, History and Geography, Philosophy, which will assist in critical analysis, Psychology and Linguistics, which will provide a flavour of the social science disciplines and a knowledge base for certain branches of technology (such as artificial intelligence).

83. In its First Report, the Planning Committee proposed that, in the calculation of undergraduate loading on all three Schools and the General Education Centre, the provision for General Education should be 12%. The sub-committee has, however, indicated a desire to increase the General Education provision from 12% to 18% but, pending detailed curricula designs being carried out by senior academic staff when appointed, will continue for the time being to use 12%.

Planned Growth of the Student Population

84. The introduction of Biology as a first year subject in the School of Science has affected slightly the planned growth in the student population to approximately 7,000 and --- 10,000 FTEs. This growth is demonstrated in Appendix L.

____s 85.

Appendix M outlines envisaged growth in the undergraduate population in the --- School of Engineering in terms of the courses to be offered. Appendix N provides a similar pattern for the School of Science, but, as agrowth pattern based on discipline areas in the School of Business and Management has not yet been determined, only overall student numbers have III11 beenshown in Appendix 0. Appendix P provides an envisaged growth pattern for postgraduate

students in the School of Engineering, Science and Business and Management, and in the General Education Centre.

Academic Staffing Reauirements

86. The introduction of Biology as a first year subject in the School of Science has resulted in minor changes to the estimated academic staffing requirements detailed in the First Report. --- Revised estimates covering the period from 1989/90 to 1995/96 are presented in Appendix Q.

The estimates assume that, on the average, academicstaffwill be inpost about eighteen months before courses commence but this assumption may have to be revised in light of circumstances. Both the service matrix and the intra-school distribution of student population may also be revised as senior academic staff are identified and begin to tender advice.

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Collaboration with Tndustrv and Commerce

87. On 1 July 1987, in a speech during enactment of The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Ordinance by the Legislative Council, the Hon. CHENG Hon-kwan referred to the need for collaboration between the University and industry and commerce, and emphasised that what was required was a determination not only on the part of the University authorities and academic staff, but also on the part of industrialists to create such collaboration. 88. The sub-committee has considered how the University might initiate this collaboration, and has concluded that one way, in the early years of the University, is to form advisory bodies. Initial consideration suggests that these fall into three groups: the first are those who might be described as patrons, the second are people who have extensive experience with or comprehensive views on the role of tertiary education, and the third group can be described as specialists or experts.

89. Patrons are seen as local community leaders, industrialists, top executives of multinational corporations, and regarded as potential members of the University Court.

leading businessmen and philanthropists; they are

90. Members of the second group are regarded as visionaries and would include international leaders of the academic world, leaders of industry and commerce and retired government officials who have shown commitment to tertiary education in Hong Kong. This group is seen as playing a leadership role in matching the University with industry and commerce both in Hong Kong and internationally. Membership would be drawn both locally and from overseas, and the sub-committee envisages a relatively small and exceedingly distinguished core, presiding over a large and distinguished membership.

91. The third group can be described as specialists. Membership would comprise both local and overseas experts in specific disciplines and services, including both academics and professionals. The sub-committee proposes that this group should not always be organised into formal structures but that individuals within the group should, as the need arises, be called upon to volunteer their services.

92. A list of potential members is being compiled.

Future Role of the Sub-Committee

93. It is apparent that the sub-committee has reached a stage where much of the further progress can only be made by the senior academic staff of the University and the role of the sub-committee will tend to be reactive rather than proactive.

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CAMPUS PLANNING AND ESTATE MANAGEMENT SUB-COMMITTEE Background

94. Since its change of name, on 21 September 1987, from the Capital Works and Building Projects Sub-Committee, the Campus Planning and Estate Management Sub- Committee has concerned itself primarily with arrangements for the final stages of the Architectural Competition. Its principal areas of concern have been the programme for the Stage II assessment, and the subsequent public exhibition of the architectural submissions. Programme for the Stage II Assessment

95. A key issue in planning for the assessment period was the search for a suitably large venue. The area required for the viewing in comfort of one submission, comprising nine display drawings and one or two models, was about 27 m2. The space required for the Assessment Panel, and occasionally the Technical Advisers, to confer, was of similar proportion. The facilities needed by competitors and their consultants to present their proposals to the Panel were no less demanding.

96. The sub-committee was pleased to have had the opportunity of being the first user of an exhibition area designed by the Architectural Services Department in the main lobby of the Queensway Government Offices. This facility provided a suitably secure and private area of over 80 m2 which was used for the following activities: -

4

W

Cl

d)

e)

13-15 November 1987

Preliminary viewing of all models by Planning Committee members, UPGC representatives and other Government personnel;

17 and 19 November 1987

Conference facilities for the Assessment Panel, and occasionally the Technical Advisers, contiguous with the display of two submissions at a time;

20 November 1987

Press conference to announce the winner of the competition; 21 November 1987

Press conference to announce the design to be implemented; and 23-25 November 1987

Exhibition of winning submission and the design to be implemented.

97. The sub-committee is indebted also to the Director of Architectural Services for the loan of his department’s conference room in the same building as a venue for the competitors’ presentations on 18 November 1987. Competitors made use of various visual aids to complement the information in their submissions, and the day proved stimulating for the Assessment Panel, Technical Advisers and Planning Committee members, who had been invited to attend.

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