DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING

在文檔中 The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Academic Calendar 1994-1995 (頁 61-66)

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING

Civil and structural engineers are primarily responsible for the planning, design and construction of infrastructure which includes major buildings, bridges, dams, pipe- lines, sewage and water treatment works, and various transportation systems and facilities. In order to provide workable, durable, and affordable solutions to society's infrastructure needs, civil engineers must develop an understanding of the physical laws that govern the actions of nature and its environmental forces, and the behaviour of natural and man-made materials. It is not surprising therefore that the basic research on the mechanics of solids and fluids was initially conducted by civil engineers working on solutions to practical problems. The importance of a sound knowledge base of these subjects is likely to increase in future as civil engineers are called upon to build in more hostile and delicate environments, to handle new materials, and to preserve natural resources.

As society evolves, the solutions to civil engineering problems are no longer exclusively technical issues. Instead, they require consideration of demographic trends, human aspirations, laws of supply and demand, and in general, social, economic, and political factors. The civil engineers of the future will have to develop a better appreciation and understanding of these subjects to assume their rightful place in society.

The problems civil engineers face in the next century are likely to be increasingly complex. They should beviewed, however, as a new challenge and an opportunity to play aleadership role in shaping thefutureof society, improving thequality of life and protecting the environment. To respond to this challenge, civil engineers will need a solid knowledge of the physical sciences, and an understanding of human and social behaviour, familiarity with new methodologies and evolving technologies, and acontinued eaaerness to exolore new areas and apgy the latest research results. Research efforts should be closely related to the interest and the needs of society. In this way the results will be more practical, the work itself will be more exciting and rewarding, and the contribution to mankind will be more meaningful. The civil and structural engineering programme at HKUST aims at giving students the technical skills, intellectual inspiration and apprecia- tion of human factors to meet the challenges facing modern-day civil engineers.

Faculty

Professor and Head of Department:

C.K. SHEN, BS National Taiwan; MS New Hampshire; PhD Univ of California, Berkeley

Professors:

Paul Tse-Yung CHANG, BS National Taiwan; MS, PhD Univ of California, Berkeley Gary W. HEINKE, BASc, MASc Toronto; PhD McMaster

Howard Ju-Chang HUANG, BS National Taiwan; MS, PhD Univ of Texas, Austin Adjunct Professor:

Leon Ru-Liang WANG, BS National Cheng-Kung; MS Univ of Illinois, Urbana- Champaign; ScD Massachusetts lnst of Tech

(Principal Research Engineer in the Research Centre) Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor:

Neil C. MICKLEBOROUGH, DIP.CE. Hobart Tech Coll; MEng Carleton; PhD Tasmania

(Acting Associate Pro-Vice-chancellor for Academic Affairs)

School of Engineering

LecturerdAssistant Professors:

.

/

Chun-Man CHAN, BSc, MSc Massachusetts lnst of Tech; PhD Waterloo - Guanghao CHEN, BASc Zhejiang Agriculturat; MEng, DEng Kyoto

Mark J. DAVIDSON, BSc, PhD Univof Canterbury, Christchurch Mohamed S. GHIDAOUI, BEng, MASc, PhD Toronto

Lambros KATAFYGIOTIS, DIP. CE. National Tech Univ, Athens; MS, PhD Califor- nia lnst of Tech

Jun-Shang KUANG, BSc South China lnst of Tech; PhD HongKongand Cambridge Kin-Man LEE, BESc, PhD Western Ontario

Xiang-Song LI, BS Tsing Hua; MS, PhD Univ of California, Davis Zongjin LI, BE Zhejiang; MS, PhD Northwestern

Irene Man-Chi LO, BSc National Taiwan; MSc, PhD Univ of Texas, Austin Duncan A. MCINNIS, BSc, MSc Calgary; PhD Toronto

David G. WAREHAM, BASc, MASc Waterloo; PhD British Columbia Hai YANG, BSc Wuhan; MEng, DEng Kyoto

Undergraduate Programme

The civil and structural engineering programme strikes a balance between short- term gains possible with a practice-orientedcurriculum and long-term benefitsof acquiring problem solving skills important for self-directed learning. Instead of teaching students

~rimarilv how to solve work-aday problems, the Department emphasises the fundamen- ials of engineering from a scientfic base that provide a disciplined approach for solving the characteristic ~ioblems of the ~rofession. both current and anticipated. The curricu- lum DreDares students to take on ieadership roles, emphasising the social, political and economic context in which civil engineering is practised. This broad perspective is the current educational trend considered essential for those being educated to take the lead - - .

in society and hopefully creates a truly civic-minded and environmentally-conscious profession. The curriculum also recognises that leadership requires an integrated, synthetic view of civil engineering sub-specialties along with exceptional communication skills, including the ability to work with and lead groups.

The three-year curriculum is designed to allow first-year students to take most of the basic mathematics and engineering courses in order to strengthen their understand- ing of the fundamentals which are the foundation of civil engineering. The second-year curriculum concentrates primarily on the required core courses in the civil and structural engineering programme. These courses are intended to (1) show how the various sub- specialties are inter-related and thereby provide an integrated view of the civil engineering profession; and (2) introduce various aspects of civil engineering and show how they are related to broader social, political and economic issues. During the third year of this course, students are given a choice to concentrate on 'streams" of study. Two main streams of concentration are recommended: Civil and Structural Engineering; or Civil and Environmental Engineering. Corecoursesare requiredin each of these two areas. Where a student wishes to concentrate on a different stream of specialisation, approval must be obtained from the Department. All students are required to complete five credits in an approved third-year senior project under the supervision of an advisor from either the University or industry.

Admission Requirements 1995-96

In addition to the general entrance requirements of the University, acceptable grades are required in either (1) two AL subjects (Pure Mathematics, plus Physics or

School of Engineering

Engineering Science) and two AS subjects; or (2) three AL subjects (Pure Mathematics, plus Physics or Engineering Science, and one other AL subject).

Curriculum for BEng in Civil and Structural Engineering First Year

Fall Semester

ClVL 101 C History and Practice of Civil Engineering ClVL 102 R Surveying

ClVL 11 3 C Statics and Dynamics ClVL 1 14 R Civil Engineering Drawing

COMP 102 R Computer Fundamentals and Programming (1) LANG001 Language Skills Enhancement I

MATH 100 R lntroduction to Multivariable Calculus MATH 11 3 R lntroduction to Linear Algebra

ClVL 141 C Environmental Engineering and Science CIVL 151 C Fluid Mechanics l

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective MATH 150 R lntroduction to Ordinary Differential Equations MATH 230 R lntroduction to Numerical Methods

[ I credit] ClVL 242 R Water and Wastewater Engineering ClVL 252 C Fluid Mechanics II

ClVL 271 C Geotechnical Engineering I INDE 201 R Operations Research I (3) MATH R Mathematics Elective

Spring Semester

ClVL 202 R Construction Engineering ClVL 232 C Structural Theory and Design II ClVL 253 C Hydraulics and Hydrology

ClVL 261 R Traffic and Transportation Engineering ClVL 272 C Geotechnical Engineering II

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective

19 credits

18 credits

18 credits

f

School of Engineering School of Engineering

Third Year Civil and Structural Engineering Stream Fall Semester

ClVL 334 C Structural Theory and Design lllA 13-2-0:3]

ClVL 335 C Structural Theory and Design lllB 13-2-0131 ClVL 397 C Civil Engineering Project l [O-0-5:2]

ClVL E Civil Engineering Elective [3-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0:3]

SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

t 7 credits Spring Semester

ClVL 372 C Geotechnical Engineering Ill [3-2-0:3]

ClVL 398 C Civil Engineering Project ll [0-0-8:3]

ClVL E Civil Engineering Elective [3-0-0:3]

ClVL E Civil Engineering Elective [3-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0:3]

SB&M E Bunsiness and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

18 credits Civil and Environmental Engineering Stream

Fall Semester

ClVL 345 C Environmental Analysis of Aqueous Systems [3-0-3:3]

ClVL 351 C Municipal Hydraulic Systems 13-2-0131 ClVL 397 C Civil Engineering Project l [0-0-5:2]

ClVL E Civil Engineering Elective 13-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0:3]

SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

17 credits Spring Semester

ClVL 398 C Civil Engineering Project ll [O-0-8131

ClVL E Civil Engineering Elective 13-0-0:3]

ClVL E Civil Engineering Elective [3-0-0:3]

ClVL E Civil Engineering Elective [3-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0131 SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0131 18 credits (1) Students exempted from this course by the Language Centre may replace it with

a Humanities and Social Science course.

(2) One week residential field camp during the summer session.

(3) The Mathematics Elective is to be chosen from MATH 244,351 and 352.

A minimum of 105 credits is required for the BEng programme in Civil and Structural Engineering.

Postgraduate Programmes

The postgraduate programmes in civil and structural engineering aim at training students to solve problems in civil and structural engineering by enlarging and deepening their knowledge base as well as encouraging the intellectual pursuit of creative ideas to improve human and natural environments.

The in-progress and planned projects in Hong Kong for airport construction, port facility expansion, improved road systems, pollution control, and urban re-development demand the work of large teams of civil and structural engineers in the next decade. As the practice of civil and structural engineering itself develops rapidly, the leaders of these teams are likely to be those who have broad-based and inldepth knowledge of the discipline as well as a good grasp of new design concepts and technologies. p6stgradu- ate training develops such potentials and offers excellent op~ortunities for students who wish to become future leaders in this profession. students engaging in postgraduate studies in civil and structural engineering may concentrate on structural, environmental, geotechnical, water resources, transportation, construction engineering or infrastructure development. In addition, doctoral students may also concentrate on a~plied . . mechanics and materials science.

The postgraduate programmes lead to the degrees of Master of Science (MSc), Master of Philosophy (MPhil), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Civil and Structural Engineering. The master's degree programmes focus on strengthening students' knowledge in certain areas of civil and structural engineering and exposing them to the issues involved in the conception, design, construction, maintenance, and use of structures and facilities. The PhD programme aims at developing the skills needed to identify issues related to civil and structural engineering and the ability to formulate and propose solutions to a problem in an independent manner. In addition to the above programmes, the Department also participates in the Master of Science (MSc) pro- gramme in Biotechnology.

Applicants for admission to the postgraduate programmes are required to have completed, by the time they enrol in HKUST, a bachelor's degree or equivalent in civil engineering or a related engineering field. Students must demonstrate a sound traininq in physical sciences and mathematics and a good knowledge of basic engineering skills, including the use of computers. Deficiencies must be made UD concurrentlv with postgraduate work if students are otherwise deemed admissible' to a postgraduate programme on account of their overall preparation.

In addition to satisfying the University requirements for postgraduate degrees, all students admitted to postgraduate studies in the Department of Civil and Structural Engineering must complete departmental programme requirements as summarised below.

Master of Science (MSc) in Biotechnology

This multi-disciplinary programme is jointly offered by the Departments of Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Civil and Structural Engi- neering. For details, please refer to page 97.

I

School of Engineering

Master of Science (MSc) in Civil and Structural Engineering

This programme is for students who intend to pursue a career involving engineer- ino oractice alona with manaaement resmnsibilities. The MSc is a taught degree which n&nallv reauires one and ;half vears'of full-time study. Each student is required to compleie at ieast 30 credits of app&ed subject work. Six of the credits must be a project under the supervision of an advisor from either the University or industry.

Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in Civil and Structural Engineering

To be considered for admission, applicants must have completed a bachelor's dearee in Civil Engineering with at least second class honours from a university, or an eq;ivalent from another tertiary institution. In exceptional cases applicants submitting evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be consid- ered.

The MPhil programme requires completion of at least 15 credits of course work, and all MPhil students are required to attend departmental seminars in their areas of interest. Each student must present at least one seminar summarising the major results of hisher thesis research. The candidate will normally conduct thesis research on campus although the advisor may permit a candidate to spend a period of time in the field, within another institution, or elsewhere away from the University. Candidates will present theses for examination no earlier than one and a half years and no later than five years from the date of first enrolment for the degree.

On completion of the programme of study and research, the student shall submit a thesis demonstrating competence in engineering research. The work described must have been substantially completed subsequent to enrolment for the degree. The thesis should reach a satisfactoly standard of expression and presentation, and consist of an account of the student's own research. The student may not submit as the main content of the thesis any work or material which has previously been submitted for a university degree or some other similar awards.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Civil and Structural Engineering

To be considered for admission, applicants must have obtained either a master's degree (or equivalent) in Civil Engineering (or in a related field), or a bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering with first class honours, or equivalent qualification, from a recognised university or tertiary institution. In exceptional cases, applicants submitting evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered.

The PhD programme requires completion of at least 30 credits of course work, 20 in the student's major area and 10 in a minor field. Students with a master's degree may be granted advanced standing of up to 15 credits. In general, PhD students are expected.

to maintain a

B+

average in their course work.

All PhD students are required to attend Departmental seminars in their areas of interest. At least two seminars must be presented by PhD students during the course of their programmes. An early seminar should be on the initial work or proposed area of research. One last seminar must be presented just before the final PhD defence to cover the completed work and summarise the major results of the thesis research.

School of Engineering

To become a doctoral candidate, a student must pass a qualifying examination, which takes place within 18 months of initial registration. The qualifying examination consists of both written and oral examinations. The written examination, which covers undergraduate and first-year postgraduate civil engineering materials, evaluates the student's comprehension of scientific and engineering principles and engineering synthe- sis, and the student's preparation for postgraduate study. Prior to undertaking the examinations, each PhD student will have prepared a written thesis research proposal, and will orally present and defend it. In addition, the student will answer questions of a general civil engineering nature and questions relevant to the proposed research.

Following the examinations, the examination committee will recommend that (1) the student has passed and is a candidate for the degree; or (2) the student should undertake further study to rectify deficiencies uncovered in the examination but may continue with the research component without another written or oral examination, and upon successful completion of these further studies, the student will automatically becomeacandidate forthe degree; or (3) thestudent should undertake further studies and must repeat the written andlor oral component at a later date; or (4) the student has failed and must withdraw from the PhD programme.

The candidate will normally conduct the thesis research on campus, although the advisor may permit a candidate to spend a period of time in the field, within another institution, or elsewhere away from the University.

On completion of the programme of study and research, the student shall submit a thesis demonstrating competence in engineering research. The work described must have been substantiallv completed subsequent to enrolment for the dearee. The thesis should reach a satisfactory standard of exbression and presentation, &d consist of an account of the student's own research. The student may not submit as the main content of the thesis any work or material which has previously been submitted for a university degree or some other similar awards.

A candidate holding only a first degree will normally present the thesis for examination no earlier than four years and no later than eight years from the date of first enrolment forthedegree.

f or students

holding a master's degree priorto entering the PhD programme, the time to complete the PhD proaramme will normallv be between two and a half years and six and a half years. candydates may apply f i r reductions to these periods.

Faculty Research Interests

Professor Chih-Kang SHEN, Head of Department

Soil reinforcement technology; geotechnical earthquake engineering; characterisation of soil behaviour; centrifuge model testing of earth structures; soil-structure interaction problems; land reclamation.

Professor Tse-Yung Paul CHANG

Structural analysis; finite element methods, computational mechanics; parallel computa- tion and expert systems.

Professor Gaw W. HEINKE -

~nvironmentaien~ineerin~; physical-chemical water and wastewater treatment; munici- pal urban infrastructure rehabilitation; public health and sanitation in develo~ina a " coun- tries.

School of Engineering

Professor Howard Ju-Chang HUANG

Water and wastewater treatment; development of hybrid biological reactor to accelerate waste stabilisation rate; aerationlcirculation of aquatic system for eutrophistion control and water quality improvement; removals of ammonia nitrogen and trace contaminants from drinking water; and bioremediation and transport of hazardous chemicals in the environment.

Professor Leon Ru-Liang WANG, Ad'nct Professor

Structural and earthquake engineering; civil infrastructure systems (CIS); lifeline earth- quake engineering; buried pipelines and structures; structural dynamics; structural analysis and design.

Dr Neil C. MICKLEBOROUGH, Associate Professor

Dynamic behaviour of structures and offshore platforms; load-balancing design tech- niques for partially prestressed concrete members; creep buckling of slender .reinforced and prestressed concrete columns.

Dr Chun-Man CHAN, Assistant Professor

Structural design optimisation of tall buildings; computer automated design of structures;

structural steel design; wind effects on buildings; stiffness and vibration control of structures; rehabilitation of structures.

Dr Guanghao CHEN, Assistant Professor

ath he ma tical

modelling of biotreatment processes; removal of persistentlrecalcitrant substances: develooment of innovative aerator and bioreactor; mathematical modellins of river water assessment of environmental impact.

-

Dr Mark J. DAVIDSON, Lecturer

Environmental hydraulics; atmospheric plume dispersion; ocean outfall plume dispersion;

environmental wind tunnel modelling.

Dr Mohamed S. GHIDAOUI, Assistant Professor

Numerical, mathematical and physical modelling of openand closed conduits; groundwater flow; advection and dispersion phenomena; multiphase flows; sediment transport; and nonlinear dynamical systems.

Dr Lambros KATAWGIOTIS, Lecturer

Probabilistic structural dynamics; system identification and health monitoring of struc- tures using vibration data; structural control; computational stochastic mechanics; earth- quake and wind engineering.

Dr Jun-Shang KUANG, Lecturer

Reinforced concrete structures; shear in reinforced concrete members; punching shear of concrete slabs; fracture mechanics of concrete and damage theory; tall building structures; active structural control; design for earthquake resistance.

Dr Kin-Man LEE, Assistant Professor

Numerical modelling in geotechnical engineering and its application to field problems;

tunnelling in soft ground; soil structure interaction; constitutive relationship for geological material; applications of geosynthesis in engineering problems.

School of Engineering

Dr Zong-Jin LI, Lecturer

Characterising fiber-cement and aggregate-cement interface; corrosion of re-bar in

Characterising fiber-cement and aggregate-cement interface; corrosion of re-bar in

在文檔中 The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Academic Calendar 1994-1995 (頁 61-66)