szrch as locoi7zotion, evzotion, and control

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS

Physics is the science that deals at the most fundamental level with matter and enerav, their interactions, and theirtransformation and it orovides the foundation for manv otheFsciences and for engineering. The ~ e ~ a r t m e n t concentrates its resources oil interdisciplinary and applied fields with potential relevance to technological industry. In addition to the applied physics emphasis, there is a strong offering of core subjects in the fundamental fields of physics. Undergraduates are permitted to select areas of concen- tration in the traditional as well as apGed subjects of physics. Faculty and postgraduate research focus on ootical. condensed matter and statistical ohvsics. and include ohvsics of lasers, solid staie, mesoscopic systems, devices, maieials, thin films, s;rfaces, interfaces, liquid crystals and polymers.

A number of central service facilities and interdisciplinary research institutes provide support for the Department's research programmes. Particularly relevant are the centres for Materials Characterisation and Preparation, Microelectronics Fabrication, Computing Services and Telecommunications, and the research institutes for Information Technology, Advanced Materials, Microsystems, and Scientific Computations. State-of- the-art facilities for large scale and intensive scientific computation include optical-fibre distributive networks, various workstations, and a massively parallel processing compu- ter. The Department has laboratoriesfor laser physics, photonics, newthin-film materials, surface/interfacestudies, solid state properties, polymers and liquid crystals, x-ray optics, semiconductor clusters, and non-linear dvnamics. The Zhena Ge Ru Thin Film Phvsics Laboratory, the Joyce M. Kuok Laser anh Photonics ~aboraGry, and the William

on^

Semiconductor Clusters Laboratory form a nucleus for HKUST's Advanced Materials Research Institute.

Faculty

Professor and Head of Department:

Nelson CUE, BS Feati; PhD Univ of Washi.cg;r,n Professors:

David J. BARBER, BS, PhD Bristol

(Director of Materials Characterisation and Preparation Centre)

Lerov L. CHANG. BS National Taiwan: MS South Carolina: PhD Stanford NAE:

NAS; CAS . (Dean of Science)

Peter N. DOBSON, Jr, BS Massachusetts lnst of Tech; PhD Maryland (Director of Planning and Co-ordination)

Michael M. LOY, BS, PhD Univ of California, Berkeley Ping SHENG, BS California lnst of Tech; PhD Princeton George K.L. WONG, BS, PhD Univ of California, Berkeley Chia-Wei WOO, BS Georgetown Call; MS, PhD Washington Univ

(Vice-Chancellor and President) Senior Lecturers/Associate Professors:

Kwok-Kwong FUNG, BS Cornell; MS, PhD Bristol

Wei-Kun GE, BSc Beijing; PhD Univ of Manchester lnst of Sc and Tech Zhao Qing ZHANG, BS Tunghai Taiwan; PhD Pennsylvania

Lecturers/Assistant Professors:

Michael S. ALTMAN, BA Pennsylvania; ScM, PhD Brown

School of Science

Ting CHEN, BS Zhejiang, MS. PhD Univ of California, Los Angeles Sidney C. KAN, BS Chinese Univ of Hong Kong, PhD California lnst of Tech Pak-Wo LEUNG, BSc Hong Kong, PhD Cornell

Tai-Kai NG, BSc Hong Kong, PhD Northwestern

Philip lam-Keong SOU, BS Jinan; MS, PhD Univ of Illinois, Chicago

Kwok-Yip SZETO, BA(Eng) Toronto; MA State Univof New York, Stony Brook; PhD Massachuseits lnst of Tech

Wing-Yim TAM, BS Chinese Univ of Hong Kong, PhD Univ of California, Santa Barbara

Xiang-Rong WANG, BA Wuhan; MA, PhD Rochester

Yu-Qi WANG, BS Beijng Polytechnic Univ; MS lnst of Solid State Physics, CAS;

PhD Columbia

Kam-Sing WONG, BSc London; DPhil Oxford

Michael Kwok-Yee WONG, BSc Hong Kong, MS. PhD Univ of California, Los Angeles

Rong-Fu XIAO, BS Chongqing, PhD Utah Xiao YAN, BS Beijng, PhD Pennsylvania Zhi-Yu YANG, BS Fudan; PhD Purdue

Kwong-Mow YOO, BS Malaya; MS Nebraska; PhD City Univ of New York

Undergraduate Programmes

Two Bachelor of Science degree programmes are offered. The BSc programme in Physics prepares students for a science-related career, such as teaching in secondary schools, sales and technical support in the technology sector, or for further studies in physics and related subjects. The BSc programme in Applied Physics, with options in Computational Physics, Laser and Optical Physics, and Materials Physics, is intended for students with interests in the more applied areas of physics. Upon graduation, they may enter employment in the government and private sectors or pursue postgraduate studies.

The first year cuniculum is common to both degree programmes.

Admission Requirements 1995-96

In addition to the general entrance requirements of the University, acceptable grades are required in (i) AL Physics or Engineering Science, plus either one other AL subject or two AS subjects; or (ii) one AL plus two AS subjects

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one of the subjects must 1 be AS Physics and one other must be chosen from AL Pure Mathematics, AUAS Applied

Mathematics, and AS Mathematics and Statistics.

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Curricula for BSc in Physics and BSc in Applied Physics BSc in Physics

First Year Fall Semester

PHYS 121 C Electricity and Magnetism [3-0-3:4]

COMP 102 R Computer Fundamentals and Programming [3-0-2:4]

ELEC 101 R Basic Electronics [3-1-3:4]

(1) LANG 001 Language Skills Enhancement I [0-3-1 :0]

MATH 101 R Multiiariable Calculus [3-1-0141

School of Science

Spring Semester

PHYS 126 C Introduction to Modern Physics [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 127 C lntroduction to Modern Physics Laboratory [O-0-3:1]

PHYS 221 C Intermediate Classical Mechanics [4-0-0141 H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0131

MATH 1 1 1 R Linear Algebra [3-1-0:4]

MATH 151 R Differential Equations and Applications [3-1-0:4]

19 credits Second Year

Fall Semester

PHYS 214 R Mathematical Methods in Physics [4-0-0141

OR MATH 231 R Numerical Analysis [3-1-0141

PHYS 223 C Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I [3-0-0131

PHYS 241 C Optics [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 321 C Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics [4-0-0141 H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0131

Spring Semester

C lntermediate Electricity and Magnetism II C Elementary Quantum Mechanics I E Physics Elective

E Free Elective

E Humanities and Social Science Elective

Third Year

R Advanced Experimental Physics R Elementary Quantum Mechanics II E Physics Elective

E Free Elective

E Business and Management Elective

17 credits

16 credits

17 credits Spring Semester

PHYS 332 R Introductory Solid State Physics [3-0-0131

(4) PHYS E Physics Elective [3-0-0:3]

FREE E Free Elective [3-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0:3]

SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

15 credits 16 credits

School o f Science

(1) Students may be exempted from this course by the Language Centre.

(2) A course selected from PHYS 222, 242, 250 or 262.

(3) A course selected from PHYS 335,351,354,381 or 398.

(4) A cours_e selected from PHYS 300,336,342,361 or 382.

A minimum of 100 credits is required for the BSc programme in Physics.

BSc in Applied Physics

First Year

School of Science

Spring Semester

PHYS 382 R Computational Physics I1 [3-0-3:4]

COMP E Computer Science Elective [3-0-0131

FREE E Free Elective [3-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0131 SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

16 credits (2) A course selected from PHYS 31 1,335,351,354 or 398.

A minimum of 102 credits is required for the Computational Physics Option.

Same as for the BSc programme in Physics.

Laser and Optical Physics Option Computational Physics Option

Second Year Fall Semester

PHYS 214 C Mathematical Methods in Physics [4-0-0:4]

PHYS 223 C Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I [3-0-0131 PHYS 321 C Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics [4-0-0:4]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0:3]

MATH 231 R Numerical Analysis [3-1-0:4]

18 credits

Spring Semester

PHYS 224 C lntermediate Electricity and Magnetism 11 [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 234 C Elementary Quantum Mechanics I [4-0-0:4]

COMP 171 R Data Structures and Algorithms [3-1-0:3]

FREE E Free Elective [3-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0:3]

16 credits

Third Year Fall Semester

PHYS 331 R Elementary Quantum Mechanics I1 [4-0-0141

PHYS 381 R Computational Physics I [3-0-3141

(2) PHYS E Physics Elective [3-0-0:3]

FREE E Free Elective [3-0-0:3]

SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

Second Year Fall Semester

PHYS 214 R Mathematical Methods in Physics [4-0-0:4]

OR MATH 231 R Numerical Analysis [3-1-0141

PHYS 223 C Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 241 C Optics [3-0-0131

PHYS 321 C Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics [4-0-0:4]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0131 17 credits

Spring Semester

PHYS 224 C lntermediate Electricity and Magnetism 11 [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 234 C Elementary Quantum Mechanics l [4-0-0:4]

PHYS 242 C Fibre Optics [3-0-3:4]

FREE E Free Elective [3-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0131 17 credits

Third Year Fall Semester

PHYS 31 1 R Advanced Experimental Physics [2-0-6:4]

PHYS 331 R Elementaly Quantum Mechanics I1 [4-0-0141 PHYS 335 R Quantum and Optical Electronics [3-0-0:3]

FREE E Free Elective [3-0-0131

SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

17 credits 17 credits

School of Science

Spring Semester

PHYS 336 R Fundamental of Nonlinear Optics and Photonics [3-0-0:3]

(2) PHYS E Physics Elective [3-0-0131

FREE E Free Elective [3-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective . [3-0-0:3]

SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

15 credits (2) A c h r s e selected from PHYS 300,332,342,369 or 382.

A minimum of 101 credits is required for the Laser and Optical Physics Option.

Materials Physics Option

Second Year Fall Semester

PHYS 223 C Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I [3-0-0131

PHYS 241 C Optics [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 321 R Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics [4-0-0:4]

ENGG E Engineering Elective 13-0-0131

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0:3]

16 credits

Spring Semester

PHYS 222 C Continuum Physics 14-0-0:4]

PHYS 234 C Elementary Quantum Mechanics I [4-0-0:4]

PHYS 250 C Introduction to Materials Science [3-0-0:3]

FREE E Free Elective [3-0-0:3]

HISS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0:3]

17 credits

Third Year Fall Semester

PHYS 351 R Structure and Properties of Materials [4-0-0141

PHYS 354 R Device Materials [4-0-0141

(2) PHYS E Physics Elective [3-0-0131

FREE E Free Elective [34-0:3]

SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

17 credits

School of Science

Spring Semester

PHYS 332 R Introductory Solid State Physics 13-0-0:3]

PHYS 361 R Microcharacterisation [2-0-3:3]

FREE E Free Elective [3-0-0:3]

H&SS E Humanities and Social Science Elective [3-0-0131 SB&M E Business and Management Elective [3-0-0:3]

15 credits (2) A course selected from PHYS 31 1, 331, 335, 381 or 398.

A minimum of 100 credits is required for the Materials Physics Option.

Postgraduate Programmes and Research

As a fundamental science, physics presents major challenges to the human mind and the principles of physics serve as a foundation for engineering and other sciences.

The new technologies that physics has spawned are so ingrained in our civilisation that their scientific origins are often overlooked. The discoveries of the principles of solid-state transistors which led to the miniaturisation of electronic devices, of atomic hyperfine structure and superconductivity which made possible nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, and of the laser which underpins present-day information technology are but a few examples. In addition to directly generating technological innovation, physics also indirectly supports progress throughout society by providing tools with which people in other fields create innovations.

Postgraduate programmes aim to provide students with a solid grounding in broad physics principles and techniques, an ambience for creative and innovative activities, and opportunitiesfor cross- and inter-disciplinary research. Of all areas, optical physics and condensed matter physics (CMP) have the greatest impact on our daily lives.

It is thus natural that the Department places emphasis on these fields. Research programmes include both experimental and theoretical aspects of linear and non-linear opt&, low-dimensional systems, mesoscopic systems, new materials, microstructured and nanostructured devices, and surfaces and interfaces. A Droaramme of reaularvisitina faculty members and scholars in other specialties helps ensure a breadth c? coverage-

The Department of Physics offers postgraduate programmes leading to the degrees of Master of Science (MSc), Master of Philosophy (MPhil) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).

Applicants for postgraduate programmes in Physics are expected to hold a BSc degree in Physics from a college or university of recognised standing. Selection for admission will be based on academic records and available results of standardised tests in physics, proficiency in the English language, a one-page essay on reasons for pursuing postgraduate study, two letters of reference, and a personal interview at the discretion of the ~epartment. -

Master of Science (MSc) in Physics

The MSc programme emphasises course work to strengthen students' general background knowledge in physics and is preparation for careers in teaching or advanced

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School o f Science

work in industry. The duration of the programme normally rangesfrom 18 months to three years for full-time studies, and can be extended to five years for part-time studies.

Students with afirst degree in an area other than that of their postgraduate programme may be required to take additional courses.

In fulfilling degree requirements, students are expected to attend and present seminars, undertake course work and complete an assigned project. The nhimum numberof credits to fulfil thedeqree requirements is30. The Dassina standard foraaraded course is C and the overall average must be B or above. '

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Students can select courses from the list below to satisfy the degree requirement.

Normally students should include PHYS 513, 520, 525, and 531 in their selection.

PHYS 51 1

Master of Science (MSc) in Materials Science and Engineering

This multidisciplinary programme is jointly offered by the Departments of Chem- istry, Physics, Chemical Engineering, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Me- chanical Engineering. For details, please refer to page 99.

Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in Physics

The MPhil is a research degree and the programme is designed to prepare students for teaching, further postgraduate studies, or advanced work in industry. The duration of the programme normally ranges from 18 months to three years for full-time studies, and can be extended to five years for part-time studies. Students with a first degree in an area other than their postgraduate programme may be required to take additional courses. After one year, students registered in the MPhil programme may apply to transfer to the PhD programme.

In fulfilling the degree requirements, students are expected to attend and present seminars. undertake course work and conduct thesis research. The ~assina standard in a graded course is C and the overall average must be B or above. In ihefinistage of the programme, students are required to submit theses to the Department and, subsequently, to present and defend them. Any student who has performed unsatisfactorily will be asked to re-submitthe thesis. The result of thesecond attempt of thethesis defence will beeither Pass or Fail.

During the first two semesters of residence, full-time students are expected to register in postgraduate courses with combined credits of six or more per semester from the list of courses below. Normally students should include PHYS 51 3,520,525, and 531 in their selection.

Theory of Many-Particle Systems Special Topics

Students are also required to satisfactorily complete the following:

PHYS 600 Physics Seminars for two semesters PHYS 699 MPhil Thesis Research

presentation and oral defence of the MPhil thesis

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Physics

The PhD degree is conferred primarily in recognition of breadth of scholarship, d e ~ t h of research, and power to investigate problems independently and efficiently. The duiation of the programme normally ranges from four to eight years from the first degree, with a reduction of 18 months if a relevant Master's dearee is earned prior to enterina the PhD programme. Students with a first degree in a n area other than that of iheir postgraduate programme may be required to take additional courses.

In fulfilling the degree requirements, students are expected to attend and present seminars, undertake course work and conduct thesis research. The passing standard in a graded course is C and the overall average must be B or above. Students are also required to pass a comprehensive/qualifying examination set by the Department. In the final stage of the programme, students are required to submit theses to the Department and, subsequently, to present and defend them. Any student who has performed unsatisfactorily will be asked to re-submit the thesis. The result of the second attempt of the thesis defence will be either Pass or Fail.

During the first two semesters of residence, full-time students are expected to register in postgraduate courses with combined credits of six or more per semester from the list of courses below.

PHYS 51 1 Mathematical Methods in Physics PHYS 51 3 Advanced Classical Mechanics PHYS 520 Classical Electrodynamics I PHYS 521 Classical Electrodynamics II PHYS 525 Quantum Mechanics I PHYS 526 Quantum Mechanics II

School of Science School of Science

PHYS 531 Statistical Mechanics I [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 532 Statistical Mechanics II [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 540 Projects in Experimental Physics [O-1-6:3]

PHYS 591 Solid State Physics I [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 592 Solid State Physics II [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 594 Theory of Many-Particle Systems [3-0-0:3]

PHYS 681 Special Topics [ I -4 credit(s)]

Students are also required to satisfactorily complete the following:

qain admission to PhD candidacy by:

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i) completing &tisfactorily a departmental qualifying examination;

ii) completing three semesters of full-time study, and iii) achieving a satisfactory academic record.

PHYS 600 Physics Seminars for two semesters WHYS 799 Doctoral Thesis Research

presentation and oral defence of the PhD thesis

Faculty Research Interests Professor Nelson CUE, Head of Department

Atomic collisions in solids; x-ray optics and microscopy; production and properties of clusters; spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and nuclei; radiation effects.

Professor David J. BARBER,

Director of Materials Characterisation and Preparation Centre

Physics of materials; materials processing and characterisation; electron microscopy;

phase transitions; deformation micromechanisms; sol-gel-derived thin films; ferroelectric oxides; electrochromic organics.

Professor Leroy L. CHANG, Dean of Science

Semiconductor physics, materials and devices; low dimensional electron systems;

quantum heterostructures.

Professor Peter N. DOBSON, Director of Planning and Co-ordination Theory of elementary particles and their interactions at high energy.

Professor Michael M. LOY

Nonlinear optical propagation effects, two-photon coherent transients, nonlinear optical studies of surfaces, state-selective studies of molecule-surface interactions; recent work involves desorption of molecules from surfaces induced by femtosecond laser pulses.

Professor Pina SHENG

Wave and electronic transport in disordered materials; composites flow in porous media;

liquid crystals; wave localisation; granular metals; complex fluids.

Professor George K. L. WONG

Nonlinear optics; nonlinear optical properties of liquid crystals, polymers, and Langmuir- Blodgett films; optical and transport properties of semiconductors; molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of narrow band gap semiconductors; and electron-hole drops in semicon- ductors.

Professor Chia-Wei WOO, Vice-Chancellor and President

Quantum many-body theory; statistical mechanics; low temperature physics; surface physics; liquid crystals.

Dr Kwok-Kwong FUNG, Senior Lecturer

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED); microstructure, defects and phase transitions in crystalline materials.

Dr Wei-Kun GE, Associate Professor

Semiconductor physics: optical spectroscopy; point defects; quantum wells and superlattices; lattice dynamics; non-linear optical properties; material characterisation;

device-related material problems.

Dr. Zhao-Qing ZHANG, Associate Professor

Theoretical condensed matter physics: including many-body theory, fractals, electronic structure and transport in disordered systems, wave propagation and localisation in random media, and mesoscopic physics.

Dr Michael S. ALTMAN, Assistant Professor

Surface physics; low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM); scanning tunnelling/atomic force microscopy (STMIAFM).

Dr Ting CHEN, Assistant Professor

Scanning probe microscopy studies of surfaces, surface absorbates, clusters, nanoscale structures and collective excitations on surfaces.

Dr Sidney C. KAN, Assistant Professor

Device fabrication technology, physics, and novel materials in areas of integrated optics, micromachines, fiber optics, optoelectronics, photonics, and electronics. Optical fiber communication technology.

Dr Pak-Wo LEUNG. Assistant Professor

Computational condensed matter physics: including classical Monte Carlo simulations of two-dimensional systems, quantum Monte Carlo simulations of helium films, and exact diagonalisation of quantum spin systems.

Dr Tai-Kai NG, Lecturer

Theoretical condensed matter physics and statistical physics: including Fermi liquid theory, mesoscopic systems and quantum transport, density functional theory, high-Tc superconductors and quantum-spin systems.

Dr lam-Keong SOU, Assistant Professor

Molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth and characterisation of Il-VI variable band gap semiconductor alloys; infrared laser devices; transport properties; structural study of Delta doping and Hetero-interfaces.

Dr Kwok-Yip SZETO, Lecturer

Growth phenomenon; quasicrystal and amorphous structure; frustrated spin systems;

berry phase; magnetotransport; genetic algorithms and nonlinear forecasting.

Dr Wing-Yim TAM, Lecturer

Non-linear dynamics, chaos, fractals, pattern formations; cellular dynamics.

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Dr Xiang-Rong WANG, Assistant Professor

Kineticaggregation and fractal physics; mesoscopic physics in thevariable range hopping regime; molecular dynamics of liquids and the study of electrode-electrolyte interface;

statistical physics of disordered system.

Dr Yu-Qi WANG, Lecturer

Growth kinetics and surface microstructures of compound semiconductors; optical and electrical properties of semiconductor quantum structures and devices; long wavelength semiconductor lasers; wide gap Ill-V semiconductor materials.

Dr Kam-Sing WONG, Lecturer

Ultrafast lasers; time-resolved spectroscopy; light scattering in a random medium;

semiconductor and polymer physics.

Dr Michael Kwok-Yee WONG. Lecturer

Physics of complex and disordered systems; neural networks; combinatorial optimisation;

spin glasses; interface growth and corrosion; dynamics and control of telecommunication network traffic. -

Dr Rong-Fu XIAO, Assistant Professor

Thin film and crystal growths; nanocluster fabrications; Monte Carlo simulation of pattern formations in material processing; physics of materials.

Dr Xiao YAN, Assistant Professor

Dr Xiao YAN, Assistant Professor

在文檔中 The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Academic Calendar 1994-1995 (頁 49-55)