The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Academic Calendar 1994-1995

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Mission

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology O 1994

Postal Address : The Hong Kong University of Science & Technology Clear Water Bay

Kowloon. Hong Kong

(From 1 January, 1995, add '2' in front of the following telephone and fax numbers.) Telephone : 358 6000

Facsimile : 358 0545 (General Enquiries) 358 0769 (Admission Enquiries)

This Academic Calendar is produced by the Office of Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs.

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Chancellor

The Right Honourable Christopher PAlTEN Chairman of the Council Sir Sze-Yuen CHUNG. GBE. JP

Vice-Chairman of the Council Dr CHENG Hon.Kwan.OBE. JP

Treasurer of the Council The Honourable LAU Wah.Sum. OBE. JP

Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Chia-Wei WOO. BS. MA. PhD Pro-Vice-chancellor for Academic Affairs Professor Shain-Dow KUNG. BSc. MSc. PhD Pro-Vice-chancellor for Administration and Business

Mr Ian F

.

C

.

MACPHERSON. CBE. MA Pro-Vice-chancellor for Research and Development

Professor Eugene WONG. BS. AM. PhD

The University Introduction

...

1 Academic Faculty

...

1 Students

...

2 Undergraduate Programmes

...

2 Postgraduate Programmes

...

3

The Academic Year

...

5

Admission of Students Undergraduate Admission

...

8

Undergraduate General Admission Requirements

...

8

~epaimental Entrance Requirements fbr Undergraduate Programmes

...

9

Entrance Reauirement Eauivalents

...

11

Requirements for Mature Applicants

...

12

Admission with Advanced Standing

...

12

Application for Admission through JUPAS

...

12

...

Direct Admission 13 Postgraduate Admission

...

13

Application for Admission

...

14

Students from Overseas

...

14

Admission Enquiries

...

15

Fees. Scholarships and Financial Assistance Fees for 1994-95 Academic Year

...

16

Scholarships

...

17 Financial Assistance

...

17 Academic Regulations Terminology

...

18 Programme

...

18 Option

...

18 Stream

...

18 Concentration

...

18 Department

...

18 Major Department

...

18 Course

...

1 8 Course Code

...

19

Course Vector and Credits

...

19

General Regulations

...

20

Student Conduct

...

20

Acadmic Integrity and Discipline

...

20

Examination Guidelines for Students

...

22

Intellectual Property Rights

...

23

Use of Human or Animal Subjects

...

23

Variance from Regulation

...

23

Regulations Governing Undergraduate Studies

...

23

Undergraduate Programmes

...

23

Programme Registration

...

24

Course Registration

...

25

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Contents Contents

Advanced Standing

...

27

Assessment

...

28

English Language Requirements

...

30

Academic Standing

...

31

Graduation and Degree Classification

...

31

...

Inter-departmentaVProgramme Transfer 32 Programme Withdrawal

...

32

Regulations Governing Postgraduate Studies

...

33

Programme Registration

...

33

...

Course Registration 34 Course Exemption

...

35 Advanced Standing

...

36 Assessment

...

36

Conduct of Thesis Examinations

...

38

Thesis Format

...

39 Academic Standing

...

39 Residence Requirements

...

39 MSc and MA Programmes

...

40 MBA Programme

...

40 MPhil Programmes

...

40 PhD Programmes

...

41 Graduation

...

41

...

Inter-departmentaVProgramme Transfer 41 Programme Withdrawal

...

41 School of Science 44 Department of Biochemistry

...

45 Department of Biology

...

51 Department of Chemistry

...

60 Department of Mathematics

...

68 Department of Physics

...

85

Joint Degree Programmes

...

97

Master of Science Programme in Biotechnology

...

97

Master of Science Programme in Materials Science and Engineering

...

99

School of Engineering 101 Department of Chemical Engineering

...

103

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

...

109

Department of Computer Science

...

120

De~artment of Electrical and Electronic Engineering .

...

131

Department of Industrial Engineering

...

139

Deoartment of Mechanical Enaineerina

. .

...

1 4 8 Joint Degree Programme

...

156

Bachelor of Engineering Programme in Computer Engineering

...

156

School of Business and Management 159 Department of Accounting

...

164

Department of Economics

...

169

Department of Finance

...

173

Department of Information and Systems Management

...

177

Department of Management of Organisations

...

184

Department of Marketing

...

187

Postgraduate Programmes in the School of Business and Management

...

191

...

MBA Programme 191

...

PhD Programme 198 School of Humanities and Social Science 202

...

Division of Humanities 203

...

Division of Social Science 210

...

Joint Degree Programme 214

...

Master of Arts (MA) in Chinese Studies 214 Academic Services

...

University Library 215

...

Language Centre 215 Centre of Computing Services and Telecommunications (CCST)

...

217

...

Educational Technology Centre (ETC) 217

...

Industrial Training Centre 218 Interdepartmental Research Units

...

Research Centre 219

...

Research Institutes 219

...

Institute for Environmental Studies 220 Biotechnology Research Institute

...

220

Hongkong Telecom Institute of Information Technology

...

221

...

Sino Software Research Centre 221

...

Central Research Facilities 222 Materials Characterisation and Preparation Centre

...

222

...

Microelectronics Fabrication Centre 2 2 2

Student Services

...

Student Counselling Service 224

...

Physical Education and Sports 224

...

Student Health Service 224

...

Residential Halls 224

...

Student Activities 224

...

Student Amenities 225

Undergraduate Course Descriptions 228

Postgraduate Course Descriptions 288

The University Ordinance 345

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Contents

University Council 362

University Court 363

University Senate 364

Standing Committees of Senate 366

Adviso y Committees 377

Staff List

University Administration

...

382

...

Schools and Academic Departments 384

Administrative and Service Units

...

401

Staff Index 41 1

Subject Index 426

Maps of the University Campus 430

Important Dates in the 1994-95 and 1995-96 Academic Years

THE UNIVERSITY

Introduction

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) was incorpo- rated in April 1988, and opened in October 1991, as a technological university dedicated to the advancement of learning and scholarship, with speciai emphasis on research, postgraduate education, and close collaboration with business and industry.

The University occupies an impressive 60-hectare site on the northern end of Clear Water Bay Peninsula at Tai Po Tsai. Situated on the slopes along the shore, the campus grounds are terraced to afford buildings on all levels with unobstructed panoramic views of the sea.

The campus is being built in three phases. Phase I was completed in July 1991 and has a capacity of 2,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) undergraduate and postgraduate students. Phase 11, bringing capacity to about 7,000 FTE students, was completed in January 1993. With the completion of Phase Ill (contingent upon approval of funds), the University will be able to accommodate a student body of 10,000 FTE students.

The major source of financial support forthe University is the Government of Hong Kong through the University and PolytechnicGrants Committee (UPGC) and its Research Grants Council (RGC). Student fees, other sources of research support and donations are also significant contributors to the University's budget which will exceed $1 billion in 1994-95. Construction of Phases I and II of the campus was assisted by a grant from the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club of almost $2 billion towards the cost of over $3.2 billion. The Vice-ChancellorIPresident is the chief executive officer and the three principal branches of the University are Academic Affairs, Administration and Business, and Research and Development, each headed by a Pro-Vice-chancellor. Within Academic Affairs are the four schools which comprise the academic heartland of HKUST, each school being divided into departments or divisions. As well, there are a number of academic service units and research units located administratively within the branch. Administration and Business is concerned with the non-academic administrative and financial operation of the University, and Research and Development focuses on research administration and contractual and applied research relevant to Hong Kong's technologi- cal and socio-economic development.

Three of the University's schools

-

Science, Engineering, and Business and

Management

-

provide both undergraduate and postgraduate education. The School of

Humanities and Social Science offers postgraduate education, and general education for all undergraduates. As the medium of instruction is English, class& aimed at improving English Language skills are available to students, as needed.

To complement the schools and their constituent academic departments, the Universitv has set UP interdisci~linaw research institutes, the Research Centre and the ~ e c h n o l o ~ ~ ~ransfer Centre to faciliiate collaboration among the different schools and partnerships between the University and the public and private sectors.

Academic Faculty

, With a policy calling for one faculty member for every 11 students, the University recruits worldwide for faculty who have achieved excellence in their fields and are highly respected as both teachers and researchers. These include both established academics and promising younger scholars. More than 85% have earned doctorates, pursued postdoctoral studies, or taught at the world's leading research universities.

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7%e University The University

These men and women care about Hona Kona. its ~eoole and its future. Thev

have broad intellectual interests, and wish to wokcollaborati~el~with colleagues in oth& fields and interact with professionals in industry, commerce and the public services. Most importantly, they care about their students.

The University began instruction in 1991 with some 100 faculty, a large percent- age of whom were in senior positions. Bv the end of 1994 about 350 academics will have been appointed. Presently at a lower leiel, the steady-state student-faculty ratio should be 11:l.

Students

The University seeks highly qualified and motivated young men and women with wide interests who have received a well-rounded secondary education. In addition to having achieved good grades, they should be active participants in diverse activities and possess great potential.

Most undergraduates enterthe University at age 18 or 19, and 40% have siblings attending post-secondary educational institutions although many fewer have fathers (1 3%) or mothers (6%) with this level of education. All undergraduates are Hong Kong residents but the number of non-local postgraduates is around 20% of the total postgradu- ate population.

The University's goal is to engage its students in a continuous dialogue, to challengethem intellectually, andtoencouragethemtothinkon their own and to learn how to learn. Thus the University's graduates will become competent professionals, innova- tive leaders in their fields, adaptable and versatile generalists, and sensitive, caring citizens.

Undergraduate Programmes

Undergraduate programmes normally require full-time attendance for three academic years. The curriculum is founded on acredit-basedsystem, and all undergradu- ate programmes lead to honours degrees. HKUST believes in total education and the credit-based structure of undergraduate academic programmes strikes a compromise between the sharp focus prevalent in traditional Chinese and British universities and the broad approach characteristic of American universities. To ensure breadth of education, undergraduates take over one-third of their credits outside their major department, with at least 12 credits in the School of Humanities and Social Science and the remaining credits spread over subjects offered by other departments. For graduation students need to accumulate a total of 100-105 course credits, as specified for each programme.

First-degree programmes offered are:

Programme SCHOOL OF SCIENCE Bachelor of Science (BSc) Biochemistry Biology Chemistry Code Mathematics Physics Applied Physics SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Bachelor of Engineering (BEng)

Chemical Engineering

Civil and Structural Engineering Computer Engineering Computer Science Electronrc Engineering Industrial Enaineerina Mechanical cngineeing

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)

Accounting E220

Economics E240

Finance E250

Information and Systems Management E231

Management of Organisations E261

Marketing E270

Bachelor of Science (BSc) Economics

Postgraduate Programmes

The University offers postgraduate programmes leading to master's and doctoral degrees in all four Schools, as indicated below:

Programme Code

SCHOOL OF SCIENCE Master of Science (MSc)

Biotechnology* M511

Materials Science and Engineering* M517

Mathematics MI41

Physics MI51

Master of Philosophy (MPhil) Biochemistry

Biology Chemistry Mathematics Physics

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The Univwsitv Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Biochemistry Biology Chemistry Mathematics Physics SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Master of Science (MSc) Chemical Engineering

Civil and Structural Engineering Computer Science

Electrical and Electronic Engineering lndustrial Engineering

Mechanical Engineering Master of Philosophy (MPhil)

Chemical Engineering

Civil and Structural Engineering Computer Science

Electrical and Electronic Engineering Industrial Engineering

Mechanical Engineering Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Chemical ~ n g i & r i n ~ ' Civil and Structural Enaineerina " u

Computer Science

Electrical and Electronic Engineering Industrial Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT Master of Business Administration (MBA) Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Accounting Economics Finance Information Systems Management of Organisations Management Operations

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE Master of Arts (MA)

Chinese Studies Humanlies Social Science

The University

Master of Philosophy (MPhil) Humanities

Social Science Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Humanities

The Academic Year

The academic year of the University begins on 1 July and ends on 30 June of the following year. It normally includes a Fall Semester commencing in early September and a Spring Semester beginning mid-February. Immediately following the end of the 14th week there is a short study break followed by a week devoted to examinations. There is a one-week break in the Spring Semester around Easter. A Winter Session is held between the two semesters for special academic programmes, research symposia, and other activities. A Summer Session bridges the end of the Spring Semester and the beginning of the following Fall Semester. For most students, attendance for the Winter and Summer sessions is not required.

Important dates for the 1994-95 and provisional dates for the 1995-96 academic years are found at the end of this Calendar.

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Admission o f Students

To qualify for admission to the University, applicants must normally

be

at least 17 years of aQe by the first day of the Academic Year to which they are seeking admission, meet the general entrant% requirements of the University and the requirements of the particular programme for which they are applying, and apply before the application deadline.

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UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION

Entry to an undergraduate programme of study at the University requires

prospective students to saflsty both thegeneral univer* and specific departmental

entrance reauirements. A~olicants mav

be

reauested to attend Dersonal interviews and/ or take addGonal tests to

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administeied by h e University. lnterviews are designed for the purpose of providing further assessment of the applicant's motivation, aptitude and overall suitability for the chosen field of study.

~

Undergraduate General Admi=ion Requirements

The general University requirements for entry in the 1995-96 academic year include ALL of the following :

I

A. Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (HKCEE)

passes in at least seven subjects at the first and second attempts, of which i. at least five must be passed at a single sitting; and

ii. three must

be

Mathematics, English Language (Syllabus A or B), and

either Chinese or

an

alternative language

I

B. Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)

i. passes in the same sitting in

a. either one Advanced Level (AL) subject plus two Advanced

Supplementary (AS) subjects, ortwo AL subjects; and

b. either AS Chinese Language and Culture(l).n, or AS Liberal

Studies and

ii. pass in AS Use of English (UE)@)

For applicants with HKALE qualifications obtained priorto 1994, passes in at least three AL subjects and Use of English are required.

Departmental Entrance Requirements for Undergraduate Programmes

In addition to the general requirements, applicants for 1995-96 entry must also satisfy entrance requirements specific to their desired programmes of study. Unless othewise specified, AS level subjects referred to below exclude Use of English, Chinese Language and Culture, and Liberal Studies(').

School of Science

(1) Alternatively, a pass in M Chinese Literahrre is acceptable in lieu of AS Chinese Language and Culture, in w i W ~ case the sludent is requiredto passin a d d i i eidher(i) one AL subject plus one AS subject; or(ii) three . ASsutqects.

(2) F o r a p p l i i who use an alternative language, rather man Chinese, to satisfy the language requirements i n h HKCEE, anASsubjedmaybeusedasasubstiMeforhChineaeLanguageandCulture requirement.

(3) All ~tudentsa~ttedwith a UE grade belowC will be required to attend and passa noncrediibearing English language enhancement cwrse during the first year of attendance.

Programme BSc in Biochemistry BSc in Biology BSc in Chemistry BSc in Mathematics BSc in Physics BSc in Applied Physics

(1) In thecase that an applicant obtains passes in both^^ Chinese Language and Culture, and Liberal Studies, the latter may be used to satisfy departmental entrance requirements.

Departmental Entrance Requirements

2AL

+ IAUAS (AL Chemistry

+

AUAS Biology

+

one other subject)

2AL

+

1 AUAS (AL Biology

+

AUAS Chemistry

+

one other subject)

2AL (Chemistry+ oneof Biology, Phys-

ics, Pure Mathematics orApplied Mathematics)

+

IAUAS (Biology, Physics, Pure Math- ematics, Applied Mathematics or Mathematics and Statistics) Candidates arediscouragedfrom using two math- ematics subjects to satisfy the requirements.

2AL (Physics

+

Pure Mathematics)

+

l A U A S

1 AL (Physics orEngineering Science)

+

1AU2AS

OR 1AL+2AS (AS Physics

+

one of AL Pure

Mathematics, ALIAS Applied Mathematics or AS Mathematics & Statistics

+

1 other subject)

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Admission of S t u d a t s

School of Engineering

BEng in Chemical Engineering Programme

BEng in Civil and Structural Engineering

Departmental Entrance Requirements

BEng in Computer Engineering

2AL

+

2AS (AUAS subjects must be chosen

from Applied Mathematics, Biol- ogy, Chemistry, Engineering Sci- ence, Physics, Pure Mathemat- ics and Mathematics and Statis- tics)

OR 3AL (subjects must be chosen from

Applied Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering Science, Physics and Pure Mathematics)

2AL (Pure Mathematics

+

Physics or

Engineering Science)

+

2AS

OR 3AL (Pure Mathematics

+

Physics or

Engineering Science

+

one other subject)

2AL (Pure Mathematics

+

Physics or

Engineering Science)

+

2AS

OR 3AL (Pure Mathematics

+

Physics or

Engineering Science

+

one other subject)

BEng in Computer Science

2AL (Pure Mathematics

+

one other

subject)

+

2AS

OR 3AL (Pure Mathematics

+

two other

su bjecs)

BEng in Electronic Engineering

2AL (Pure Mathematics

+

Physics

or Engineering Science)

+

2AS

OR 3AL (Pure Mathematics

+

Physics or

Engineering Science +one other subject)

Admission of Students

School of Business and Management

BEng in Industrial Engineering

BEng in Mechanical Engineering

Programme School Entrance Requirements

general requirements of the University. BSc in Economics

2AL + 2AS (AUAS subjects must be chosen from Applied Mathematics, Biol- ogy, Chemistry, Computer Appli- cations, Design and Technology, Engineering Science, Physics, Pure Mathematics andMathemat- ics and Statistics)

OR 3AL (subjects must be chosen from

Applied Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering Science, Physics, and Pure Mathematics)

2AL (Pure Mathematics

+

Physics or

Engineering Science)

+

2AS

OR 3AL (Pure Mathematics

+

Physics or

Engineering Science +one other subject)

Entrance Requirement Equivalents

Alternatively, the general entrance requirements may be satisfied by obtaining one of the following qualifications :

(a) i. General Certificate of Secondary EducationIGeneral Certificate of Education

at Ordinary Level

-

passes in at least seven subjects at the first and second attempts, including Mathematics, English Language and a language other than English, with five of the subjects to be passed at a single sitting; and

ii. General Certificate of Education at the Advanced LeveMAdvanced Supple- mentary Level

-

passes in the same sitting in 1 ALsubject plus 3AS subjects; or 2 ALsubjects plus 1 AS subject; orat least 3 AL subjects.

(b) at least one year's successful full-time study or equivalent in a bachelor's degree programme at a university or a tertiary institution recognised by this University;

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Admission of Students

(c) a professional diploma, higher diploma or higher certificate from a polytechnic or recognised tertiary college in Hong Kong;

(d) an International Baccalaureate.

Notwithstanding the above, the University may recognise other qualifications from. or successful studv at, an overseas institution. In assessing such qualifications, the university will ensure that overseas applicants have an educational background equiva- lent to that required of local candidates. Proficiency in English is also a consideration.

Requirements for Mature Applicants

Applicants who do not satisfy the general or departmental entrance requirements of the University but are aged 25 or over by the first day of the academic year to which admission is sought may be granted exemption from the entrance requirements of the University provided they can demonstrate aptitude and suitability for admission to a particular programme of study.

Admission with Advanced Standing

Applicants from universities, polytechnics or other postsecondary institutions who have completed/are studying curriculum relevant to the programme(s) for which they are applying may choose to b;, admitted with advanced standing. However, applications for direct entry to the second year or later will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Application for Admission through JUPAS

Applicants who are seeking admission on the strength of their Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination results should apply via the "Joint University and Polytech- nic Admissions System" (JUPAS)

.

This system enables applicants to apply on the strength of their HKALE resultsfor admission to the undergraduate programmes in UPGC institutions. A fee of $350 is charged for each 1995-96 application.

For reference, the following are important dates for the 1995 admission exercise. Please note that these dates are provisional and subject to minor adjustments.

1 November 1994 Closing date for applications for admission

30 November 1994 All applicants receive application checklists of per-

sonal data and choices of study programmes

16 December 1994 Final date for applicants to report errors, if any, in

application checklists to the JUPAS Office

January 1995 onwards Interviews and tests, where appropriate

19 May 1995 Final date for applicants to request IN PERSON

changes of their choices of study programmes to the JUPAS Office

Late May 1995' Announcement of HKAL UE examination results

Admission of Students

Early July 1995 Announcement of HKALE results

1 1 August 1995 Publication of results of the main round offer in Sing

Tao Jih Pa0

11

-

14August 1995 Publication of results of the main round offer in The

Hongkong Standard

11 - 14August 1995 Applicants to reply IN PERSON to offers in the main

round to the institutions concerned

Mid August to Subsequent rounds of selection by individual institu-

September 1995 tions, if vacancies are still available. A~olicants. if

selected, receive notifications direct from ihe institu- tions concerned

Provisional - to be confirmed by the Hong Kong Examinations Authority

Direct Admission

Applicants who are not eligible to apply for admission through JUPAS, including those from overseas, or those currently enrolled in full-time and sandwich degree programmes of one of the institutions within the JUPAS scheme, should apply to the University for direct admission. However, in accordance with guidelines on the inter- institutional transfer of students, applicants wishing to transfer from the first year of afull- time degree programme to the first year of the same or similiar discipline/study area at HKUST will be considered only in very exceptional cases.

Copies of the Undergraduate Prospectus and application forms for entry in September 1995 will be available from 1 October 1994 at :

Admissions, Registration and Records Office The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Clear Water Bay

Kowloon Hong Kong

Applicants for 1995-96 entry are required to pay an application fee of HK$120. The completed application should be returned to the University at the above address by 31 December 1994. Applicants may select up to three degree programmes, to be listed in the order of their preference. Subsequent changes are not normally permitted.

POSTGRADUATE ADMISSION

Applicants seeking admission to a master's degree programme should have obtained a first degree from this University or a recognised institution, or obtained an approved equivalent qualification; and satisfied the school and department concerned as to their fitness as well as their English ability to pursue the postgraduate programme.

Tn be eligible for admission to a PhD degree programme, applicants should normally have obtained a master's degree from this University or an approved institution, or presented evidence of satisfactory work at the postgraduate level on a full-time basis for at least one year, or on a part-time basis for at least G o years; and satisfied the school and department concerned as to their chosen subiect of research. as well as their fitness and English ability to undertake the research.

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Admission of Students

Selected applicants may be invited for interview. Successful applicants will receive an offer of -admission from the school or department concerned, and may be reauired to satisfv specified conditions. Applicants receiving an offer will be expected to

. .

accept or decline by a specified date.

Application for Admission

Application forms for admission to postgraduate programmes are available directly from:

Admissions, Registration and Records Office The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Clear Water Bay

Kowloon Hong Kong

The closing date for the return of the application forms is 15 March for admission in September of the same year, but late applications may be considered. Items to be subniitted with the complet-ed application form include a one-page statement on study ~ l a n s and career aoals: two letters of recommendation mailed directly to the Director of ~dmissions, ~egktratibn and Records; and officially certified academic transcripts of undergraduate studies (and postgraduate studies, if any). If official transcripts are in a language other than English or Chinese, a certified translation into English must be provided.

STUDENTS FROM OVERSEAS

The University welcomes applications from overseas students who are seeking admission to full-time studies at the undergraduate or postgraduate level. Applicants should be aware, however, that competition for admission is such that only very well- qualified candidates will gain admission.

Details of the application procedure are given in the section "Direct Admission". However, because of differences between the educational system in Hong Kong and those in other countries, students eligible to enter undergraduate programmes in their own countries mav find that their qualifications are not necessarily recognised for entry to the first year ~{HKUST. prospective overseas undergraduate students should first write to the Director of Admissions, Registration and Records, providing full details of their educational qualifications so that an initial assessment may be made as to their entry qualifications.

Admission of Students

respectively per residential year (280 days). In addition monies will be needed for subsistence, textbooks, local travel, sports equipment, clothing, and other personal needs. A total of at least $63,000 per academic year (9 months) is likely to be required for undergraduate study and $71,000 for postgraduate study.

Students from overseas must obtain a visa in order to study in Hong Kong. Applications should be made well in advance at a British Consulate or High Commission orvisa Office, or by writing directly to the Hong Kong Immigration Department, 2/F, Tower 11,7 Gloucester Road, Wanchai, Hong Kong. Applicants will be required to show sufficient financial resources to cover expenses for their period of study. Applicants must also nominate a sponsor who is resident in Hong Kong, aged over 21, to whom they are known personally. Postgraduate applicants who have difficulty in nominating a sponsor in Hong Kong may indicate on their visa applications that the University's Director of Admissions, Registration and Records is willing to act in this capacity.

ADMISSION ENQUIRIES

Students requiring copies of the undergraduate prospectus or postgraduate handbook, application forms, advice or assistance on application procedures, choice of programmes, entrance requirements or other related' matters are welcome to visit, telephone or write to the Admissions, Reaistration and Records Office (Room 1376).

which is open Mondays to Fridays from 9am to 12:30 pm and 2 pm to 5 pm, and

Saturdays from 9 am to 12 noon.

All enquiries should indicate the degree programme(s) of interest and be addressed to:

Director of Admissions, Registration and Records The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Clear Water Bay

Kowloon Hong Kong

Undergraduate Admissions With effect from 1 Jan 1995

Telephone No. : (852) 358 6622 (852) 2358 6622

Facsimile No. : (852) 358 0769 (852) 2358 0769

Postgraduate Admissions

Telephone No. : (852) 358 6646 (852) 2358 6646

Facsimile No. : (852) 358 2463 (852) 2358 2463

If that assessment indicates that the requirements may be met, the appropriate application forms will be sent to the prospective students to be returned to the Admissions, Registration and Records Office. At that point the formal selection process will begin. Certiiied true copies of all degrees, diplomas, certificates and other qualifications held should be submitted with the application form. Applicants accepted for admission will be required to produce the original documents on arrival at the University.

Overseas students should carefully consider the financial aspects of their studies in Honq Kong before applying for admission. In 1995-96, tuition fees (except for MBA progra~me)-will amount to $31,030 per annum and accommodation in on-campus undergraduate and postgraduate halls will involve approximately $6,500 and $1 0,300

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FEES, SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

This section deals with tuition and other fees, and financial assistance available for students.

Fees for 1994-95 Academic Year

There are a variety of fees as described below. Except for caution money, fees are not refundable.

1. The tuition fee for undergraduate students is $24,000 perannum. The fee is paid

in two equal instalments before the beginning of each semester.

2. The tuition fee for Dostaraduate students lexcettt for those in the MBA pro- gramme) is $24,00dper annum for full-time studeks and $1 2,000 per annum for part-time students. The fee is paid in two equal instalments before the beginning of each semester.

3. The fee structure for full-time and part-time MBA students is described in the

School of Business and Management section of the Academic Calendar.

4. In addion, each new student is required to pay a deposit of $300 as caution

money on first registration. Charges will be made against this deposit if there are any unpaid claims against the student, such as outstanding library dues. The balance will be transferred towards the graduation fee, or refunded if the student leaves the Universrty before graduation.

5. Students ioining the Students' Union are required to pay an initial entry fee and thereafteian annual subscription. These fees are set bythe Union andcollected bv the Universitv on behalf of the Union. The entw fee, applicable to students abmitted for the-first time, is $100 and the annual &bscriptibn is $100.

6. Students may be required to pay late charges for failure to complete certain

University procedures by stipulated deadlines. These include delays in paying tuition f&s and completing registration procedures, overdue library books, etc. Late charges are levied in accordance with the rules and regulations set by the respective offices.

7. The hall charges are $5,900 per person in double rooms in the undergraduate

halls. Students living in air-conditioned rooms are required to pay an air- conditioning fee of $400 plus the appropriate electricity charges. The hall charges are $9,350 per person in single air-conditioned rooms in the postgraduate halls. These charges cover residence for one residential year of 280 days from 3 September 1994 to 9 June 1995. Hall charges are paid in two instalments and do not include the cost of meals.

8. Other small fees and charges :

Transcript fee per copy' (excluding registration mail charges) $30

Re~la~ement of Student I/D Card $30

~ ~ p l i c a t i o n fee for retention of place (deferred entry) $200

Graduation fee $300

Late registration $100

Testimonial fee $10

A free copy will be issued to students upon graduation or withdrawal from the University

Fees, SchoZarsbiDs and Financial Assistance

Scholarships Scholarships and Prizes

The University administers a number of scholarships and prizes on behalf of individual and corporate donors. Most are awarded to students, without application, on the strenath of academic merit and the recommendations of a school or de~artment. Other sc601arships may have conditions specified by the donor. Further details are available at the Student Affairs Office.

Postgraduate Studentships

The University awards postgraduate studentships to selected full-time research postgraduate students who, consequently, engage in ancillary teaching andlor research duties. In 1994-95, these are at the rates of $10,000, $5,000 or $2,500 per month.

Financial Assistance

Government Student Financial Assistance

Full-time students who have the right of abode in Hong Kong or have resided or have had their home in Hong Kong continuously for three complete years immediately prior to the commencement of their programme of study are eligible to apply for financial aid to the Government Student Financial Assistance Agency. Assistance is offered in the form of grants andlor loans. Grants are given fortuition fee and academicexpenses; loans are approved for living expenses. Awards are means-tested so that the amount awarded is related to family disposable income. Students are expected to repay their loans at an interest rate of 2.5% per annum within a specified period after graduation or upon leaving the University.

Application forms and further details may be obtained from the Government Student Financial Assistance Agency at 9/F, National Mutual Centre, 151 Gloucester Road, Wanchai, Hong Kong, orfrom thestudent AffairsOfficeof the University. Students with financial difficulties are urged to apply for assistance under this scheme at the beginning of the academic year.

University Loans and Bursaries

Students with additional financial needs may apply for loans and bursaries administered by the University. In general, these funds are used to supplement, but not substitute for, Government financial assistance. Details of loans and bursaries are available at the Student Affairs Office.

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ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

Academic Reaulations

All students are responsible for their individual conduct and for adherence to the regulations.

A. TERMINOLOGY 1. Programme

A programme is an official degree programme recognised by UPGC (and JUPAS, as appropriate). Each programme is given a unique programme code; e.g. the Bachelor of Science programme in Chemistry bears the code E440.

2. Option

A programme 'nested" within an official degree programme which is handled within HKUST much as if it were a separate, free-standing degree programme, e.g. the Pure Mathematics option within the Bachelor of Science programme in Mathematics. If the option is administered by more than one department, it will be designated as a joint option. Currently, only the Mathematical Sciences Option within the Bachelor of Science programme in Mathematics is designated as a joint option. Regulations governing this joint option are described on page 24 of this Calendar.

3. Stream

A programme variation identified in the Calendar, sometimes as a University- approved requirement and sometimes as a departmental recommendation.

4. Concentration

A defined grouping of elective courses identified in the Calendar, sometimes as a University-approved requirement and sometimes as departmental recommendation.

5. Department

The term department is used in the Calendarto include all academic departments, the two divisions in the School of Humanities and Social Science, and any other academic units administering programmes.

6. Major Department

A student's major department is the academic unit which offers the specific pro- gramme in which the student is enrolled.

7. Course

A course is the basic unit of instruction at the University and is usually taught in either the Fall or Spring Semester. Courses are offered by all academic departments, the

two divisions in the School of Humanities and Social Science as well as the Language Centre. All courses are designated by a course code, title and vector; e.g. ClVL 271 Geotechnical Engineering [3-1-2:3].

8. Course Code

Each course is identified by acourse code which comprises afour-letter code followed by a three-digit number code. The letter code denotes either the area of study or course offering department. The 22 letter codes currently in use are:

ACCT Accounting BlCH Biochemistry BlOL Biology BTEC Biotechnology CENG Chemical Engineering CHEM Chemistry

ClVL Civil and Structural

Engineering COMP Computer Science ECON Economics

ELEC Electrical and Electronic Engineering

FlNA Finance

HUMA Humanities

INDE Industrial Engineering ISMT Information and Systems

Management LANG Language MARK Marketing MATH Mathematics MATL Materials Science and

Engineering

MECH Mechanical Engineering MGTO Management of Organisations PHYS Physics

SOSC Social Science

The last two digits of the number code represent a departmental coding series while the first digit indicates the course level:

0 = Introductory courses which are deqigned for undergraduate students

without an AL background in the subject area. A student admitted with an acceptable AL grade in the subject must replace such a course with an appropriate alternative.

1 = undergraduate year 1 courses

2 = Underaraduate year 2 courses

3 = undergraduate year 3 courses

5 = Postgraduate courses

6 = Postgraduate courses usually in the form of seminars, independent

studies, reading courses or master research

7 = Postgraduate courses usually in the form of doctoral seminars or re-

search

For example, ClVL 271 denotes that it is an undergraduate Year 2 course offered by the Department of Civil and Structural Engineering.

9. Course Vector and Credits

Eachcourse is assigned a course vector which indicates the number of instructional hours required and credits to be earned. It contains four numbers which stand for:

first numtier = lecture hours per week

second number = tutorial, seminar or recitation hours per week

third number = laboratory or field study hours per week

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Academic Re~ulations Academic Regulations

For example, a course vector of [3-1-2:3] denotes a course that requires 3 lecture hours, 1 tutorial/seminar/recitation hour, and 2 laboratory hours each week, and carries 3 credits.

The credii value of a course depends on the required scheduled hours of instruction. Normally, one credit is designated for one lecture hour, one seminar hour or three laboratory hours per week. However, sessions may be given less credii per hour if some scheduled hours such as tutorials reduce non-scheduled work by students.

B. GENERAL REGULATIONS

Regulations described in this section apply to all students. Specific regulations for undergraduate or postgraduate students are found in the respective sections.

10. Student Conduct

The University expects good conduct from all students. Rules and regulations are formulated and enforced to ensure the effective operation of the University, and the well-being of students and staff.

11. Academic Integrity and Discipline

Academic integrity is basic to the workof all students atthe University, and to scholarly and scientific work generally. Central to academic integrity is the presentation of one's own work as one's own, the acknowledgement of others' work, and the truthful reporting of results obtained. Students should acquaint themselves with the Univer- sity's policy on academic integrity and discipline.

11.1 Academic Dishonesty

There are a number of ways in which the tenets of academic integrity may be violated. The offences stated below are by no means exhaustive and the determination of academic dishonesty will be based on the broader context of the students' possible intent to mislead an instructor or the University as to their academic achievement, status, or qualifications. 'Studentsn as used here includes currently registered students as well as those who have graduated or left the University.

Plagiarism is defined as the presentation of work which actually originates from other

sources as one's own, for credit in a course or programme of study or towards the fulfilment of degree requirements. It includes the presentation in theses, examina- tions, tests, t e h papers, and other assignments, of someone else's work without attribution, includina the presentation of someone else's araument in one's own

words without acknowledgement.

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Cheating is defined as the unauthorised giving, receiving or utilising, or any attempt

to do so, of information or assistance during a test or examination. Also included are the unauthorised receipt or conveyance, orihe attempt to do so, of test or examination questions; giving or receiving assistance on an essay or assignment beyond what is approved by the instructor; impersonating someone else or causing or allowing oneself to be impersonated by someone else in writing or participating in a test or

examination; the submission of any academic work containing a purported statement of fact, or reference to a source, which has been concocted: ~resentina for credit in any courseor programmeof study, withoutthe permission of the instructchoncerned, academic work for which credit has previously been obtained or is being sought in another course or programme of study in the University or elsewhere; and any other conduct designed to provide a misleading basis for iudgement of the student's

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performance or academic standing.

11.2 Procedures in Case of Academic Dishonesty

If an instructor suspects that an act of academic dishonesty has been committed, he or she may choose, in the first instance, to discuss the matter privately with the student concerned toarrive informally at a mutually acceptable resolution. However, in cases when such agreement is not possible and in which the instructor has strong reasons to believe that a breach of academic integrity has occurred, the instructor may wish to begin a formal process of enquiry by calling a meeting with the student according to the procedures outlined below. If the offence relates to the activities of an academic department, division, centre or a similar unit, rather than a specific course, an appropriate member of the University staff arranges the meeting. In all cases, the student is informed of the purpose of the meeting in advance and the discussion is on record.

If, after the meeting, the instructor, or other appropriate individuals as noted, is satisfied that no academic dishonesty has been committed, no further action will be taken. The decision is conveyed to the student. If the student admits the alleged offence, the instructor may recommend an appropriate sanction and the student is informed accordingly. A report will be made to the student's major department. If, however, thestudent denies the charge, or disputes the sanction, or fails to attend the meeting, and the instructor decides that an act of academic dishonestv has been committed, the instructor forwards the case to the department head for fuhher action.

11.3 Sanctions

The following sanctions may be imposed, singly or in combination, and will be noted in the student's file: verbal or written warning or reprimand; a lower grade or failure on the assignment or test or examination, which may result in a lower course grade including failure in the course; a make-up assignment or test or examination; a reduction of the final grade or a failure in the course as a penalty exclusive of any reduced grade; withdrawal of eligibility for future scholarships and other academic awards; ineligibility for honours upon graduation; suspension from the University for a set period or indefinitely; cancellation of academic standing or academic credits obtained thus far; withholding or rescinding an HKUST degree; any other sanctions, as deemed appropriate for certain offences.

11.4 Student Rights and Obligations

Students have the right to be informed that an academic offence is suspected, to defend themselves against the charges and present evidence, and to meet with the authority imposing a sanction for this latter Purpose. Thev should be informed of the verdict,-the'sanczon, and the appeal pro.cedures and should also be advised to approach the Director of Student Affairs for advice and guidance.

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Academic Regulations Academic Regulations

An appeal may be made against either the verdict or the sanction(s) imposed. This must be made in writing within fourteen days of receiving thedecision and should state the grounds on which it is made. Normally, appeals will be considered only on the grounds of procedural irregularity or new evidence.

In some cases appeal decisions can be appealed against. At each stage, the student is informed if further appeal is possible and any conditions which may pertain.

12. Examination Guidelines for Students

12.1 Examinees will be asked to show their Student Identity Cards for verification purposes. Students who are unable to present their cards will not be allowed to write the examination.

12.2 Examinees are not allowed to bring into or remove from the examination room any printed or written matter save with the express permission of an examiner or invigilator. Unless expressedly permitted by the examiner, no books, paper, calcu- lators, or any information storage and retrieval device will be allowed.

12.3 Normally, no examinees will be allowed to enter the examination room later than thirty minutes after the start of the examination, and no examinees will be permitted to leave the examination room within the first thirty minutes of the examination. An invigilator or examiner may waive this time limit under special circumstances, such as sickness. Late comers will not be given any extra time for the examination.

12.4 Examinees who are taken ill during the examination and have to leave the examination room are advised to proceed immediately to the Student Health Services on campus, if possible, or seek other appropriate medical assistance as soon as possible.

12.5 Examinees should only write on their answer books or on any supplementaly answer books and sheets provided for the purpose and shall surrender all such materials in good order on leaving the examination room. Answers should be written on the right hand page only, with the left hand page used for rough work. The examiners may read only the right hand page material.

12.6 No conversation will be allowed during the examination and any questions must be addressed to an invigilator. Any irregularity of conduct in the examination room will be reported. Examinees causing disturbance in the examination room will be expelled from the examination room and may face disciplinary action.

12.7 Examinees must hand in their answer books on leaving the examination room. However, examinees may not be allowed to leave the exadnation room during the last fifteen minutes of the examination and must remain seated until all the examina- tion answer books have been collected by an invigilator.

12.8 Examinees who fail to attend a scheduled examination without prior approval of the department offering the course will result in automatic course failure. A D D ~ ~ ~ s for special consideration-on the grounds of special circumstances such as medical reasons are described under Item 15 on page 23 of this Calendar.

12.9 In the event of cancellation of examinations as a result of Storm Warning Signal No. 8 or above being hoisted or Rainstorm Black Warning being issued, arrangements

will be made for the examinations affected to be held as soon as practicable after the original examination period and candidates will be notified accordingly through public announcements, etc.

13. Intellectual Property Rights

The University has established policies defining the characteristics, development, procedures, responsibilities, and ownership of intellectual property for students, faculty and staff. The policies are organised into four different areas of interests: Copyright, Patents, Software, and Trade and Service Marks. A booklet dealing with each area is available from the Office of Contract and Grant Administration. As part of university policy, all students, faculty and staff are required to agree to and abide by these policies as a condition of admission or employment. The University may make changes to these policies from time to time.

14. Use of Human or Animal Subjects

There are complex legal, regulatory and operational standards applicable to the care and use of human and animal "subjects" in educational, research and service programmes. The term "subject" means that the person or animal is subjected to some planned activity for the purpose of effecting response or developing new scientific understanding. Comprehensive policies are currently under development.

15. Variance from Regulation

In general, request for a variance to the academic regulation should be made in the first instance to the student's major department. Any subsequent appeal against a departmental decision must be made within two weeks of receiving notice of the decision. Such an appeal should be well documented and addressed to the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled. The dean's decision is final.

C. REGULATIONS GOVERNING UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

16. Undergraduate Programmes

Undergraduate programmes are full-time three-year honours degree programmes which comprise a structured set of courses that must be satisfactorily completed in order to satisfy degree requirements. In addition to courses in the field of major study and related areas, all programmes require courses from other schools. Credits are earned semester-by-semester towards the completion of degree requirements. Each credit carries equal weight, independent of the specific course or year of study. A minimum number of credits is required in each programme in the range of 100 to 105. Individual student programmes may exceed these minima owing to the choice of electives with higher-than-required credit value or enrolment in additional courses not required in the programme.

Registration in a programme is in two parts : programme registration and course registration. All students are required to complete both registration procedures in each semester.

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Academic Regulations

17. Programme Registration

Programme registration involves payment of tuition and other prescribed fees where appropriate and confirms students' enrolment at the University. It also allows for application for hall residence and financial aid, as well as the acquisition of information about student life and the University.

Each student enrolled in a specific programme is subject to the requirements of the

major department and the University. Exemption from s~ecific reauirements are

possible, but only in well justified circumstances and with written perm'ission from the major department.

Failure to enrol in the programme in any one semester will result in automatic withdrawal from the programme and the University, unlessaformal Leave from Study has been obtained. Leave from Study is possible only on application to and with the approval of the student's major department.

17.1 Study Commitment

Students admitted are expected to study full-time fortheir degrees, and are cautioned that outside work commitments may impede their academic performance.

17.2 Double Registration

Unless prior permission from the Director of Admissions, Registration and Records is obtained, students are not permitted to concurrently register for another programme at this University or at another post-secondary institution. Student enrolment lists are compared with those of other post-secondary institutionsfrom time to time. If students are found to be registered elsewhere, they will normally be required to discontinue their studies at this University.

17.3 Length of Study

Each programme normally requires six semesters of full-time study, spreading over three years. Permitted Leaves from Study will not count towards the limits on registration. Special permission, on the recommendation of the major department, is required from the dean of the student's school to extend a programme bevond six semesters. Appeal against the dean's decision should be acldr&sed to the -mice of the Pro-Vice-chancellor for Academic Affairs. Reaistration is normallv not oossible

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, beyond an eighth semester.

Students permitted to study beyond a sixth semesterwill register as full-time students, pay full fees, be subject to all University regulations, and be entitled to all normal student sewices. However, student housing will not be available to such students unless special permission has been obtained from the Director of Student Affairs.

17.4 Joint Option (only for students in the Department of Mathematics)

Students designated as pursuing a joint option require the approval of their admission to the option by the departments or schools jointly offering the option. They have the

Academic Regulations

same priority of access to the courses specified in their option as do majors in those departments. Presently only the Mathematical Sciences Option within the Bachelor of Science programme in Mathematics is designated as a joint option.

Other Mathematics students may wish to follow the curriculum of this joint option but have access to courses outside their major departments only after major and joint option students have been accommodated. Their access cannot be assured. All students completing joint option requirements will be considered for the degree designation of that programme, whether or not they were so designated previously. The class of honours, however, must be agreeable to both departments and their schools. Otherwise, the degree will be awarded in the Department of Mathematics only.

18. Course Registration

Course registration deals with the selection of and enrolment in appropriate courses for a specific semester. Students should acquaint themselves with the general rules for undergraduate course registration and the departmental course requirements for the degree programme(s). Students should also read the course description and requirements carefully before selecting a course. Student course registration for a semester requires approval from their major department, without which, the student's programme registration will be revoked.

18.1 General rules for undergraduate course registration

a. Credit Requirements

In general, students are required to take at least twelve credits from the School of Humanities and Social Science, of which at least one course in Humanities and one in Social Science are reauired: at least six credits from each of the two other schools otherthan the student's school'; a total of at least thirty-six credits outside the student's major department; and the remaining credits within the student's major department.

b. Course Designations

Courses specified in the undergraduate programmes are designated as either Core (C), Required (R) or Elective (E). Core courses must be taken in the semester indicated or, with departmental approval, earlier, Students who fail to register in and obtain a passing grade in a core course will be placed in poor academic standing. In certain circumstances and with the permission of the major department, courses designated as required may be taken at other times. Elective courses are selected by the student in the areas designated in the curriculum subject to departmental approval, and options exist as to when they may be taken. Some courses may not be allowed for elective credit. When a specific course is not identified, the course vector shown defines the credit required. Variance from this credit value is possible when choosing a specific elective in a semester; however, students should ensure that appropriate adjustments are made subsequently to align with the credit required. Students who complete a particular course in a semester earlier than shown may substitute with another course or take a reduced course load. Unless stated otherwise, courses replacing specified ones will have the same course designation as given to the course being replaced.

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Academic Regulations

c. Prerequisites, Corequisites, Exclusions and Background

If a course has designated other courses as its prerequisites, students must have taken and passed the prerequisites before they may register in the course, unless exemption is granted by the department offering the course.

For a course with corequisite designated, both must be taken concurrently. If a course has exclusions specified, students are not allowed to register in the course if they have already taken and passed any of the stated exclusions. Also students are not allowed to enrol in a course together with any of its stated exclusions in the same semester.

A course may require a certain general level of desired prior knowledge as the background. Students should ensure that they have the necessary background to undertake a course, and may seek the help from their departmental advisors.

d. Course Repeats

A failed core or required course must be repeated, and a given course may only be repeated once. Students may not repeat a passed course for upgrading purpose. A failed course (grade F) shall not be credited towards a degree, although it will be reflected in the student's record. The new grade obtained after repeating a course will replace the previous F grade in the calculation of the cumulative and graduation grade averages.

e. Course Auditor

With the permission of the course instructor, a full-time student may register in a course as an auditor. Subject to satisfactory completion of requirements set at registration by the instructor, the course will be designated AU on the student's transcript. Otherwise the course will be removed from the registration record. No course credit is given for audited courses.

18.2 Departmental Course Requirements

Details of the various undergraduate programmes are presented in the departmental entries in this Calendar. All programmes have a minimum requirement ranging from 100 to 105 credits. A student's choice of electives mav result in this minimum beina exceeded. The programme requirements are presented in a semester-by-semest& format which students are ex~ected to follow. Students should note that all courses - - - - - selected, including electives, require departmental approval. Explanations of core (C), required (R), and elective (E) courses can be found on page 25.

Students who are admitted in the 1994-95 academic vear are reauired to follow the curriculum as described in this calendar throughout their three years of study unless the University advises them of any subsequent approved modifications.

Students who are admitted prior to the 1994-95 academic year should refer to the curriculum guide for their year of entry, which is available from the Admissions, Registration and Records Office.

Academic Regulations

18.3 Deviations from Curriculum

Students wishing to depart from the specified semester programme should consult and obtain approval from the major department during the course registration period. In particular, they should ensure that (i) the departure will not prevent them from enrolling in core and required courses in subsequent semesters; (ii) the semester study load is manageable; and (iii) the length of study for the programme will not exceed six semesters. Under exceptional circumstances, the major department may consider and approve requests from individual students to deviate from the specified curriculum.

18.4 Course Registration Changes

a. Course addldrop

Students may make further changes to their course enrolment after the course registration during the "add-drop" period which is scheduled at the beginning of each semester. Changes made in this period will not be reflected in the student's record.

b. Course withdrawal

A student who wishes to withdraw from a course after the "add-drop" period may do so up to six weeks before the commencement of the examination period. Withdrawal beyond the six-week deadline will not be accepted. Students are cautioned that late withdrawal may affect their academic progress and result in less than the specified credits being earned in the semester. Such withdrawal is entirely the responsibility of the student, who should seek advice from the major department. The Withdrawal without Penalty (W) grade will be recorded as the course grade.

19. Course Exemption

Course exemption may be granted if the student can produce evidence, such as a transcript andcourse syllab<s, that acourse is equivalent in content to another course taken elsewhere. for which a satisfactorv arade has been obtained. No credits will be given for the exempted course, and the stidGnt must take an approved alternative course.

20. Advanced Standing

Advanced standing may be granted to students on recognition of studies completed successfully elsewhere. Application should be made to their major department during their first semester after admission. Late application will normally not be considered. The amount of advanced credits to be granted will be determined by the major department on review of past academic records and the level of equivalence to HKUST courses required, and within the following guidelines:

(a) a minimum of one year full-time study at HKUST is required before the student is considered for award of the degree; and

(b) a minimum of 35 HKUST credits are required for graduation.

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