• To introduce the use of the LPF as a tool for planning the school English Language curriculum

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Developing Secondary Students’

Writing and Speaking Skills with Reference to the Learning Progression Framework (Refreshed)

English Language Education Section Curriculum Development Institute Education Bureau July 2022

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Course Objectives

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• To introduce the Learning Progression Framework (LPF) for English Language with the focuses on writing and speaking skills;

• To introduce the use of the LPF as a tool for planning the school English Language curriculum

• To provide suggestions on effective strategies that

incorporate the use of the LPF to facilitate the development

of writing and speaking skills and assessment for/as

learning

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Whole‐person Development Values Education and Life  Planning Education

Creating Space and Catering  for Learner Diversity

Applied Learning

University Admissions

STEM Education Final Report of Task Force on

Review of School Curriculum (2020)

Six Directions of

Recommendations

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Final Report of Task Force on

Review of School Curriculum (2020)

Catering for  Learner  Diversity

Creating  Space

Recommendations  for English Language

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Final Report of Task Force on

Review of School Curriculum (2020)

Recommendations for English Language

further streamline the SBA and review how  the Elective Part could be better assessed in  the Writing Paper of the HKDSE

offer vocational English as an  Applied Learning (ApL) course

enrich the existing curriculum, with  more emphasis on the  academic and  creative use of the language

provide more opportunities for students  to enhance their language competency  through LaC and RaC

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Examples to be Used in Today’s Seminar

Creative use of English

Promotion of LaC

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The Learning Progression Framework (LPF) for English Language

http://www.edb.gov.hk/lpfenglish

Reading

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Curriculum Framework,

Learning, Teaching and Assessment, and the LPF

Curriculum Framework

(What students are expected to learn)

Goals

(What students can do as a result)

Learning Progression Framework

Attainment Process

Teaching

Assessment Learning

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Curriculum Framework and Assessment

Curriculum Framework and the LPF

Skills

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What students can do as a result of learning and teaching

Assessments in   Schools

HKDSE

Assessments for  Basic Competency

TSA

Assessment for/as Learning Curriculum Framework and 

Learning Progression Framework

Basic 

Competency

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What is the LPF for English Language?

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represents the growth of learners on a developmental continuum as they work towards the Learning Targets and Learning Objectives of the English Language curriculum;

is made up of Learning Outcomes organised under the four language skills and divided into eight levels of attainment;

helps teachers better understand and articulate learners’ performance; and

helps teachers plan strategically how to enhance English Language learning and teaching.

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12 Attainment

Milestones (ATMs)

Learning Outcomes

Underlying Principles

Structure of the LPF

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Pointers

Structure of the LPF

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Structure of the LPF

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Teaching

Assessment Learning

How could the LPF be used?

Learning outcomes Content

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To provide reference for understanding  students’ learning progress

To plan and review

To help students progress along the  learning continuum

Summative assessment / Benchmarking  students

What are the Purposes of Developing the LPF?

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Understanding the Learning Progression

In groups,

• study the Outcome Statements for three levels of the LPF for Writing; and

• identify the three aspects in the progression of the Outcome Statements for Writing.

Activity 1 (Matching activity)

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Understanding the Learning Progression

Activity 1 (Matching activity)

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Content

Organisation

Language and Style

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The LPF for English Language (Writing)

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Progression of the Learning Outcomes

Activity 1 (Matching activity)

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Writing texts to convey

information, ideas, personal experiences

and opinions on familiar and less familiar topics with elaboration Writing short

texts to convey simple but

limited

information, ideas and personal

experiences on familiar topics

Writing short texts to convey simple

information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar topics with some

elaboration Content

ATM 2

ATM 4 ATM 7

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Content

Progression of the Learning Outcomes

Complexity of  information 

and ideas 

Length of texts Familiarity 

with topics

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The LPF for English Language (Writing)

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Progression of the Learning Outcomes

Activity 1 (Matching activity)

Organisation

Linking ideas coherently

throughout the text, and

showing appropriate overall

organisation of ideas

Putting ideas about a topic in sentences

Linking ideas quite

coherently in a short text, and showing an awareness of overall

organisation of ideas

ATM 2

ATM 4

ATM 7

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Progression of the Learning Outcomes

Linkage between  ideas within and  across paragraphs

Overall 

organisation of  ideas

Organisation

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The LPF for English Language (Writing)

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Progression of the Learning Outcomes

Activity 1 (Matching activity)

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Language and Style

Using a wide range of

generally

appropriate and accurate

language forms and functions, and generally appropriate tone, style, register and features of a range of text

types Using some

simple

language forms and functions, and simple formats quite appropriately

Using a small range of quite appropriate and accurate

language forms and functions, and showing an awareness of tone, style, register and features of

some text types ATM 2

ATM 4

ATM 7

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Progression of the Learning Outcomes

Language forms and  functions used at 

different levels of writing

Language and Style

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Curriculum Planning

The learning, teaching & assessment cycle

Providing a common 

“language” and “tool” to 

facilitate professional 

discussions among 

teachers

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Senior Secondary

An example

Curriculum Planning

Primary 

Ensuring that the range of tasks provided in the school writing programme covers a variety of purposes and text types

Content (ATMs 4‐6) Organisation (ATMs 4‐6) Language & Style (ATMs 3‐5)

Developing students’ writing skills and strategies across levels

Junior Secondary

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Junior Secondary

• Learning topics with contexts related to their everyday life and some formal situations

• Reading & writing texts with some degree of complexity

• Understanding, interpreting

& analysing different texts

• …

Senior Secondary

• Learning topics with contexts related to their everyday life and formal situations

• Reading & writing complex texts

• Understanding,

interpreting, analysing &

evaluating a variety of texts

• … Primary

• Learning topics with contexts related to their daily experience

• Reading & writing simple texts

• Understanding &

constructing meaning from texts

• …

Curriculum Planning

Formality

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Curriculum Expectations in Literacy Development (English Language)

/ Text complexity / Thinking skills

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To enrich the language environment

To increase students’

opportunities to use English

Whole-school Language Policy

The Fine-tuned MOI Arrangements

English Extended Learning Activities (ELA) EMI by subject(s)

EMI by class(es)

EMI for all subjects 32

Language Content

Academic content awareness

+

Academic language awareness

Speaking Writing

Language across the Curriculum Listening Reading

Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Optimising English Language

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Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Context Integrated Science

Rhetorical function To compare/contrast Related language items Both, Like / Unlike, But

Writing across the Curriculum

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Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Context History

Rhetorical function To compare/contrast

Related language items but, bigger (comparative adjective),  however, while

Writing across the Curriculum

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Senior Secondary

An example

Curriculum Planning

Primary 

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Junior Secondary

Providing opportunities to support students in Writing across the Curriculum

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Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

36 Writing – ATM 4 Writing – ATM 5 Writing – ATM 6 Writing – ATM 7 Writing – ATM 8

Content Writing short texts to

convey simple information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar topics with some elaboration

Writing texts to convey simple information, ideas, personal

experiences and opinions on familiar topics with some elaboration

Writing texts to convey information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar topics with elaboration

Writing texts to convey information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar and less familiar topics with elaboration

Writing texts to convey information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar and less familiar topics with substantial elaboration Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write and reply to simple letters to share personal experiences

write simple descriptions of objects, people, places and events with some details

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write some formal letters to make simple requests and enquiries

write a range of simple texts to describe, recount, record, explain and propose with some supporting details

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write some formal letters to make requests and applications with supporting details

write a range of texts to describe, recount, record, explain, propose and summarise with supporting details

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write formal letters for a range of purposes quite effectively

write a range of texts to describe, recount, record, explain, propose, summarise, review, compare and contrast with

supporting details quite effectively

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write formal letters for a range of purposes effectively

write a range of texts for various purposes with supporting details effectively

Increase in formality

Writing for

different purposes

The

learning &

teaching of rhetorical functions

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Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Examples of Rhetorical Functions and their Related Language Items Commonly Found across KLAs

CDC Supplement to the English Language

Education Key Learning Area Curriculum Guide (Secondary 1 — 3) 2018 Chapter 6

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Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Integrating Writing across the Curriculum in the  English Language Curriculum

Writing objectives

ATM 7.2

– write a range of texts to  describe, recount, record,  explain, propose, summarise,  review, compare and contrast  with supporting details quite  effectively

Writing – ATM 6 Writing – ATM 7 Writing – ATM 8 Content

Writing texts to convey information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar topics with elaboration

Writing texts to convey information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar and less familiar topics with elaboration

Writing texts to convey information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar and less familiar topics with substantial elaboration Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write some formal letters to make requests and applications with supporting details

write a range of texts to describe, recount, record, explain, propose and summarise with supporting details

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write formal letters for a range of purposes quite effectively

write a range of texts to describe, recount, record, explain, propose, summarise, review, compare and contrast with

supporting details quite effectively

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write formal letters for a range of purposes effectively

write a range of texts for various purposes with supporting details effectively

An example

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Chinese or Western Parenting: Which is Best for You?

…Ms Chua was both too strict with her children and too critical of western parenting methods…

…Instead, they said that “good parents make sure their children get top grades”…

…Other studies show that, compared to western parents, Chinese parents spend 10 times longer every day doing homework and other academic activities with their children…

…Chinese parents, however, believe that they know best for their children, and therefore make their choices of activities and courses of study for them…Chinese parents, on the other hand, believe that their children can…

Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Source: ELE KLA CG 2017 (Example 2) http://www.edb.gov.hk/eleklacgexamples

Activity 2

Study the excerpt from a text below. Can you identify some learning focuses to support students in learning across the curriculum?

(You may type your ideas in the chat box.)

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Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Integrating Writing across the Curriculum in the English Language Curriculum, e.g.

Making use of a graphic organiser (i.e. a Venn diagram) to deconstruct

 the main ideas of the reading text; and

 the rhetorical function “to compare/contrast”.

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Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

• the main ideas of the  reading text

To compare:

• the similarities between  Chinese and western parents

• the differences between  Chinese and western parents Making use of a graphic organiser (i.e. a Venn diagram) to deconstruct

 the main ideas of the reading text; and

Focussing on Content

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Chinese or Western Parenting: Which is Best for You?

…Ms Chua was both too strict with her children and too critical of western parenting methods…

…Instead, they said that “good parents make sure their children get top grades”…

…Other studies show that, compared to western parents, Chinese parents spend 10 times longer every day doing homework and other academic activities with their children…

…Chinese parents, however, believe that they know best for their children, and therefore make their choices of activities and courses of study for them…Chinese parents, on the other hand, believe that their children can…

Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

 the related language items, e.g. “both”, “compared to”, “more/- er…than”, “however / but”, “on the other hand”

Source: ELE KLA CG 2017 (Example 2) http://www.edb.gov.hk/eleklacgexamples

Drawing students’ attention to

 the communicative / rhetorical function, i.e. “to compare/contrast”

Focussing on Language

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Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Guiding students to plan for their

writing task using a Venn diagram Apply the language items to compare the different views and behaviour between Amy’s parents and the students’

parents in the writing task

Integrating Writing across the Curriculum in the English Language Curriculum, e.g.

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Secondary 2 English Language History Science

R e a d i n g

Learning and teaching strategies Rhetorical functions Language items

Teaching focus Topic

W r

i t i n g

Providing relevant contexts for the application of the target language items (e.g.)

Use of visual representation (e.g. a Venn diagram) to help students deconstruct the text To compare/contrast

Showing similarities Both, like, similarly

Showing differences

Unlike, while, however/but, instead of Introducing the forms and functions

of the target language items

Reinforcing the use of the target language items Cultures of the World Industrial Revolution Respiration

“Unlike western parents, Hong Kong parents tend to focus much on their children’s academic performance…”

“Water power was a

source of energy before the Industrial Revolution, while the steam engine has become an important source of energy after the Revolution…”

“Like respiration, burning also produces heat energy…”

Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

Curriculum Mapping

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Curriculum Planning

Enhancing the interface across key stages

More examples

(Junior Secondary Level) (Senior Secondary Level)

https://www.edb.gov.hk/RWaC_JS https://www.edb.gov.hk/Academic_English

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Learning, Teaching and Assessment

(1) Identifying students’ 

strengths & areas for  improvement & setting 

writing objectives

(2) Setting task‐specific  assessment criteria and  designing writing activities 

to help students achieve  the assessment criteria

Adopting a Process Approach

(3) Providing effective  feedback to guide students to 

make improvement to their  writing drafts

(47)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

(1) Identifying students’ 

strengths & areas for  improvement & setting 

writing objectives

(2) Setting task‐specific  assessment criteria and  designing writing activities 

to help students achieve  the assessment criteria

Adopting a Process Approach

(3) Providing effective  feedback to guide students to 

make improvement to their  writing drafts

(48)

Writing – ATM 4 Writing – ATM 5 Writing – ATM 6 Content

Writing short texts to convey simple

information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar topics with some elaboration

Writing texts to convey simple information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar topics with some elaboration

Writing texts to convey information, ideas, personal experiences and opinions on familiar topics with elaboration

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write and reply to simple letters to share personal experiences

write simple descriptions of objects, people, places and events with some details

write simple stories

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write some formal letters to make simple requests and enquiries

write a range of simple texts to describe, recount, record, explain and propose with some supporting details

write stories with a setting, a simple plot and simple

characterisation

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

write some formal letters to make requests and applications with supporting details

write a range of texts to describe, recount, record, explain, propose and summarise with supporting details

write stories with a clear setting, and some

development of plot and characters

(1) Identifying students’ strengths & areas for improvement & setting writing objectives

Identifying Students’

Strengths &

Areas for Improvement

?

An example

、 

 

 、

 、

 、

?

Identifying writing

skills and strategies that

need to be supported

need to be further stretched

need to be given opportunities for development

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

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(49)

Writing – ATM 4 Writing – ATM 5 Writing – ATM 6 Organisation

Linking ideas quite coherently in a short text, and showing an

awareness of overall organisation of ideas

Linking ideas quite coherently in some parts of a text, and showing some overall organisation of ideas

Linking ideas quite coherently throughout the text, and showing appropriate overall organisation of ideas

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

establish links using a small range of cohesive devices with some consistency

arrange ideas in a short text using simple means (e.g.

providing illustrations or explanations) to show a generally clear focus

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

establish links within some paragraphs using a range of cohesive devices with some consistency

arrange ideas in some paragraphs using different means (e.g.

using topic sentences, providing

justification,

providing resolutions to problems in stories) to show a generally clear focus

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

establish links within and across paragraphs using a range of cohesive devices with some consistency

arrange ideas within and across paragraphs using different means (e.g. summarising, creating climax in stories) to show a generally clear focus

Identifying Students’

Strengths &

Areas for Improvement

?

An example

、  

  、  、

?

Identifying writing

skills and strategies that

need to be supported

need to be further stretched

need to be given opportunities for development

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

49

(1) Identifying students’ strengths & areas for improvement & setting writing objectives

(50)

Writing – ATM 3 Writing – ATM 4 Writing – ATM 5 Language and style

Using simple language forms and functions, and simple formats quite appropriately and accurately

Using a small range of quite appropriate and accurate language forms and functions, and showing an awareness of tone, style, register and features of some text types

Using a range of quite appropriate and accurate language forms and functions, and quite appropriate tone, style, register and features of some text types

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

use a small range of simple vocabulary on familiar topics, with some accuracy in spelling and word collocation

use simple present, simple past (mainly familiar verb forms), present continuous and future tenses with some consistency

use appropriate salutation and closing in simple letters

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

• use a range of adjectives/

adjective phrases to describe and compare with some consistency

• use a small range of tenses with some consistency

• show an awareness of using some stylistic features (e.g.

use dialogues in stories to create interest) to support the purpose of text

Pointers

Learners can, for example,

use a range of vocabulary on familiar topics, with most words correctly spelt and some word collocations correct

use a range of tenses and the passive voice with some consistency

use some stylistic features (e.g. use headings and sub- headings to clarify

presentation) to support the purpose of text with some consistency

Identifying Students’

Strengths &

Areas for Improvement

?

An example

、 

  、

?

Identifying writing

skills and strategies that

need to be supported need to be further stretched

need to be given

opportunities for development

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

50

 、 

 、

(1) Identifying students’ strengths & areas for improvement & setting writing objectives

(51)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

(1) Identifying students’ 

strengths & areas for  improvement & setting 

writing objectives

(2) Setting task‐specific  assessment criteria and  designing writing activities 

to help students achieve  the assessment criteria

Adopting a Process Approach

(3) Providing effective  feedback to guide students to 

make improvement to their  writing drafts

(52)

Learning and Teaching

Activity 3F (Pre-writing)

A Character Map

52

Think about the main characters and the key events of the rhyme “Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf” and record your ideas in the plot diagram.

ATM 5.3

write stories with a setting, a simple plot

and simple characterisation

Content

Drawing students’ attention to the characterisation

framework

(2) Setting task‐specific assessment criteria and designing writing activities to

help students achieve the assessment criteria

(53)

Learning and Teaching

Activity 3F (Pre-writing)

A Character Map

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• wearing a red cape with a red hood (at the beginning)

• a furry creature with big eyes, big ears, a big nose and big, sharp teeth

• wearing a wolfskin coat and carrying a pistol (near the end)

• dressed in her cap, not feeling well

• tough, powerful, smart

• terrified, crying out loud

• hungry, cunning, greedy What does 

the  character  look like?

How does  the  character 

act?

What  happened 

to the  character?

• visited her grandma;

• shot the wolf dead

• ate grandma;

• pretended to be grandma;

• shot dead by Little Red Riding Hood

• eaten by the wolf Think about the main characters and the key events of the rhyme “Little Red

Riding Hood and the Wolf” and record your ideas in the plot diagram.

ATM 5.3

write stories with a setting, a simple plot

and simple characterisation

Content

(2) Setting task‐specific assessment criteria and designing writing activities to

help students achieve the assessment criteria

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He quickly put on Grandma's clothes, He dressed himself in coat and hat.

He put on shoes, and after that, He even brushed and curled his hair,

Then sat himself in Grandma's chair.

In came the little girl in red.

She stopped. She stared. And then she said,

"What great big ears you have, Grandma."

"All the better to hear you with," the Wolf replied.

"What great big eyes you have, Grandma."

said Little Red Riding Hood.

"All the better to see you with,” the Wolf replied.

He sat there watching her and smiled.

He thought, I'm going to eat this child.

He quickly put on ______________,

He dressed himself in ______________.

He put on shoes, and after that, He even _______________________, Then sat himself in __________________.

In came _____________________.

She stopped. She stared. And then she said,

"What ______________ you have, Wolfie."

"All the better to ____________," the wolf replied.

"What ______________you have, Wolfie."

said _______________.

"All the better to ___________,” the wolf replied.

He sat there watching her and smiled.

He thought, I'm going to _______________.

Finally, Wolfie decided to declare his love to his dream girl, _____________. Hoping to draw her attention…

( ) and the Wolf

...

Winnie Winnie

Winnie

hip-hop clothes jeans and hat

big strong arms hug you with charming lips

kiss you with

ask her out wears his brother’s top

coffee shop his dream girlfriend in red

Activity 4 (While-writing)

Rewrite a specific part of the rhyme “Little Red Riding Hood & the Wolf” with creativity. Fill in the blanks using your knowledge about rhyme if possible.

Learning and Teaching

Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf ...

(2) Setting task‐specific assessment criteria and designing writing activities to

help students achieve the assessment criteria

(55)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

(1) Identifying students’ 

strengths & areas for  improvement & setting 

writing objectives

(2) Setting task‐specific  assessment criteria and  designing writing activities 

to help students achieve  the assessment criteria

Adopting a Process Approach

(3) Providing effective  feedback to guide students to 

make improvement to their  writing drafts

(56)

Adapted from : Ontario. Ministry of Education. (2010). Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools. Toronto: Author. [p.32]

Promoting Assessment for / as Learning

• Equipping students with the skills and 

strategies through targeted instruction and  guidance

• Providing quality feedback that helps  students progress further

• Engaging students in self‐reflection & letting  them keep track of their own learning

Where are the students going?

• Identifying learning goals and assessment criteria

• Using examples & models of strong & weak work

Where are the students now?

Goal What do the students need to do in order to get there?

• Understanding students’ learning performance through a variety of assessment activities, e.g. self-, peer-, teacher assessment

Adapted from: Chappius, J. (2009). Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning. Canada: Pearson Education.

56

Assessment

(3) Providing effective feedback to guide students to make improvement to their writing drafts

(57)

Promoting Assessment for / as Learning

• Equipping students with the skills and 

strategies through targeted instruction and  guidance

• Providing quality feedback that helps  students progress further

• Engaging students in self‐reflection & letting  them keep track of their own learning

Where are the students going?

• Identifying learning goals and assessment criteria

• Using examples & models of strong & weak work

Where are the students now?

Goal What do the students need to do in order to get there?

• Understanding students’ learning performance through a variety of assessment activities, e.g. self-, peer-, teacher assessment

Adapted from: Chappius, J. (2009). Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning. Canada: Pearson Education.

57

Assessment

(3) Providing effective feedback to guide students to make improvement to their writing drafts

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Identifying learning objectives / goals and assessment criteria

with reference to the LPF

Assessment

(3) Providing effective feedback to guide students to make improvement to their writing drafts

Where are the students now?

Developing Task-specific Assessment Forms

Understanding students’ writing performance through a variety of assessment activities (e.g.

self-, peer-, teacher assessment)

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Assessment

(3) Providing effective feedback to guide students to make improvement to their writing drafts

Where are the students going?

An Example

Writing an Imaginative Story

• Understanding students’ performance  in their 1st drafts

• Collecting data from students’ self‐

/peer‐assessment forms

• Teaching the learning strategies to  help students write with supporting  details

Collecting Assessment Data

Process Writing

• Adjusting the learning goal / objective  for the 2nddraft, i.e. writing with 

supporting details

(60)

Adapted from : Ontario. Ministry of Education. (2010). Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools. Toronto: Author. [p.32]

Promoting Assessment for / as Learning

• Equipping students with the skills and 

strategies through targeted instruction and  guidance

• Providing quality feedback that helps  students progress further

• Engaging students in self‐reflection & letting  them keep track of their own learning

Where are the students going?

• Identifying learning goals and assessment criteria

• Using examples & models of strong & weak work

Where are the students now?

Goal What do the students need to do in order to get there?

• Understanding students’ learning performance through a variety of assessment activities, e.g. self-, peer-, teacher assessment

Adapted from: Chappius, J. (2009). Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning. Canada: Pearson Education.

60

Assessment

(3) Providing effective feedback to guide students to make improvement to their writing drafts

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Assessment

(3) Providing effective feedback to guide students to make improvement to their writing drafts

Where are the students going?

Providing reference points for the assessment criteria using models of good work 

Teachers’ Role

One afternoon, my best friend, Jane, and I left school and saw this catchy poster “Coca Cola! Buy one get one free!” outside the nearby fast food shop. Jane and I decided to try it together. Jane wondered,

“It smelt like medicine!” “Oh, it’s the new taste, cherry coke!”

explained the shopkeeper. We had a funny feeling. The drink was dancing inside our stomach! Our adventure started after we had finished the drink which I never thought I would try!

An Invisible Adventure with my Friend

52

using adjectives

1

using relative clauses (who / which / that)

2

using figurative language (e.g. simile, metaphor, personification)

3

using prepositional phrase

4

(62)

Adapted from : Ontario. Ministry of Education. (2010). Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools. Toronto: Author. [p.32]

Promoting Assessment for / as Learning

• Equipping students with the skills and 

strategies through targeted instruction and  guidance

• Providing quality feedback that helps  students progress further

• Engaging students in self‐reflection & letting  them keep track of their own learning

Where are the students going?

Where are the students now?

Goal What do the students need to do in order to get there?

• Understanding students’ learning performance through a variety of assessment activities, e.g. self-, peer-, teacher assessment

Adapted from: Chappius, J. (2009). Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning. Canada: Pearson Education.

62

Assessment

(3) Providing effective feedback to guide students to make improvement to their writing drafts

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Assessment

(3) Providing effective feedback to guide students to make improvement to their writing drafts

It was a school day. I paid attention in the lessons as I always did. At recess time, I went to the tuck shop and bought myself some snacks as usual. However, something happened. My classmate, Jacky, whispered in my ears, “You don’t have to buy snacks today, you can have this!” I opened the package and found that it was a fortune cookie!

I found a note “Close your eyes and make a wish!”

The Magical Fortune Cookie

using adjectives

Equipping students with the skills and strategies through targeted instruction 

using prepositional phrase

using figurative language (e.g. simile, metaphor, personification) using relative clauses (who / which / that)

Teachers’ Role

What do the students need to do in order to get there?

Activity 5 (Post-writing)

Improve the following paragraph by applying the strategies above.

1 2 3 4

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Assessment

(3) Providing effective feedback to guide students to make improvement to their writing drafts

using adjectives

Equipping students with the skills and strategies through targeted instruction 

using prepositional phrase

using figurative language (e.g. simile, metaphor, personification) using relative clauses (who / which / that)

What do the students need to do in order to get there?

Activity 5 (Post-writing)

Improve the following paragraph by applying the strategies above.

It was a usual school day. I paid good attention in the lessons as I always did. At recess time, I went to the tuck shop and bought myself some snacks as usual. However, something unusual happened. My classmate, Jacky, who is a shy cunning fox, whispered in my ears, “You don’t have to buy snacks today, you can have this!” I opened the package and found that it was a fortune cookie! I found note inside the cookie, “Close your eyes and make a wish!”

The Magical Fortune Cookie Teachers’ Role

55

1 2 3 4

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66

The LPF for English Language (Speaking)

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Progression of the Learning Outcomes

Content, Organisation and Communication Strategies

ATM 2

ATM 4

ATM 7

Providing and exchanging some simple information, ideas and personal experiences on familiar topics quite clearly, relying at times on non-verbal expressions

some simple information, ideas and personal experiences on familiar topics quite clearly, relying at times on non-verbal

expressions

Organising, presenting and

exchanging information, ideas, personal

experiences and opinions on familiar topics and less familiar topics with some

elaboration clearly, and using a range of

communication strategies

Organising, presenting and exchanging

simple information, ideas, personal experiences and opinionson familiar topics quite clearly, and using formulaic

expressions to facilitate communication

Text complexity

Depth of processing Familiarity with 

topics

Range & application  of speaking 

strategies

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The LPF for English Language (Speaking)

68

(69)

Progression of the Learning Outcomes

Language

ATM 2

ATM 4

ATM 7

Using some simple language forms and functions

quite appropriately

Using simple

language forms and functions

quite appropriately and accurately

Using a range of language forms and functions

generally appropriately and accurately

Use of language 

forms and functions Appropriateness 

and accuracy

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70

The LPF for English Language (Speaking)

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Progression of the Learning Outcomes

Pronunciation, Stress, Rhythm and Intonation

ATM 2

ATM 4

ATM 7

Pronouncing most simple words and imitating

Speaking simple English quite accurately, and

Speaking English

accurately and fluently, and

Pronunciation Stress, rhythm  and intonation

appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation quite accurately

showing an

awareness of stress, rhythm and intonation

with generally appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation

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72

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

(1) Identifying students’ 

strengths & areas for  improvement & setting 

speaking objectives

(3) Providing effective  feedback on students’ 

performance to guide  students to make 

improvement

Promoting Assessment for Learning

(2) Setting task‐specific  assessment criteria and  designing speaking activities to 

help students achieve the 

assessment criteria

(73)

Promoting Assessment for / as Learning

• Equipping students with the skills and 

strategies through targeted instruction and  guidance

• Providing quality feedback that helps  students progress further

• Engaging students in self‐reflection & letting  them keep track of their own learning

Where are the students going?

• Identifying learning goals and assessment criteria

• Using examples & models of strong & weak work

Where are the students now?

Goal What do the students need to do in order to get there?

• Understanding students’ learning performance through a variety of assessment activities, e.g. self-, peer-, teacher assessment

Adapted from: Chappius, J. (2009). Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning. Canada: Pearson Education.

73

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

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74

Understanding students’

speaking performance through a variety of assessment activities (e.g. self-, peer-,

teacher assessment)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

Identifying learning objectives / goals and assessment criteria with

reference to the LPF

(1) Setting learning objectives to help students improve further

Where are the students now?

Designing learning activities and Task-specific

Assessment Forms with reference to the LPF

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Authentic learning materials

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

Sample work of students

Where are the students going?

(2) Setting task‐specific assessment criteria and designing activities to help students meet the assessment criteria

• Using examples and models of strong and weak work

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With reference to the LPF for Speaking, discuss with your group members the challenges that your students are facing. How would you help your students to deal with these challenges?

Activity 6a

67

Pronunciation, stress, rhythm and intonation Language

Content, organisation and communication strategies

Learning and Teaching

(77)

Suggest speaking activities to help students deal with these challenges.

Activity 6b

Pronunciation, stress, rhythm and intonation Language

Content, organisation and communication strategies

Learning and Teaching

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Watch a video clip about a student’s performance in presenting her views about banning smoking in the public. Focus on the communication strategies demonstrated by the student. Identify areas for improvement for the student to work on and suggest learning activities/tips to help the student make improvement.

Activity 7

69

Areas for Improvement

Learning and Teaching

• Eye contact

• Gestures / body language

• Posture

Where are the students now?

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Speaking – ATM 6 Speaking – ATM 7 Speaking – ATM 8

Underlying Principles

The development of some basic communication strategies does not readily lend itself to descriptions of the learning outcomes in terms of eight attainment milestones, for example,

showing interest to communicate,

facing the listener,

maintaining eye contact,

speaking at a volume appropriate to the situation,

enhancing own spoken texts with appropriate gestures and facial expressions,

responding readily to others’ questions, opinions or comments, and

turn-taking in conversations and discussions.

Teachers are expected to help learners develop these basic communication strategies according to learners’

individual affective development.

An example

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

79

Communication Strategies

Speaking Objective

(1) Identifying students’ strengths and areas for improvement

 

、 Maintaining eye contact

Where are the students going?

(80)

71

Learning and Teaching

(2) Setting task‐specific assessment criteria and designing activities to help students meet the assessment criteria

Time management Note-taking

Posture

What do the students need to do in order to get there?

(81)

Learning and Teaching

(2) Setting task‐specific assessment criteria and designing activities to help students meet the assessment criteria

Note-taking Skills

vs

What do the students need to do in order to get there?

Sample A

Sample B

Comment on the two note‐

sheets prepared by two different students.

Activity 7b

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Learning and Teaching

(2) Setting task‐specific assessment criteria and designing activities to help students meet the assessment criteria

Note-taking Skills What do the students need to do in order to get there?

Sample A

The overreliance on notecards remains a problem. It is recommended that candidates take notes (i.e. short phrases and key words) as a reminder of things they would like to bring up in the discussion, and speak as if these were ideas they had been thinking about, rather than writing out ideas in complete sentences.

2018 HKDSE Examination (English Language: Paper 4): Comments by examiners

73

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Learning and Teaching

(2) Setting task‐specific assessment criteria and designing activities to help students meet the assessment criteria

Note-taking Skills

What do the students need to do in order to get there?

• Use of symbols

• Use of graphic organisers

• Highlighting key points

• Numbering

• Use of

abbreviated forms

Sample B

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75

Learning and Teaching

(2) Setting task‐specific assessment criteria and designing activities to help students meet the assessment criteria

Effective Use of Preparation Time

Reading the

topic/instruction Note-taking Practising the speech

What do the students need to do in order to get there?

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Student A: I think Lantau Island is a good place for the drone  lovers because there are fewer high rise buildings  there.

Student B: I totally agree with you. Cheung Sha is a great spot  for flying drones!

Student C: I agree with you. I think Stanley is better as the  scenery is fantastic. 

Student D: I take your point. And I believe drone lovers would  also like to fly their drones in Sai Kung as there are  many country parks suitable for flying drones…

Learning, Teaching and Assessment

Activity 8a

Study an excerpt from a group discussion about flying drones in Hong Kong. Suggest areas for improvement for the students to focus on.

Where are the students now?

Areas for Improvement

Figure

Updating...

References

Related subjects :