Health Management and Social Care

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Health Management and Social Care

Field Learning Resources Series

Agency Handbook

Education Bureau

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1

Contents

Introduction 2

1. Field learning – A Practice of Experiential Learning 3-5

2. Field learning in HMSC curriculum 6-10

3. Roles of Agencies in Field Learning 11-14 3.1

Providing field learning activities 11-12

3.2

Roles of agencies 13-16

Figure Figure 3.1

Experiential Learning Cycle 5 Figure 3.2

Senior Secondary Curriculum 6

Figure 3.3

Curriculum Framework 6

Figure 3.4

An Example of Curriculum Organisation 8 Appendix Appendix(1) – Information of Agency 17

Appendix (2) – Examples of Field Learning Activities 18-31

Appendix(3) – Arrangement of Field learning Activity 32-34

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Field Learning Resources Series (3)

Agency Handbook Introduction

This series aims to provide practical information to agencies/ service units on

“HMSC field learning” which is focused on introducing field learning to

agencies/ service units and will briefly describe the roles of agencies/ service units

in field learning so as to facilitate the collaboration between schools and

agencies/ service units in providing appropriate and meaningful learning

activities to students.

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3

1. Field learning – A Practice of Experiential Learning

As the postmodern world changes rapidly, the association between education

and society has undergone radical variation which necessitates the integration of

teaching and learning procedures that interact with the world in which learners

live.1 A paradigm shift is taking hold in education where a range of teaching and

learning pedagogy has been proposed to replace the traditional

instruction-based one 2

One pedagogical innovation that has grown in popularity is experiential

learning which emphasizes the positive role that reflection over experience might

play in teaching and learning. Some scholars3 have suggested that teaching and

learning can only be accomplished by reflective practice—i.e. critically analysing

experience and acting on the basis of that analysis. This pedagogy can best be

presented by one speech—“An ounce of experience is better than a ton of theory

simply because it is only in experience that any theory has a vital and verifiable

1Cummings, J. (2000). Academic language learning, transformative pedagogy, and information technology:

Towards a critical balance. TESOL Quarterly, 34(3), 537-548..

2Barr, R. B., & Tagg, J. (1995). From teaching to learning—A new paradigm for undergraduate education. Change:

The magazine of higher learning, 27(6), 12-26.

3Dunn, L. (2002). Theories of learning. Learning and Teaching Briefing Papers Series, Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development OCSLD, Oxford Brookes University. ; Freire, P. (1972). Pedagogy of the Oppressed.

Harmondsworth: Penguin.; Knowles, M. S. (1990). The Adult Learner: A Neglected Species (4th ed.). Houston:

Gulf Publishing. ; Knowles, M. S., Holton III, E. F., & Swanson, R. A. (2012). The adult learner. Routledge. ; Schön, D. A. (1983). The reflective practitioner: How professionals think in action. New York: Basic books. ; Sigmon, R.

(1979). Service-learning: Three principles. Synergist, 8(1), 9-11. ; Sigmon, R. L. & Pelletier, S. G. (1996). Journey to Service-Learning: Experiences from Independent Liberal Arts Colleges and Universities. (Eds). Washington, DC:

Council of Independent Colleges.

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significance”4

A common approach to comprehending experiential learning is linked to a

learning cycle5 of concrete experience, observation and reflection, abstract

conceptualization, and testing of concepts in new situations (Figure 3.1).

According to this learning model, the concrete experience is the basis for

observations and reflections, which allow the development of concepts (i.e.

knowledge). Concepts6 are then tested in new situations to lead to more concrete

experience. The process is continuous and can begin at any of the stages. In order

to ensure the learning be effective, all five of these stages must be incorporated.

4 Dewey, J. (1985). Democracy and education, 1916. in J. A. Boydston, & P. Baysinger (Eds.). John Dewey: The middle works, 1899-1924. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press. , p. 109

5Furco, A. (1996). Service-learning: A balanced approach to experiential education. Expanding boundaries:Serving and learning, 1, 1-6. ; Rogers, A., & Horrocks, N. (2010). Teaching adults. McGraw-Hill International.

6 Kolb, D.A. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood

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Figure 3.1 Experiential Learning Cycle

Simply put, experiential learning advocates the idea of which learners are

given concrete opportunities to observe and reflect from actual practices (i.e.

experience), to apply knowledge and skills, to test and criticize assumptions, to

juxtapose ideas and beliefs, to develop and enhance certain skills (mostly

reflective, critical and problem-solving skills), and to construct knowledge about

the world and its relations.7

7 Dovros, N., & Makrakis, V. (2012). Transforming the Classroom into a Reflective Community: A Blended Learning Instructional Approach. Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability, 14(2), 73-88.

This learning cycle will loop from Secondary 4 to 6, in which students undergo continuous construction and consolidation of their knowledge through

experiences and reflection.

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2. Field Learning in HMSC Curriculum

HMSC is one of the elective subjects in secondary school (Secondary 4 to 6)

Figure 3.2

The topics of HMSC curriculum are as follows:

Figure 3.3

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In the learning process, students have the opportunity to develop a holistic

view of health and social care through personal empowerment, involvement in

groups, community learning and action, and the application of strategies of social

advocacy. In this way, students should be able to acquire the foundation

knowledge stipulated in the compulsory part before attempting the elective part.

Field learning provides learners with authentic settings to facilitate integration

and coordination between theoretical (compulsory part) and applied (elective

part) knowledge. It is an integral component of the HMSC curriculum and

actualized through a collaborative and reciprocal relationship between the school

(and teachers), community organizations and institutions and students. Figure 3.4

shows an example of field learning arranged for the subject.8

8 Curriculum Development Council & Hong Kong Examination and Assessment Authority (2007). Technology Education Key Learning Area: Health Management and Social Care Curriculum and Assessment Guide (Secondary 4-6) (p.44). Hong Kong: Education and Manpower Bureau.

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Figure 3.4

9

Teachers will decide the sequences that fit the needs of schools, students,

social organizations or other relevant parties. The core principle is that

9 Jointly prepared by the Curriculum Development Council and the Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment Authority, 2007. “Health Management and Social Care- Curriculum and Assessment Guide (Secondary 4 to 6)”.

Secondary 4 Secondary 5 Secondary 6

Field learning

Module 1:

Extended Study on Health Promotion and Health Maintenance Services

Module 2 :

Extended Study on Community and Social Care Services

Module 3:

Current Issues of Health and Social Care

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students are able to extend their knowledge acquired in the compulsory part

through engaging in practical learning experiences where knowledge can be

applied in actual practices. This means teachers can arrange and help

students to engage in their field learning any point whenever

appropriate —teachers, for instance, can arrange agency visit for Secondary 4

(S4) students to observe the environment, to meet the service users or

patients or to talk to the staff. This learning experience in S4 equips students

with relevant knowledge and skills for planning the field learning, carrying

out their plans and achieving the learning targets in Secondary 5 (S5), which

provides them with authentic contexts to apply and consolidate the essential

value, knowledge and skills, such as communication and interpersonal skills,

professional ethics and values, healthy practices for personal and social

well-beings, relevant to the extended study.

The aims and learning targets of field learning are as follows:

Curriculum Aims

 Develop an understanding of the various approaches to creating and maintaining a healthy community and appreciate the value of sustaining its development;

 Develop the basic competencies necessary to research, analyze, evaluate and communicate issues pertaining to health and to social and community care, and participate in related support services provided by institutions and agencies;

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Learning Targets

Knowledge

and

understanding

 Understand the structures, processes, techniques and practices in health and social care groups and agencies, and assess their

effectiveness.

Capability  Plan and implement health promotion and social care activities

in various environments and contexts, and for different groups;

demonstrate the skills needed to interact with people when

providing support to others.

Field Learning can achieve the following learning outcomes:

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3. Roles of Agencies in Field Learning 3.1 Providing field learning activities

The partnership between school and agency is a significant component of the

whole field learning experience. The agencies offer authentic settings for students

to apply the concepts and theories learnt in the HMSC curriculum. It helps

students plan and organise health promotion and social care programs for a

variety of social groups, in which students learn interpersonal skills when helping

others. A good field learning experience may inspire or motivate students to

pursue further study in related fields.

Field learning builds on a good cooperation between schools and organisations

(agencies). Continuous communication is needed in the design, implementation,

supervision and evaluation of the field learning tasks in order to ensure the How can field learning help service units directly?

Wisdom of Teachers

※ Students provide different types of activities for service units and help them to promote services through field learning.

※ Field learning serves as a channel for service units to promote service in different settings, such as schools.

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visions and learning objectives are shared and understood by both parties.

Some service units may have mistaken field learning as a kind of service

learning, which is an educational activity to all students in general. Teachers may

need to introduce the following outstanding features of field learning to service

units:

 Field learning nurtures the youth to be responsible and caring citizens who wish to be a helping person. It matches the visions of a majority of agencies

and service units.

 Field learning provides volunteers to service units who are inspired to work in the fields of health and social services. It provides manpower to the service

units and supports the service delivery. For example, getting along with the

young people may bring fresh experience to elder clients. The field learning

activities only take place within a short period of time. The service units can

either arrange a few events or one-off event for students to organise or

participate in (such as telling life stories or festival celebrating activities).

 Due to the aging population and the changes in the labour market, there is labour shortage in the fields of social services and residential care. HMSC

field learning allows students to directly reach the service users in real-life

circumstances, inspire their interest in health and social care, and equip them

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with services experiences, fundamental techniques and knowledge, so as to

become enthusiastic and capable workers in the health and social welfare

services from all walks of life. Field learning provides opportunities for

students to gain relevant and practical training when serving the service

units.

3.2 Roles of agencies:

Only limited resources are required for the agencies to support field learning.

Agencies may negotiate with schools and concerned teachers on the degree of

participation regarding their resources or other factors (Appendix 1), and decide the

types of field learning activities that can be offered (Appendix 2).

Example of field learning:

Agencies are encouraged to review if they accept the following commitment

before starting the cooperation with schools and teachers:

 willing to collaborate with schools to plan the field learning activities;

 committed and supportive to the beliefs, mode and objectives of field learning;

or or

Assistance to carry out service

 Students participate in providing services as a volunteer

As service users

 Let students join the talks and trainings

Planning and implementing services

 Students plan and implement services on their own

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 willing to assign relevant person(s) to work with the HMSC teachers;

 willing to involve HMSC students in providing services so they could understand more about the modes of service delivery;

 willing to answer students’ questions regarding the operation and the professional intervention of the service units;

 willing to provide appropriate support to teachers and students in the field learning activities

 willing to provide students with opportunities to have contacts with clients;

and

 willing to give feedback on the field learning activities and performance of students, etc.;

After confirmation on assisting schools and teachers to practice field learning,

agencies and organisations can:

Before activity:

Assign a responsible staff as the contact person between the school and the service unit, looking after the administrative arrangement during the field

learning activities and understanding the design and implementation of field

learning, as well as the assignments to be completed by students.

.

Let schools and teachers understand the specific procedures, particular

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guidelines and instructions (such as infection control measures) of the service

units (such as hospitals, half-way houses, elderly homes, clinics). Confirm if

the students need to attend pre-activity trainings like infection control

training to help them understand and follow the relevant practices (such as

washing hands, wearing gloves, gowns or masks)

 Confirm the details of relevant arrangement with the school and teachers (Appendix 3).

During Activity:

Provide briefing for students to understand more about the aims, mission, structure, roles and tasks, resources and facilities of the service units.

 Closely communicate with the teachers and understand the design of the activities so as to help the students apply theoretical knowledge into field

learning activities

.

If teachers are unable to supervise the activities on the site, ensure that the appointed staff is responsible for the overall arrangement of the activities and

taking care of the students’ safety.

ensure that students will not contact with the clients with potential dangers, such as those with propensity for violence, those who are vulnerable in

contacts with outsiders, as well as the patients of infectious diseases.

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 Whenever necessary, help students to communicate with vulnerable groups (such as patients suffering from serious illness) effectively, e.g. to avoid

inappropriate manner and sensitive issues.

Ensure that students follow the regulations of the agency, accept the instructions, and pay extra attention to protect the safety and confidentiality of the personal

information of service users. No matter the organisation has settled the

complaints or grievances or not, the agency staff should report to teachers about

the conflicts between students and staff/ clients

.

Give feedback to help students build competence for self-assessment

Ensure all students are equally involved in the field learning activities but also protect the interests of service users

If the field learning activities are held outside school, teachers and service units should prepare contingency plan in case of bad weather, and inform students

and their parents of the relevant arrangement

After activity:

Give feedback on students’ learning and the design of the activities.

Evaluate the current arrangement and reach initial agreement for the improvement and collaboration in future

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Health Management and Social Care Updated Information of Field Learning

Information of Agency

Name of Agency:

Brief Introduction of

Services:

(Not more than 100 words)

Types of Activity that Can be Provided for Field

Learning:

Service Area(s) / District(s):

Client (s):

No. of students per

Activity:

Person(s)

Training provided:

 Yes

 No

Training Fee:

 Charges

 Free of Charge Contact

Person: Tel.

No.:

Website: Fax:

Email Address:

APPENDIX 1

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Examples of Field Learning Activities Setting: Social Service Units

Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Children and Youth Centre

Topics: Healthy social well-being/ Personal growth and development (childhood and adolescence)

 Examples of relevant concepts : communication skills, peer relationship, self-concept, parenting skills, interpersonal relationship, conflict management

 Environment: safety measures

 Characteristics of client groups

 Learning

atmosphe

re

 Services provided

 Job duties of various workers in the unit

※Clients

 Needs

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※Professionals

 Working condition

 Duties

 Intervention objectives, approaches and skills

 Work related training

programmes / pathways

 Difficulties related to the jobs

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 After-school care programmes

 Play Group

 After school tutorial programmes

Sit in / Be an observer in:

 Workshop on parenting skills

 Children Group

 Youth group

 Parents group APPENDIX 2

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Anti-drug Abuse Centre

Topic : Addiction

 Examples of relevant concepts : reasons for addiction, treatment,

“relapse prevention”

 Environment of the centre

 Services provided

 Staff relationship

 Job duties of various workers in the unit

※Clients

 Needs

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Family relationship

 Peer relationship

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※Professional

 Working condition

 Duties

 Intervention objectives, approaches and skills

 Work related training

programmes / pathways

 Difficulties related to the jobs

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 Anti-drug ambassador

 School promotion activities

 Writing stories of ex-drug addicts

 Anti-drug carnival

Sit in / Be an observer in:

 Sharing of

ex-drug addicts

 Talks on drugs

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Special Education Centre for Children

Topics : Personal growth and development (childhood stage) /vulnerable groups

 Examples of relevant concepts: justice, discrimination, community resources, characteristics of students in childhood, peer relationship, self-concept, parenting skills, pressure on caretakers.

 Environment: safety measures

 Characteristics of client groups

 Learning atmosphere

 Services provided

 Job duties of various workers in the unit

※Clients : Parents

 Needs

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Family relationship

 Stressors

 Stress management

 Peer relationship

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※Professional

 Duties / division of work

 Intervention objectives, approaches and skills

 Work related training

programmes / pathways

 Difficulties related to the jobs

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 Communication games

 Exercises

 Neighbourhood scheme

Sit in / Be an observer in:

 Workshop on parenting skills

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Elderly Centre

Topics : Personal growth and development (elderly) , aging problem, social welfare system, healthcare system

 Examples of relevant concepts: elderly eating habits, health literacy , disease prevention, interpersonal relationship, communication skills.

 Environment: safety measures

 Characteristics of client groups

 Atmosphere of the centre

 Services provided

 Job duties of various workers in the unit

※Clients

 Needs

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Health literacy

 Healthy lifestyles

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※Professional

 Duties / division of work

 Intervention objectives, approaches and skills

 Work related training

programmes / pathways

 Difficulties related to the jobs

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 Health promotion activities

 Visits

 Writing life stories

 Intergenerational learning

program – teaching computer knowledge / exercises to elderly

 Chinese medicine promotion

Carnival

 Neighbourhood scheme

 Health checks for single elderly

 Prevention of fall

 Intergenerational Sports Day

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Integrated Family Service Centre

Topics : Personal growth (family roles) , family relationship, family problems, social welfare system

 Examples of relevant concepts : interpersonal relationship, family relationship, communication among family members, holistic health

 Atmosphere of the centre

 Services provided

 Job duties of various workers in the unit

※ Client

 Needs

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Physical, intellectual, emotional and social aspects of health (PIES)

 Family relationship

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※ Professionals

 Duties / division of work

 Intervention objectives, approaches and skills

 Work related training

programmes / pathways

 Difficulties related to the jobs

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 Assist in

organising family activities, for example: family picnic

 Community survey

 Neighbourhood scheme

Sit in / Be an observer in:

 Workshop on parenting skills

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

New

Immigrant Service Centre

Topics : Vulnerable groups, Caring community

 Examples of relevant concepts: equality, discrimination, cultural differences, community resources, self-concept, vulnerable groups, community work, community support network, different forms of care, empowerment, holistic health, social welfare system.

 Environment: safety measures

 Characteristics of client groups

 Atmosphere of the centre

 Services provided

 Job duties of various workers in the unit

※ Clients

 Problems

 Needs

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Physical, intellectual, emotional and social aspects of health (PIES)

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※Professionals

 Duties / division of work

 Intervention objectives, approaches and skills

 Work related training

programmes / pathways

 Difficulties related to the jobs

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 After-school care programmes

 Neighbourhood scheme

Sit in / Be an observer in:

 Workshop on parenting skills

 Home safety measures

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Organisaions / services for poverty alleviation

Topics : Building a healthy city, poverty

 Examples of relevant concepts : poverty, need-based approach, assets -based approach, equality, discrimination, cultural difference, community resources , self-concept, vulnerable groups, community work, community support network, different forms of care,

empowerment, holistic health, social welfare system.

 Environment and facilities of the centre

 Characteristics of client groups

 Atmosphere of the centre

 Services provided - need-based

approach, assets -based approach

 Job duties of various workers in the

centre

※ Clients

 Problems

 Needs

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Neighbourhood relationship

Physical, intellectual, emotional and social aspects of health (PIES)

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※Professionals

 Duties / division of work

 Intervention objectives, approaches and skills

 Work related training

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 Hunger Banquet

 Cyber School

 Volunteer service

 School Donations

Possible learning activities:

 Observing

squatter occupant living condition

 Visiting people in bed space and cubicle

apartments

 Community tours

Sit in / Be an observer in:

 Food Bank

 District partnership programmes

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity pathways

 Difficulties related to the jobs

 Approach on

alleviating poverty

※Other students, school staff

 Views on poverty

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Setting: Health / Medical Service Units

Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Health Centre / Community Health Promotion

(e.g. Health InfoWorld of Hospital Authority)

Topics : Health promotion, disease prevention

 Examples of relevant concepts : holistic health, health education, models of health promotion, personal health practices and public health, healthy practices, different stages of illness prevention, healthy lifestyle

 Environment: safety measures

 Characteristics of client groups

 Atmosphere of the centre

 Services provided - for example:

 Vaccination

 Outreaching service

 Community service

 Job duties of various workers in the centre

※Clients

 Need

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Risk assessment

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※Professionals

 Duties / division of work

 Promotion and intervention methods

 Work related training

programmes / pathways

 Difficulties related to the jobs

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 Health promotion activity – health education exhibition

 Quiz on

communicable diseases

Sit in / Be an observer in:

 Physical check-ups

 Health talks

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Hospitals / care-and–

attention homes / day hospitals

Topic : Health care system

 Examples of relevant concepts : three levels of medical care, first aid skills, disease prevention and infection control, hospital three-tier alert mechanism, residential care, community care, medical care

 Environment of the institution

 Atmosphere of the institution

 Services provided, for example:

 Polyclinic

 Outpatient clinic

 Pharmacy

 Three-tier medical care

 Characteristics of client groups

 Job duties of various workers in the centre

 Atmosphere of the team work

 Risk assessment

※Patient and care givers

 Need

 Difficulties: e.g.

reactions after medication

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※Professionals

 Duties / division of work

 Work related training

programmes / pathways

Difficulties related to the jobs

 Roles and skills of management

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 Health promotion activities

 Visits

Sit in / Be an observer in:

 Seminars on infection control

 Talks on the needs of patients

 Seminars on communication skills with

patients

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Rehabilitation Service

e.g.: Half-way Home

(Psychiatric)

Topics : Health care system, mental health, rehabilitation services

 Examples of relevant concepts : residential care, community care, rehabilitation services, classification of mental illness, needs of patients with mental illness, isolation, discrimination, institutionalization

 Environment of the institution

 Atmosphere of the institution

 Services provided

 Characteristics of client groups

 Job duties of various workers in the centre

 Atmosphere of the team work

 Risk assessment

※Clients

 Needs

 Difficulties: e.g community

integration, living in the community

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※ Family members of patients

 Informal care

 Feelings

 Support network

※Professionals

 Work condition

 Intervention approach and skills

 Training

 System of the

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 Health promotion activities

 Visits

 Health information Exhibition

Possible learning activities:

 Sharing of Rehabilitees

 Stress

management workshop

 Workshops on health care practice

 Seminars on positive psychology

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Service Unit Observation Interview Service / Activity

Patient self-help groups (e.g. physical disabled,

vision-impaired, hearing-impaired

&

speech-impaired)

Topic : Caring Community

 Examples of relevant concepts: vulnerable groups,

communication skills, community work, community support network, different forms of care, models of health promotion, empowerment, needs of caregiver, holistic health, health care and social welfare systems

 Environment and facilities of the centre

 Characteristics of client groups

 Relationship among patients

 Atmosphere of the centre

 Services provided

 Job duties of various workers in the centre

※Patient

 Needs

 Difficulties: e.g.

reactions after medication, medical expenses

 Views on services

 Experience of using the services

 Relevant questions to explore other concepts

※Family members of the patients

 Informal support/

Support network

 Feelings

※Professional

 Work condition

 Intervention

approach and skills

 Training

 Advocacy work

 Organisational skills

Volunteer services can be provided through:

 Health promotion activities

Neighbourhood scheme

Sit in / Be an observer in:

 Home help &

care services

 Training for self-help groups, for example:

workshops on health care practice

Possible learning activities:

 Experiencing the daily lives of the disabled

 Barrier-free city campaign

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Setting: Schools

Target Groups Observation Interview Service / Activity

Students and School

Staff

Topic : Healthy School

 Examples of relevant concepts: health advocacy, safety settings, holistic health, risk, risk assessment, risk management, healthy lifestyles, interpersonal relationship, peers, disease prevention.

Risk assessment:

 School environment:

lighting、safety measures etc.

 Work condition of school staff

Holistic health:

 Supply of snacks at tuck shops

 Exercises / PE lessons

 School breakfast and lunch

※Students and school Staff

 Eating habit

 Health knowledge – drug addiction

 Physical, intellectual, emotional and social aspects of health (PIES)

 Attitude towards disease prevention / healthy lifestyles

 Peer relationship

※Parent

 Parenting skills / counseling skills

 Communication skills

 School tour- Assessing the safety and risks of facilities Inside and outside school

 Health promotion activities

 Food label design competition

 Healthy diet carnival

 Peer

counseling schemes

 Questionnaires survey :

different people with different perspectives on health

 Sharing of

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ambassadors

 Stress

management, such as ‘Mind Oasis’ mental health

workshop

 Eat

smart@school campaign

 Collecting and analyzing data related to healthy diets at schools

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Arrangement of field learning activity

Project Content

1. Agency name:

2. Agency address:

3. Agency contact number:

4. Period of time:

From (date) in 20_____ to (date) in 20____

5. Number of students:

No. of Person in total: ( Male Female)

Level: Secondary

6. Learning activity in the agency:

Forms No. of persons Date No. of hours

7. Financial expenses:

 Paid by agency

 Paid by school

 Paid by both agency and school

 Others:

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8. Responsible staff of agency

Name:

Position:

Contact number:

Email:

9. Responsible teacher of school

Name:

Position:

Contact number:

Email

10. Other remarks:

i) During the period, the agency should

designate a staff as the agent to help

arrange for the field learning activities.

ii) During the period, if school teachers are

unable to participate, the designated staff of

the agency should be responsible for the

overall arrangement of the activity, as well

as the safety of students.

iii) When students use the venues provided by

the agency for field learning, they must

follow the regulations set by the agency,

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accept staff’s instructions, and pay

attention to the safety issues and keep the

users’ personal information confidential.

iv) Everything in field learning is jointly set by

the school and the agency and should be

implemented according to the agreed plan.

v) If the performance of students is

unsatisfactory, or students are unable to

fulfil the work assigned by the teacher(s)

and agency, the agency should inform and

discuss with the responsible school

teacher(s).

vi) Field learning activities should be relevant

to the knowledge of the curriculum.

vii) The agency must not allow students to

undergo dangerous and illegal activities, or

assign work that is unrelated to the aims of

field learning.

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