Fostering an “Entrepreneurial Spirit”

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Collaborative Research and Development (“Seed”) Projects

for the 2021/22 School Year

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Council & Secondary Section Curriculum Development Institute

February 2021

Fostering an “Entrepreneurial Spirit”

through Whole-school Curriculum Planning

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Fostering an “Entrepreneurial Spirit”

through Whole-school Curriculum Planning Fostering an “Entrepreneurial Spirit”

through Whole-school Curriculum Planning

Adopting appropriate and effective strategies to evaluate/provide feedback on students’ entrepreneurial competencies

Encouraging creativity and iterative experimentation in the problem solving process to allow students to take ownership of their learning Promoting cross-curricular collaboration on conducting various learning activities to encourage students to make endeavours, take on challenges and innovate

Enhancing teachers’ professional competence in promoting school- based curriculum development with a view to fostering an

“entrepreneurial spirit” in students

Enabling students to define a problem and formulate plans for approaching it in a life-wide learning context

Objectives

Promoting whole-school curriculum planning through sharing visions, reaching consensus, creating space and formulating actionable plans

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This revolution is already in homes across the developed world and increasingly in the

developing world too. … But, so far, this

revolution has not transformed most schools or most teaching and learning in classrooms.

(Sir Michael Barber, 2014)

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… education systems … rely heavily on passive forms of learning focused on direct

instruction and memorisation, rather than interactive methods that promote the critical and individual thinking needed in

today’s innovation-driven economy.

(World Economic Forum, 2020)

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If all we do is teach our children what we know, they might remember enough to follow our footsteps; but if they learn how

to learn, are able to think for themselves and work with others, they can go

anywhere they want.

(Andreas Schleicher, PISA, 2018)

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… high-stakes exams … only measure a far narrower range of traditional

performance ….

… if assessment systems fail to reflect the future skills that employers

demand they will lose credibility naturally.

(Economist Intelligence Unit, 2017)

CREATIVITY

COLLABORATION

ADAPTABILITY

TIME MANAGEMENT

PERSUASION EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

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develop in students the competencies

required for meeting future

challenges?

add variety to students’

learning

experiences and promote learner

autonomy?

monitor and evaluate student

learning in a real-life context?

How can we …

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Develop personal

qualities and attitudes

 Ability and willingness to take the initiative

 Innovation and creativity

 Willingness to take risks

 Self-confidence

 Ability to collaborate and social skills

Learn subjects and basic skills through the use of

entrepreneurial working methods

Learn knowledge and skills

concerning business

development and innovative process

Ministry of Education and Research, Norway, 2010

Entrepreneurship in Education

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Entrepreneurship education is essential for developing the human capital necessary for society of the future. It is not enough to add

entrepreneurship on the perimeter – it needs to be core to the way education operates.

World Economic Forum, 2009

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Values Education (including MCE &

Basic Law education) Chinese History

and Chinese

Culture STEM

Education &

ITE

Entrepreneurial Spirit

Language across the Curriculum

(LaC) Teaching

Chinese as a Second Language Gifted

Education Life-wide

Learning

Major Renewed Emphases

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Development of an entrepreneurial spirit

 is not confined to teaching students to start and run new businesses;

 can focus on developing knowledge, generic skills, positive values and attitudes which will benefit students

 in their personal development

 as future endeavours as business owners, freelancers or innovators

(Secondary Education Curriculum Guide 2017)

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Entrepreneurship in Education

• builds the enterprise competencies and introduces business competencies,

leading to start-up and new business development.

• focuses broadly on the development of

enterprise competencies that are essential in the workplace, and related to personal development, mindset, skills and

abilities

• learners to demonstrate a

‘can-do’ confidence, a creative questioning approach, and the

willingness to take risks in uncertainty and flexible working patterns

• learners to show the attributes of teamwork, initiative, originality and

self-discipline. OECD 2015; The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education UK 2018

The premise of the Seed Project

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Handicraft Making

Students to design and make household objects for the underprivileged

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Prototype

Test •Test your ideas

Define •Develop points of view based on the users’

needs

Empathise •Understand the users

Learning Opportunity: Addressing and Defining Problems through DESIGN THINKING

Ideate •Propose creative solutions

•Create designs underpinned by your

thoughts

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Learning Opportunity:

A CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPROACH

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Students in teams draw knowledge from different disciplines and formulate action plans for design and make

Requisite knowledge, skills & attitudes

Visual Arts - Woodwork /

pottery:

historical and cultural value, techniques - Aesthetic

perception

- Artistic heritage - Appreciation of

Chinese arts

Design &

Technology - Creativity /

Innovativeness - Problem Solving - Self-

determination - Risk-taking

Chinese History - Learning about

Chinese history and culture in the context of traditional

handicrafts and everyday objects

Languages - Active listening

in interview - Drawing

consensus in group planning

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Learning Opportunity: Interaction with the

REAL WORLD

Interpersonal Skills

Interpersonal Skills

Marketing Skills Marketing Skills

Engagement with local craftsmen/practitioners

in the creative industry

• Students learn more about innovative

thinking and translating ideas into practice.

• Students pitch their creative output

(e.g. tea ware) at a real audience as part of assessment.

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Problem-based learning

Planning a research, formulating

hypotheses and predicting

outcomes

Analysing personal roles and

responsibilities in making

contribution to society

Problem-based learning

Planning a research, formulating

hypotheses and predicting

outcomes

Analysing personal roles and

responsibilities in making

contribution to society

Nurturing Entrepreneurial Competencies:

Possible Approaches

Pitching Role-play Conducting a survey/interview

Presenting ideas and viewpoints logically in

different modes Pitching

Role-play Conducting a survey/interview

Presenting ideas and viewpoints logically in

different modes

Design thinking Connecting ideas using mind maps, imagery,

analogies, etc., to create new

possibilities Conducting a scientific investigation

Making a prototype

Design thinking Connecting ideas using mind maps, imagery,

analogies, etc., to create new

possibilities Conducting a scientific investigation

Making a prototype

Sustaining a discussion Co-operative learning

Sustaining a discussion Co-operative learning

Marketing Skills -Dealing

with/persuading stakeholders

-Adapting a message to a target group -Gauging people’s needs

Interpersonal Skills

-Interpreting, synthesising and appreciating various viewpoints

-Resolving conflicts Innovativeness

-Initiating new thoughts for action -Expanding and refining ideas

-Discerning novelty from observation Opportunity Skills -Recognising/acting on opportunities -Asking questions about what is missing/what could be better -Developing a vision

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Pedagogical considerations

Subjects involved

Real-life problems connected with subject curricula

Knowledge, skills &

attitudes necessary for students to

innovate

Integrating design thinking

into the learning process Range of

possible student output A meaningful

platform for students to present their

output

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Commitment

• The seconded teacher to:

 plan and implement curriculum initiatives through a whole-school approach and in alignment with the school context

 direct and support cross-curricular collaboration

• Space/flexibility in curriculum planning and implementation

• Learning activities within and beyond timetabled periods

• Collection of evidence (e.g. classroom observations, interviews) on the process of change and impact of student learning

• Engagement with outside organisations

• Dissemination of good practices to other schools after

the tryout

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A joint venture between the School and the EDB

Building on the strengths of the School

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Application

• EDBCM No.4/2021 (Appendix B with Annexes 2 and 3;

Appendix C)

• Deadline: 10 March 2021 (Wednesday)

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Project Proposal (Appendix C)

• Needs of school/students

• Schools’ commitment to the project (e.g. timetabling,

staff involvement,

curriculum adaptation)

• Previous experience in implementing project learning/cross-curricular learning

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Project Co-ordinators

 Mr HO Chi-nap

Council & Secondary Section, Curriculum Development Institute

Email: cpmspsi1@edb.gov.hk / Tel: 2892 6681

 Mr Jimmy LEUNG

Council & Secondary Section, Curriculum Development Institute

Email: cdocs41@edb.gov.hk / Tel: 2892 6448

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References (1)

Barber M., 2014, Foreword for “A Rich Seam – How New

Pedagogies Find Deep Learning”, by M Fullan & M Langworthy EDB HKSAR 2017, Secondary Education Curriculum Guide

EIU, 2017, Worldwide Educating for the Future Index – A benchmark for the skills of tomorrow

Lackeus M., 2015, Entrepreneurship in Education – What, Why, When, How. OECD.

LinkedIn, 2019 & 2020, The skills that employers most looking for Ministry of Education and Research, Norway 2010, Action Plan – Entrepreneurship in Education and Training – from Compulsory School to Higher Education 2009-2014

OECD, 2019, Future of Education and Skills 2030 – Learning Compass 2030, A Series of Concept Notes

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References (2)

Penaluna A. & Penaluna K., 2015, Entrepreneurial Education in Practice – Building Motivations and Competencies. OECD.

Schleicher A., PISA, 2018, Insights and Interpretations

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education UK, 2018, Enterprise & Entrepreneurship Education – Guidance for UK Higher Education Providers

World Economic Forum, 2016, The Future of Jobs –

Employment, skills and workforce strategy for the fourth industrial revolution

World Economic Forum, 2019, Educating the Next Wave of Entrepreneurs – Unlocking Entrepreneurial Capabilities to meet the Global Challenges of the 21st Century

World Economic Forum, 2020, Schools of the Future – Defining New Models of Education for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

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